WEFOUNDChristmas Carol and Other Christmas Classics (Fall River Classics)


Hold your "bah, humbug." Kristina Semenova, the woman doing the "translating," is turning books like "A Christmas Carol" into puzzles for kids to solve and enjoy through her company, Vaikon.

The books are rebuses: They combine normally written words with emojis that substitute for words or parts of words. So the classic opening paragraph that opens with, "Marley was dead: to begin with" becomes this:

One emoji can serve many purposes: The same symbol could indicate different nouns, verbs or adjectives, depending on the context. For instance, the trophy emoji () could stand in for the words "win," "prize," "success," "glory," or "trophy."

Hold your "bah, humbug." Kristina Semenova, the woman doing the "translating," is turning books like "A Christmas Carol" into puzzles for kids to solve and enjoy through her company, Vaikon.

The books are rebuses: They combine normally written words with emojis that substitute for words or parts of words. So the classic opening paragraph that opens with, "Marley was dead: to begin with" becomes this:

One emoji can serve many purposes: The same symbol could indicate different nouns, verbs or adjectives, depending on the context. For instance, the trophy emoji () could stand in for the words "win," "prize," "success," "glory," or "trophy."

This blog post marks day 15 of the amazing F# Advent Calendar . Christmas is getting closer - soon we will have time to relax and perhaps read a nice book. Do you know who wrote the classic Christmas story, 'A Christmas Carol' ? All sources claim it was Charles Dickens, but how can we be sure? I'll look at how this book compares to other books he wrote in terms of the language used in the books. I'll also analyse other classic works of literature from the Victorian and Edwardian era and look at similarity of their language. In the end, I'll try to find out if it really was Charles Dickens who wrote 'A Christmas Carol'.

This is a simple data analysis project which compares and visualises some publicly available classic English books. General approach to analysis of complex data that are hard to compare directly is to describe the data using a set of characteristic features. For my literature analysis, I'll be using frequencies of pairs of letters, called bigrams. These simple features capture some characteristics of the language that different authors use.

I compute such features for a set of classic books in English. Then I use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to find how different is the language of different authors. I also use the PCA projection to visualise the data and visually explore their similarity.

Uploaded by JesseBell on September 30, 2009

Hold your "bah, humbug." Kristina Semenova, the woman doing the "translating," is turning books like "A Christmas Carol" into puzzles for kids to solve and enjoy through her company, Vaikon.

The books are rebuses: They combine normally written words with emojis that substitute for words or parts of words. So the classic opening paragraph that opens with, "Marley was dead: to begin with" becomes this:

One emoji can serve many purposes: The same symbol could indicate different nouns, verbs or adjectives, depending on the context. For instance, the trophy emoji () could stand in for the words "win," "prize," "success," "glory," or "trophy."

This blog post marks day 15 of the amazing F# Advent Calendar . Christmas is getting closer - soon we will have time to relax and perhaps read a nice book. Do you know who wrote the classic Christmas story, 'A Christmas Carol' ? All sources claim it was Charles Dickens, but how can we be sure? I'll look at how this book compares to other books he wrote in terms of the language used in the books. I'll also analyse other classic works of literature from the Victorian and Edwardian era and look at similarity of their language. In the end, I'll try to find out if it really was Charles Dickens who wrote 'A Christmas Carol'.

This is a simple data analysis project which compares and visualises some publicly available classic English books. General approach to analysis of complex data that are hard to compare directly is to describe the data using a set of characteristic features. For my literature analysis, I'll be using frequencies of pairs of letters, called bigrams. These simple features capture some characteristics of the language that different authors use.

I compute such features for a set of classic books in English. Then I use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to find how different is the language of different authors. I also use the PCA projection to visualise the data and visually explore their similarity.

Hold your "bah, humbug." Kristina Semenova, the woman doing the "translating," is turning books like "A Christmas Carol" into puzzles for kids to solve and enjoy through her company, Vaikon.

The books are rebuses: They combine normally written words with emojis that substitute for words or parts of words. So the classic opening paragraph that opens with, "Marley was dead: to begin with" becomes this:

One emoji can serve many purposes: The same symbol could indicate different nouns, verbs or adjectives, depending on the context. For instance, the trophy emoji () could stand in for the words "win," "prize," "success," "glory," or "trophy."

This blog post marks day 15 of the amazing F# Advent Calendar . Christmas is getting closer - soon we will have time to relax and perhaps read a nice book. Do you know who wrote the classic Christmas story, 'A Christmas Carol' ? All sources claim it was Charles Dickens, but how can we be sure? I'll look at how this book compares to other books he wrote in terms of the language used in the books. I'll also analyse other classic works of literature from the Victorian and Edwardian era and look at similarity of their language. In the end, I'll try to find out if it really was Charles Dickens who wrote 'A Christmas Carol'.

This is a simple data analysis project which compares and visualises some publicly available classic English books. General approach to analysis of complex data that are hard to compare directly is to describe the data using a set of characteristic features. For my literature analysis, I'll be using frequencies of pairs of letters, called bigrams. These simple features capture some characteristics of the language that different authors use.

I compute such features for a set of classic books in English. Then I use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to find how different is the language of different authors. I also use the PCA projection to visualise the data and visually explore their similarity.

Uploaded by JesseBell on September 30, 2009

Uploaded by WhitneyYoung on March 21, 2011


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