WEFOUNDThe Survivors (Life After War) (Volume 1)


As every trauma patient and every incident is different, so is the recommended care plan to ensure a full recovery. After you are fully evaluated by your Trauma Team, they will communicate to you the next steps to recovery after your hospital stay. Your social worker, case manager and insurance counselor will assist you in identifying the appropriate resources available to implement your care plan.

When your post care requires additional therapies at a physical therapy center, nursing home, or other rehabilitation facility, you will be assisted in determining which facility offers the services that you need and that there is an available opening for you. Prior to your move taking place, approval must be obtained by the insurance company. If the insurance company will not cover the additional rehabilitation, other payment arrangements must be made.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is committed to principles of equal opportunity and affirmative action.
Copyright © 2018 by Vanderbilt University Medical Center

As every trauma patient and every incident is different, so is the recommended care plan to ensure a full recovery. After you are fully evaluated by your Trauma Team, they will communicate to you the next steps to recovery after your hospital stay. Your social worker, case manager and insurance counselor will assist you in identifying the appropriate resources available to implement your care plan.

When your post care requires additional therapies at a physical therapy center, nursing home, or other rehabilitation facility, you will be assisted in determining which facility offers the services that you need and that there is an available opening for you. Prior to your move taking place, approval must be obtained by the insurance company. If the insurance company will not cover the additional rehabilitation, other payment arrangements must be made.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is committed to principles of equal opportunity and affirmative action.
Copyright © 2018 by Vanderbilt University Medical Center

I have my surgery on Tuesday and am about to become a member of our group of ex-thyroid owners. Its not the surgery that bothers me, its what life will be like afterwards. I'm a runner and frequent the gym 3-4 times/week. I'm concerned that I'll loose energy and gain weight and the like. Is it possible to regulate back to pre-surgery weight and activity levels. My doctor has assured me that I'll return to my normal life but after reading some other posts, i'm not sure. What has been your experience and is there any advise you can offer?

Good Luck with your surgery .... I too have to have the right lobe of my thyroid out. I have a history of Hodgkin's Disease and have just been diagnosed with Hurthle cell neoplasm. I'll find out after surgery if it is malignant or not. I know a gentleman who does Tae Quan Doe (sp?) he had his thyroid removed years ago and stayed in good shape continuing still with his competitions. Good luck to you...: )

I am a full-time student and like you, work out many times a week. I teach aerobics so I am used to extremely difficult workouts. After I lost my thyroid, I did lose a lot of energy but I compensated for it by ensuring that I was able to get enough rest. After I got started on synthroid, things started to pick up and I am pretty much like how I was pre-cancer days. You will return to your normal life, just do not push yourself. It can be a long process because synthroid needs to be carefully tailored to each person. I just made sure that I took care of myself and I actually didn't gain weight. If you do, it is something you can deal with once you are healthy.

This is the first book of its kind to include the personal accounts of people who have survived injury to the brain, along with professional therapists' reports of their progress through rehabilitation. The paintings and stories of survivors combine with experts' discussions of the theory and practice of brain injury rehabilitation to illustrate the ups and downs that survivors encounter in their journey from pre-injury status to insult and post-injury rehabilitation.

Wilson, Winegardner and Ashworth's focus on the survivors' perspective shows how rehabilitation is an interactive process between people with brain injury, health care staff, and others, and gives the survivors the chance to tell their own stories of life before their injury, the nature of the insult, their early treatment, and subsequent rehabilitation.

Presenting practical approaches to help survivors of brain injury achieve functionally relevant and meaningful goals, Life After Brain Injury: Survivors’ Stories will help all those working in rehabilitation understand the principles involved in holistic brain injury rehabilitation and how these principles, combined with theory and models, translate into clinical practice.

As every trauma patient and every incident is different, so is the recommended care plan to ensure a full recovery. After you are fully evaluated by your Trauma Team, they will communicate to you the next steps to recovery after your hospital stay. Your social worker, case manager and insurance counselor will assist you in identifying the appropriate resources available to implement your care plan.

When your post care requires additional therapies at a physical therapy center, nursing home, or other rehabilitation facility, you will be assisted in determining which facility offers the services that you need and that there is an available opening for you. Prior to your move taking place, approval must be obtained by the insurance company. If the insurance company will not cover the additional rehabilitation, other payment arrangements must be made.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is committed to principles of equal opportunity and affirmative action.
Copyright © 2018 by Vanderbilt University Medical Center

I have my surgery on Tuesday and am about to become a member of our group of ex-thyroid owners. Its not the surgery that bothers me, its what life will be like afterwards. I'm a runner and frequent the gym 3-4 times/week. I'm concerned that I'll loose energy and gain weight and the like. Is it possible to regulate back to pre-surgery weight and activity levels. My doctor has assured me that I'll return to my normal life but after reading some other posts, i'm not sure. What has been your experience and is there any advise you can offer?

Good Luck with your surgery .... I too have to have the right lobe of my thyroid out. I have a history of Hodgkin's Disease and have just been diagnosed with Hurthle cell neoplasm. I'll find out after surgery if it is malignant or not. I know a gentleman who does Tae Quan Doe (sp?) he had his thyroid removed years ago and stayed in good shape continuing still with his competitions. Good luck to you...: )

I am a full-time student and like you, work out many times a week. I teach aerobics so I am used to extremely difficult workouts. After I lost my thyroid, I did lose a lot of energy but I compensated for it by ensuring that I was able to get enough rest. After I got started on synthroid, things started to pick up and I am pretty much like how I was pre-cancer days. You will return to your normal life, just do not push yourself. It can be a long process because synthroid needs to be carefully tailored to each person. I just made sure that I took care of myself and I actually didn't gain weight. If you do, it is something you can deal with once you are healthy.


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