WEFOUNDThe Red Abbey Chronicles: Maresi


Naondel , Maria Turtschaninoff’s second novel of  The Red Abbey Chronicles , is gaining acclaim. The novel’s English edition, published in 2017 by Pushkin Press, has been longlisted for the 2018 CILIP Carnegie Medal, which is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children and young people. Medal holders include C.S. Lewis, Neil Gaiman, Phillip Pullman –Turtschaninoff is definitely in esteemed company.

Maresi , the first book of the trilogy, has in the meanwhile been selected as the teen category title – though it’s also beloved of adult readers alike – for Nordic Library Week: Monday the 13th of November is “The Big Reading Aloud Day” in libraries across the Nordics and beyond.  Maresi , among two other titles, will be read out loud simultaneously, in different languages, in over 2000 places!

Additionally,  Naondel  was recently sold in Latvia. Petergailis Publishing was glad to continue  The Red Abbey Chronicles  with the publication of the second book: “Despite the horrific events of the story,  Naondel  is quiet and beautifully told,” said Kaspars Eizentals of Petergailis.

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren't allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai - tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back - arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty.

And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Good things come to those who wait. I’m not the only one who has been waiting for the next volume of the Red Abbey trilogy to be published. Luckily Marja Kyrö’s Finnish translation of Maria Turtschaninoff’s Naondel came out with …

Naondel , Maria Turtschaninoff’s second novel of  The Red Abbey Chronicles , is gaining acclaim. The novel’s English edition, published in 2017 by Pushkin Press, has been longlisted for the 2018 CILIP Carnegie Medal, which is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children and young people. Medal holders include C.S. Lewis, Neil Gaiman, Phillip Pullman –Turtschaninoff is definitely in esteemed company.

Maresi , the first book of the trilogy, has in the meanwhile been selected as the teen category title – though it’s also beloved of adult readers alike – for Nordic Library Week: Monday the 13th of November is “The Big Reading Aloud Day” in libraries across the Nordics and beyond.  Maresi , among two other titles, will be read out loud simultaneously, in different languages, in over 2000 places!

Additionally,  Naondel  was recently sold in Latvia. Petergailis Publishing was glad to continue  The Red Abbey Chronicles  with the publication of the second book: “Despite the horrific events of the story,  Naondel  is quiet and beautifully told,” said Kaspars Eizentals of Petergailis.

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren't allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai - tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back - arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty.

And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Naondel , Maria Turtschaninoff’s second novel of  The Red Abbey Chronicles , is gaining acclaim. The novel’s English edition, published in 2017 by Pushkin Press, has been longlisted for the 2018 CILIP Carnegie Medal, which is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children and young people. Medal holders include C.S. Lewis, Neil Gaiman, Phillip Pullman –Turtschaninoff is definitely in esteemed company.

Maresi , the first book of the trilogy, has in the meanwhile been selected as the teen category title – though it’s also beloved of adult readers alike – for Nordic Library Week: Monday the 13th of November is “The Big Reading Aloud Day” in libraries across the Nordics and beyond.  Maresi , among two other titles, will be read out loud simultaneously, in different languages, in over 2000 places!

Additionally,  Naondel  was recently sold in Latvia. Petergailis Publishing was glad to continue  The Red Abbey Chronicles  with the publication of the second book: “Despite the horrific events of the story,  Naondel  is quiet and beautifully told,” said Kaspars Eizentals of Petergailis.

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren't allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai - tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back - arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty.

And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Good things come to those who wait. I’m not the only one who has been waiting for the next volume of the Red Abbey trilogy to be published. Luckily Marja Kyrö’s Finnish translation of Maria Turtschaninoff’s Naondel came out with …

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren’t allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai—tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back—arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty. And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Before I start, I’m so, so sorry for missing the last two weeks! My only excuse is a combination of work and real life (though nothing major, thankfully) got in the way but I’m back on track.

Only women and girls are allowed in the Red Abbey, a haven from abuse and oppression. Maresi, a 13-year-old novice there, arrived in the hunger winter and now lives a happy life in the Abbey, protected by the Mother and reveling in the vast library in the House of Knowledge, her favorite place. Into this idyllic existence comes Jai, a girl with a dark past. She has escaped her home after witnessing the killing of her beloved sister. Soon the dangers of the outside world follow Jai into the sacred space of the Abbey.

This thrilling prequel to the award-winning Maresi explores the founding of the Red Abbey. Imprisoned in a harem by a dangerous man with a dark magic that grants him power over life and death, the First Sisters must overcome their mistrust of one another in order to escape. But they can only do so at a great cost, both for those who leave and for those left behind. Told in alternating points of view, this novel is a vivid, riveting look at a world of oppression and exploitation, the mirror opposite of the idyllic Red Abbey.

‘Incredible… if you like Louise O’Neill’s Only Ever Yours, you’ll love this’ Amber Kirk-Ford, The Mile Long Bookshelf

‘A tale of sisterhood, survival and fighting against the odds that will capture the hearts of both teen and adult feminists alike’ Lucy Powrie, Queen of Contemporary

Naondel , Maria Turtschaninoff’s second novel of  The Red Abbey Chronicles , is gaining acclaim. The novel’s English edition, published in 2017 by Pushkin Press, has been longlisted for the 2018 CILIP Carnegie Medal, which is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children and young people. Medal holders include C.S. Lewis, Neil Gaiman, Phillip Pullman –Turtschaninoff is definitely in esteemed company.

Maresi , the first book of the trilogy, has in the meanwhile been selected as the teen category title – though it’s also beloved of adult readers alike – for Nordic Library Week: Monday the 13th of November is “The Big Reading Aloud Day” in libraries across the Nordics and beyond.  Maresi , among two other titles, will be read out loud simultaneously, in different languages, in over 2000 places!

Additionally,  Naondel  was recently sold in Latvia. Petergailis Publishing was glad to continue  The Red Abbey Chronicles  with the publication of the second book: “Despite the horrific events of the story,  Naondel  is quiet and beautifully told,” said Kaspars Eizentals of Petergailis.

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren't allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai - tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back - arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty.

And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Good things come to those who wait. I’m not the only one who has been waiting for the next volume of the Red Abbey trilogy to be published. Luckily Marja Kyrö’s Finnish translation of Maria Turtschaninoff’s Naondel came out with …

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren’t allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai—tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back—arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty. And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Before I start, I’m so, so sorry for missing the last two weeks! My only excuse is a combination of work and real life (though nothing major, thankfully) got in the way but I’m back on track.

Only women and girls are allowed in the Red Abbey, a haven from abuse and oppression. Maresi, a 13-year-old novice there, arrived in the hunger winter and now lives a happy life in the Abbey, protected by the Mother and reveling in the vast library in the House of Knowledge, her favorite place. Into this idyllic existence comes Jai, a girl with a dark past. She has escaped her home after witnessing the killing of her beloved sister. Soon the dangers of the outside world follow Jai into the sacred space of the Abbey.

This thrilling prequel to the award-winning Maresi explores the founding of the Red Abbey. Imprisoned in a harem by a dangerous man with a dark magic that grants him power over life and death, the First Sisters must overcome their mistrust of one another in order to escape. But they can only do so at a great cost, both for those who leave and for those left behind. Told in alternating points of view, this novel is a vivid, riveting look at a world of oppression and exploitation, the mirror opposite of the idyllic Red Abbey.

Naondel , Maria Turtschaninoff’s second novel of  The Red Abbey Chronicles , is gaining acclaim. The novel’s English edition, published in 2017 by Pushkin Press, has been longlisted for the 2018 CILIP Carnegie Medal, which is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children and young people. Medal holders include C.S. Lewis, Neil Gaiman, Phillip Pullman –Turtschaninoff is definitely in esteemed company.

Maresi , the first book of the trilogy, has in the meanwhile been selected as the teen category title – though it’s also beloved of adult readers alike – for Nordic Library Week: Monday the 13th of November is “The Big Reading Aloud Day” in libraries across the Nordics and beyond.  Maresi , among two other titles, will be read out loud simultaneously, in different languages, in over 2000 places!

Additionally,  Naondel  was recently sold in Latvia. Petergailis Publishing was glad to continue  The Red Abbey Chronicles  with the publication of the second book: “Despite the horrific events of the story,  Naondel  is quiet and beautifully told,” said Kaspars Eizentals of Petergailis.

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren't allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai - tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back - arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty.

And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Good things come to those who wait. I’m not the only one who has been waiting for the next volume of the Red Abbey trilogy to be published. Luckily Marja Kyrö’s Finnish translation of Maria Turtschaninoff’s Naondel came out with …

Maresi came to the Red Abbey when she was thirteen, in the Hunger Winter. Before then, she had only heard rumours of its existence in secret folk tales. In a world where girls aren’t allowed to learn or do as they please, an island inhabited solely by women sounded like a fantasy. But now Maresi is here, and she knows it is real. She is safe.

Then one day Jai—tangled fair hair, clothes stiff with dirt, scars on her back—arrives on a ship. She has fled to the island to escape terrible danger and unimaginable cruelty. And the men who hurt her will stop at nothing to find her. Now the women and girls of the Red Abbey must use all their powers and ancient knowledge to combat the forces that wish to destroy them. And Maresi, haunted by her own nightmares, must confront her very deepest, darkest fears.

Before I start, I’m so, so sorry for missing the last two weeks! My only excuse is a combination of work and real life (though nothing major, thankfully) got in the way but I’m back on track.

Naondel , Maria Turtschaninoff’s second novel of  The Red Abbey Chronicles , is gaining acclaim. The novel’s English edition, published in 2017 by Pushkin Press, has been longlisted for the 2018 CILIP Carnegie Medal, which is awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children and young people. Medal holders include C.S. Lewis, Neil Gaiman, Phillip Pullman –Turtschaninoff is definitely in esteemed company.

Maresi , the first book of the trilogy, has in the meanwhile been selected as the teen category title – though it’s also beloved of adult readers alike – for Nordic Library Week: Monday the 13th of November is “The Big Reading Aloud Day” in libraries across the Nordics and beyond.  Maresi , among two other titles, will be read out loud simultaneously, in different languages, in over 2000 places!

Additionally,  Naondel  was recently sold in Latvia. Petergailis Publishing was glad to continue  The Red Abbey Chronicles  with the publication of the second book: “Despite the horrific events of the story,  Naondel  is quiet and beautifully told,” said Kaspars Eizentals of Petergailis.


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