WEFOUNDSwimming Scientifically Taught A Practical Manual for Young and Old


Not only is swimming fun, but it's also a great aerobic exercise. And now that the weather is warm, it's the perfect time to start swimming laps. While you might not be the next Michael Phelps, any person at any age can start swimming to increase their overall health. "Swimming is a good, whole-body exercise that has low impact for people with arthritis, musculoskeletal, or weight limitations," Robert A. Robergs , director of the exercise physiology laboratories at The University of New Mexico in Albuquerque says, "because it is low impact and can be done by people of any weight, age or physical ability."

It might not help with wrinkles or laugh lines, but swimming has been shown to cut the risk of dying by nearly 50 percent. According to a study  done by Dr. Steven Blair at the University of South Carolina, "Swimmers have the lowest death rate." The study was over the course of 32 years. The research team followed 40,000 men, ranging from 20 to 90 years old and discovered that those who swam had a 50 percent lower death rate than runners, walkers, or men who got no exercise.

Water is one the best mediums in which to increase flexibility. Some rheumatologists recommend swimming to not only increase a person's range of motion but also help to increase physical activity without causing stress on the body's joints.

We at Underwater Audio are obviously big fans of listening to music while we work out. A good soundtrack can make swimming (or any other workout) a lot more enjoyable. For some more dedicated athletes, however, a more  enjoyable  workout isn’t enough; it’s all about finding a more  effective  workout.

Well, we’ve got good news for the hardcore fitness folks in the audience: listening to music while you swim can actually provide some serious physical benefits! Read on to find out how music can help you take your swim to the next level.

Science continues to show that working out to music can statistically improve your work out. Bringing your headphones to the gym leads to a better exercising experience.

Not only is swimming fun, but it's also a great aerobic exercise. And now that the weather is warm, it's the perfect time to start swimming laps. While you might not be the next Michael Phelps, any person at any age can start swimming to increase their overall health. "Swimming is a good, whole-body exercise that has low impact for people with arthritis, musculoskeletal, or weight limitations," Robert A. Robergs , director of the exercise physiology laboratories at The University of New Mexico in Albuquerque says, "because it is low impact and can be done by people of any weight, age or physical ability."

It might not help with wrinkles or laugh lines, but swimming has been shown to cut the risk of dying by nearly 50 percent. According to a study  done by Dr. Steven Blair at the University of South Carolina, "Swimmers have the lowest death rate." The study was over the course of 32 years. The research team followed 40,000 men, ranging from 20 to 90 years old and discovered that those who swam had a 50 percent lower death rate than runners, walkers, or men who got no exercise.

Water is one the best mediums in which to increase flexibility. Some rheumatologists recommend swimming to not only increase a person's range of motion but also help to increase physical activity without causing stress on the body's joints.

We at Underwater Audio are obviously big fans of listening to music while we work out. A good soundtrack can make swimming (or any other workout) a lot more enjoyable. For some more dedicated athletes, however, a more  enjoyable  workout isn’t enough; it’s all about finding a more  effective  workout.

Well, we’ve got good news for the hardcore fitness folks in the audience: listening to music while you swim can actually provide some serious physical benefits! Read on to find out how music can help you take your swim to the next level.

Science continues to show that working out to music can statistically improve your work out. Bringing your headphones to the gym leads to a better exercising experience.

Photo: Swimming takes humans back from the land to the ocean—or the pool! You have to apply forces to move yourself through the water and other forces slow you down. Understand those forces and you can swim much more effectively. Photo by R. Jason Brunson courtesy of US Navy .

That sounds like a trivial question, but it helps to be clear. Swimming is moving your body through water (a moderately viscous fluid) that's either still (as in a swimming pool), turbulent (as in the ocean), or somewhere in between. If you're swimming completely under the surface (for example, scuba diving), you're moving through relatively still water; other times, you're going to be moving along at the more turbulent interface between air and water, with your legs, arms, head, and body moving from one element to the other and back again, speeding up or slowing down as they cross the border.

Photo: Even the best swimmers have to move along the choppy interface between air and water. It's the most inefficient place to swim, but the only place you can do it if you need to breathe air! Photo by Jennifer A. Villalovos courtesy of US Navy .

Not only is swimming fun, but it's also a great aerobic exercise. And now that the weather is warm, it's the perfect time to start swimming laps. While you might not be the next Michael Phelps, any person at any age can start swimming to increase their overall health. "Swimming is a good, whole-body exercise that has low impact for people with arthritis, musculoskeletal, or weight limitations," Robert A. Robergs , director of the exercise physiology laboratories at The University of New Mexico in Albuquerque says, "because it is low impact and can be done by people of any weight, age or physical ability."

It might not help with wrinkles or laugh lines, but swimming has been shown to cut the risk of dying by nearly 50 percent. According to a study  done by Dr. Steven Blair at the University of South Carolina, "Swimmers have the lowest death rate." The study was over the course of 32 years. The research team followed 40,000 men, ranging from 20 to 90 years old and discovered that those who swam had a 50 percent lower death rate than runners, walkers, or men who got no exercise.

Water is one the best mediums in which to increase flexibility. Some rheumatologists recommend swimming to not only increase a person's range of motion but also help to increase physical activity without causing stress on the body's joints.


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