WEFOUNDAnne Boleyn: In Her Own Words


On September 1st 1532 Henry VIII created Anne Boleyn Marquis of Pembroke to give her social standing among the other noble and royal houses in Europe and so she would be fit to marry him. Pembroke had once belonged to his grand-uncle, Jasper Tudor, albeit he was created an earl by his half brother Henry VI shortly before the start of the wars of the roses along with his brother Edmund Tudor who was created Earl of Richmond (Edmund, was Henry VIII’s grandfather).

We can only speculate, but it is safe to assume that during the months leading to her coronation and September, Anne felt joyful, perhaps even hopeful that things would come out alright.

After the Mass, Anne made a small offering to the shrine of St. Edward then was escorted by her father to the great banquet that awaited her in Whitehall (which was reputedly Anne’s favorite residence). Upon her arrival, the heralds cried:

Anne Boleyn (c.1501/1507 - 1536), the second wife of British King Henry VIII, was the first of his wives to be executed. She had been charged with treason, adultery and incest. She was originally ordered to be burned at the stake (the sentence for adultery), but Henry commuted her sentence to beheading.

Anne's primary crime was that of adultery (considered a form of treason), which she denied throughout her short imprisonment. At least four other...

Anne Boleyn (c.1501/1507 - 1536), the second wife of British King Henry VIII, was the first of his wives to be executed. She had been charged with treason, adultery and incest. She was originally ordered to be burned at the stake (the sentence for adultery), but Henry commuted her sentence to beheading.

On September 1st 1532 Henry VIII created Anne Boleyn Marquis of Pembroke to give her social standing among the other noble and royal houses in Europe and so she would be fit to marry him. Pembroke had once belonged to his grand-uncle, Jasper Tudor, albeit he was created an earl by his half brother Henry VI shortly before the start of the wars of the roses along with his brother Edmund Tudor who was created Earl of Richmond (Edmund, was Henry VIII’s grandfather).

We can only speculate, but it is safe to assume that during the months leading to her coronation and September, Anne felt joyful, perhaps even hopeful that things would come out alright.

After the Mass, Anne made a small offering to the shrine of St. Edward then was escorted by her father to the great banquet that awaited her in Whitehall (which was reputedly Anne’s favorite residence). Upon her arrival, the heralds cried:

On September 1st 1532 Henry VIII created Anne Boleyn Marquis of Pembroke to give her social standing among the other noble and royal houses in Europe and so she would be fit to marry him. Pembroke had once belonged to his grand-uncle, Jasper Tudor, albeit he was created an earl by his half brother Henry VI shortly before the start of the wars of the roses along with his brother Edmund Tudor who was created Earl of Richmond (Edmund, was Henry VIII’s grandfather).

We can only speculate, but it is safe to assume that during the months leading to her coronation and September, Anne felt joyful, perhaps even hopeful that things would come out alright.

After the Mass, Anne made a small offering to the shrine of St. Edward then was escorted by her father to the great banquet that awaited her in Whitehall (which was reputedly Anne’s favorite residence). Upon her arrival, the heralds cried:

Anne Boleyn (c.1501/1507 - 1536), the second wife of British King Henry VIII, was the first of his wives to be executed. She had been charged with treason, adultery and incest. She was originally ordered to be burned at the stake (the sentence for adultery), but Henry commuted her sentence to beheading.

Anne's primary crime was that of adultery (considered a form of treason), which she denied throughout her short imprisonment. At least four other...

Anne Boleyn (c.1501/1507 - 1536), the second wife of British King Henry VIII, was the first of his wives to be executed. She had been charged with treason, adultery and incest. She was originally ordered to be burned at the stake (the sentence for adultery), but Henry commuted her sentence to beheading.

Anne was not short of enemies at court.  She had a close ring of male supporters, that included her beloved brother George, but otherwise she was disliked for her ousting of Henry’s first wife, Catherine of Aragon, her religious beliefs and her sharp tongue.  Thomas Cromwell, Henry’s chief minister, who had since replaced Cardinal Wolsey in the King’s favour, also wanted the fiery Queen discredited.  He saw the King’s waning desire and engineered a cruel plot.

Cromwell began to gather evidence to prove that Anne had committed adultery with several men, one of whom was her own brother George Boleyn.  This was High Treason, punishable by death.  On April 30, 1536 the Queen’s musician and friend Mark Seaton was arrested along with George and other male courtiers loyal to Anne.  On May 2, Anne herself was arrested and charged not only with adultery and incest but also for plotting to murder Henry.  Smeaton, under torture, confessed.

On May 12, all the men, with the exception of George, were put on trial; they were not allowed to defend themselves as was customary in cases of treason.  With the exception of Smeaton all pleaded their innocence but were found guilty and sentenced to be hung, drawn and quartered.


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