WEFOUNDI, Lucifer: The Confession


I, Lucifer is a novel written by Glen Duncan in 2003. It's told entirely from the perspective of Lucifer himself while he's inhabiting the body of one Declan Gunn . God has unexpectantly decided to offer the fallen angel a chance at redemption. The deal is simple: inhabit a mortal body for a month, remain relatively sin-free, and then you're allowed entry to paradise once more.

Lucifer accepts this proposal, but with no intention of living a quiet mortal life. Instead, he views the month of mortal existance as a "holiday" from the running of his evil enterprise, intent to indulge every imaginable pleasure of the flesh. However, in an attempt to show the world what it's like to be him, old Luce finds himself slowly learning what it is to be mortal.

A book filled to the brim with clever subversions and dark humour. This quote from critic Stella Duffy sums the book up pretty well: "Lucifer is charming and sexy and very, very funny. Glen Duncan knows way too much and says it far too well... I fear for his soul."

As one (and the last) of Lucifer ’s season two holdovers, the question about “City Of Angels?” is instantly one of how…

In the wake of last week’s phenomenal “Off The Record,” it appeared that Lucifer would just get back to season three as…

Last week, “Welcome Back, Charlotte Richards” featured a return of sorts for a Lucifer character. This week, despite…

I, Lucifer is a novel written by Glen Duncan in 2003. It's told entirely from the perspective of Lucifer himself while he's inhabiting the body of one Declan Gunn . God has unexpectantly decided to offer the fallen angel a chance at redemption. The deal is simple: inhabit a mortal body for a month, remain relatively sin-free, and then you're allowed entry to paradise once more.

Lucifer accepts this proposal, but with no intention of living a quiet mortal life. Instead, he views the month of mortal existance as a "holiday" from the running of his evil enterprise, intent to indulge every imaginable pleasure of the flesh. However, in an attempt to show the world what it's like to be him, old Luce finds himself slowly learning what it is to be mortal.

A book filled to the brim with clever subversions and dark humour. This quote from critic Stella Duffy sums the book up pretty well: "Lucifer is charming and sexy and very, very funny. Glen Duncan knows way too much and says it far too well... I fear for his soul."

As one (and the last) of Lucifer ’s season two holdovers, the question about “City Of Angels?” is instantly one of how…

In the wake of last week’s phenomenal “Off The Record,” it appeared that Lucifer would just get back to season three as…

Last week, “Welcome Back, Charlotte Richards” featured a return of sorts for a Lucifer character. This week, despite…

With last week’s “Mr. And Mrs. Mazikeen Smith,” Lucifer played with the structure of an atypical episode of the show while still managing to keep the general concept of the show’s procedural element alive. And while technically being a season two episode in a season three world. This week’s true season three episode is right back to the typical case-of-the-week structure as well as the Lucifer Morningstar focus. But funnily enough, it’s also back to the former with a much weaker approach, to the point where it’s a detriment to the latter.

By the way, in an episode where Chloe is very determined to show her worth as a detective—that leads to Pierce praising her competence and ability as such—this case doesn’t allow Chloe to actually do that. I’m not talking about how Pierce takes the bullet for her: This case is solved not because of police capability or Lucifer stumbling upon the key but because of the combination of a spoiled rich juvenile delinquent volunteering information without an ounce of pressure (see: the reveal of the “drug empire”) and her adult co-conspirator/the actual murderer going trigger happy before any fingers are truly pointed at him.

But as a cohesive episode at this level of quality, from top to bottom, “What Would Lucifer Do?” is unfortunately lacking. It’s the definition of uneven and a reminder of how the show’s procedural elements absolutely need to work in concert with its serialized elements to succeed.

I, Lucifer is a 2003 novel by Glen Duncan, told from the point of view of the eponymous fallen angel, who has taken on a human body formerly belonging to a struggling ...

01.07.2002  · I, Lucifer has 7,817 ratings and 823 reviews. Jeffrey said: ”Once upon a...Time, you’ll be pleased to know--and since one must start somewhere--was crea...

I, Lucifer: Finally, the Other Side of the Story [Glen Duncan] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The end is nigh and the Prince of Darkness has ...

Жизнь других (2006)
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I, Lucifer is a novel written by Glen Duncan in 2003. It's told entirely from the perspective of Lucifer himself while he's inhabiting the body of one Declan Gunn . God has unexpectantly decided to offer the fallen angel a chance at redemption. The deal is simple: inhabit a mortal body for a month, remain relatively sin-free, and then you're allowed entry to paradise once more.

Lucifer accepts this proposal, but with no intention of living a quiet mortal life. Instead, he views the month of mortal existance as a "holiday" from the running of his evil enterprise, intent to indulge every imaginable pleasure of the flesh. However, in an attempt to show the world what it's like to be him, old Luce finds himself slowly learning what it is to be mortal.

A book filled to the brim with clever subversions and dark humour. This quote from critic Stella Duffy sums the book up pretty well: "Lucifer is charming and sexy and very, very funny. Glen Duncan knows way too much and says it far too well... I fear for his soul."

I, Lucifer is a novel written by Glen Duncan in 2003. It's told entirely from the perspective of Lucifer himself while he's inhabiting the body of one Declan Gunn . God has unexpectantly decided to offer the fallen angel a chance at redemption. The deal is simple: inhabit a mortal body for a month, remain relatively sin-free, and then you're allowed entry to paradise once more.

Lucifer accepts this proposal, but with no intention of living a quiet mortal life. Instead, he views the month of mortal existance as a "holiday" from the running of his evil enterprise, intent to indulge every imaginable pleasure of the flesh. However, in an attempt to show the world what it's like to be him, old Luce finds himself slowly learning what it is to be mortal.

A book filled to the brim with clever subversions and dark humour. This quote from critic Stella Duffy sums the book up pretty well: "Lucifer is charming and sexy and very, very funny. Glen Duncan knows way too much and says it far too well... I fear for his soul."

As one (and the last) of Lucifer ’s season two holdovers, the question about “City Of Angels?” is instantly one of how…

In the wake of last week’s phenomenal “Off The Record,” it appeared that Lucifer would just get back to season three as…

Last week, “Welcome Back, Charlotte Richards” featured a return of sorts for a Lucifer character. This week, despite…

With last week’s “Mr. And Mrs. Mazikeen Smith,” Lucifer played with the structure of an atypical episode of the show while still managing to keep the general concept of the show’s procedural element alive. And while technically being a season two episode in a season three world. This week’s true season three episode is right back to the typical case-of-the-week structure as well as the Lucifer Morningstar focus. But funnily enough, it’s also back to the former with a much weaker approach, to the point where it’s a detriment to the latter.

By the way, in an episode where Chloe is very determined to show her worth as a detective—that leads to Pierce praising her competence and ability as such—this case doesn’t allow Chloe to actually do that. I’m not talking about how Pierce takes the bullet for her: This case is solved not because of police capability or Lucifer stumbling upon the key but because of the combination of a spoiled rich juvenile delinquent volunteering information without an ounce of pressure (see: the reveal of the “drug empire”) and her adult co-conspirator/the actual murderer going trigger happy before any fingers are truly pointed at him.

But as a cohesive episode at this level of quality, from top to bottom, “What Would Lucifer Do?” is unfortunately lacking. It’s the definition of uneven and a reminder of how the show’s procedural elements absolutely need to work in concert with its serialized elements to succeed.

I, Lucifer is a novel written by Glen Duncan in 2003. It's told entirely from the perspective of Lucifer himself while he's inhabiting the body of one Declan Gunn . God has unexpectantly decided to offer the fallen angel a chance at redemption. The deal is simple: inhabit a mortal body for a month, remain relatively sin-free, and then you're allowed entry to paradise once more.

Lucifer accepts this proposal, but with no intention of living a quiet mortal life. Instead, he views the month of mortal existance as a "holiday" from the running of his evil enterprise, intent to indulge every imaginable pleasure of the flesh. However, in an attempt to show the world what it's like to be him, old Luce finds himself slowly learning what it is to be mortal.

A book filled to the brim with clever subversions and dark humour. This quote from critic Stella Duffy sums the book up pretty well: "Lucifer is charming and sexy and very, very funny. Glen Duncan knows way too much and says it far too well... I fear for his soul."

As one (and the last) of Lucifer ’s season two holdovers, the question about “City Of Angels?” is instantly one of how…

In the wake of last week’s phenomenal “Off The Record,” it appeared that Lucifer would just get back to season three as…

Last week, “Welcome Back, Charlotte Richards” featured a return of sorts for a Lucifer character. This week, despite…

With last week’s “Mr. And Mrs. Mazikeen Smith,” Lucifer played with the structure of an atypical episode of the show while still managing to keep the general concept of the show’s procedural element alive. And while technically being a season two episode in a season three world. This week’s true season three episode is right back to the typical case-of-the-week structure as well as the Lucifer Morningstar focus. But funnily enough, it’s also back to the former with a much weaker approach, to the point where it’s a detriment to the latter.

By the way, in an episode where Chloe is very determined to show her worth as a detective—that leads to Pierce praising her competence and ability as such—this case doesn’t allow Chloe to actually do that. I’m not talking about how Pierce takes the bullet for her: This case is solved not because of police capability or Lucifer stumbling upon the key but because of the combination of a spoiled rich juvenile delinquent volunteering information without an ounce of pressure (see: the reveal of the “drug empire”) and her adult co-conspirator/the actual murderer going trigger happy before any fingers are truly pointed at him.

But as a cohesive episode at this level of quality, from top to bottom, “What Would Lucifer Do?” is unfortunately lacking. It’s the definition of uneven and a reminder of how the show’s procedural elements absolutely need to work in concert with its serialized elements to succeed.

I, Lucifer is a 2003 novel by Glen Duncan, told from the point of view of the eponymous fallen angel, who has taken on a human body formerly belonging to a struggling ...

01.07.2002  · I, Lucifer has 7,817 ratings and 823 reviews. Jeffrey said: ”Once upon a...Time, you’ll be pleased to know--and since one must start somewhere--was crea...

I, Lucifer: Finally, the Other Side of the Story [Glen Duncan] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The end is nigh and the Prince of Darkness has ...


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