WEFOUNDTrauma and Injury Severity Score


The spine, which serves as the weight-bearing structure of the body, is comprised of segments of bones (vertebrae) surrounding protective discs. The spine has four segments: the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral.

The basic types of spinal fractures include: 1) vertebral compression fractures, 2) vertebral burst fractures (a more serious compression fracture), and 3) fracture-dislocations, which involve significant damage to the facet joints. More minor or uncommon fractures consist of laminar or spinous process fractures (both of these structures are located in the posterior column, known as the third column of the spine). Another minor or uncommon fracture is to the transverse process. (There are two transverse processes on each side of the vertebral body).

Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are most commonly incurred as a result of osteoporosis (thinning of the bones), which is prevalent in postmenopausal women. Approximately 25 percent of U.S. females in this category are affected by a VCF. Those with osteoporosis induced VCFs are five times more likely to sustain another VCF. Due to osteoporosis, VCFs are a major concern for both elderly women and men. VCFs can also be caused by substantial trauma (e.g. automobile accident, gunshot wound or sports injury) and can be asymptomatic or entail minor symptoms.

The library houses all clinical and educational content on Trauma.org. There are several ways of finding the information you are looking for. Browse all content by the categories on the right, access the Image Gallery, Interactive Scenarios or Case Presentations using the links on the menu bar above, or use the search box on the right.

The new site allows you to participate in expanding and developing Trauma.org. You can now easily upload your own images or case presentations, comment on and contribute to the articles. This site is still in the process of development. If you have suggestions, difficulties or any other comment, please email us ( [email protected] )

Haemothorax is a collection of blood in the pleural space and may be caused by blunt or penetrating trauma. Most haemothoraces are the result of rib fractures, lung parenchymal and minor venous injuries, and as such are self-limiting. Less commonly there is an arterial injury, which is more likely to require surgical repair.

The spine, which serves as the weight-bearing structure of the body, is comprised of segments of bones (vertebrae) surrounding protective discs. The spine has four segments: the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral.

The basic types of spinal fractures include: 1) vertebral compression fractures, 2) vertebral burst fractures (a more serious compression fracture), and 3) fracture-dislocations, which involve significant damage to the facet joints. More minor or uncommon fractures consist of laminar or spinous process fractures (both of these structures are located in the posterior column, known as the third column of the spine). Another minor or uncommon fracture is to the transverse process. (There are two transverse processes on each side of the vertebral body).

Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are most commonly incurred as a result of osteoporosis (thinning of the bones), which is prevalent in postmenopausal women. Approximately 25 percent of U.S. females in this category are affected by a VCF. Those with osteoporosis induced VCFs are five times more likely to sustain another VCF. Due to osteoporosis, VCFs are a major concern for both elderly women and men. VCFs can also be caused by substantial trauma (e.g. automobile accident, gunshot wound or sports injury) and can be asymptomatic or entail minor symptoms.

The library houses all clinical and educational content on Trauma.org. There are several ways of finding the information you are looking for. Browse all content by the categories on the right, access the Image Gallery, Interactive Scenarios or Case Presentations using the links on the menu bar above, or use the search box on the right.

The new site allows you to participate in expanding and developing Trauma.org. You can now easily upload your own images or case presentations, comment on and contribute to the articles. This site is still in the process of development. If you have suggestions, difficulties or any other comment, please email us ( [email protected] )

Haemothorax is a collection of blood in the pleural space and may be caused by blunt or penetrating trauma. Most haemothoraces are the result of rib fractures, lung parenchymal and minor venous injuries, and as such are self-limiting. Less commonly there is an arterial injury, which is more likely to require surgical repair.

Psychological trauma may set in after a distressing or life-threatening event. Sufferers may develop extreme anxiety or PTSD , or they may have ongoing problems with relationships and self-esteem . But many overcome trauma, offering inspiration to others who have had life-altering negative experiences.

The spine, which serves as the weight-bearing structure of the body, is comprised of segments of bones (vertebrae) surrounding protective discs. The spine has four segments: the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral.

The basic types of spinal fractures include: 1) vertebral compression fractures, 2) vertebral burst fractures (a more serious compression fracture), and 3) fracture-dislocations, which involve significant damage to the facet joints. More minor or uncommon fractures consist of laminar or spinous process fractures (both of these structures are located in the posterior column, known as the third column of the spine). Another minor or uncommon fracture is to the transverse process. (There are two transverse processes on each side of the vertebral body).

Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are most commonly incurred as a result of osteoporosis (thinning of the bones), which is prevalent in postmenopausal women. Approximately 25 percent of U.S. females in this category are affected by a VCF. Those with osteoporosis induced VCFs are five times more likely to sustain another VCF. Due to osteoporosis, VCFs are a major concern for both elderly women and men. VCFs can also be caused by substantial trauma (e.g. automobile accident, gunshot wound or sports injury) and can be asymptomatic or entail minor symptoms.


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