WEFOUNDA History of Egypt: Volume 4, Under the Ptolemaic Dynasty (Cambridge Library Collection - Archaeology) by Mahaffy, John Pentland (2013) Paperback


Uploaded by [email protected] on October 25, 2013

The story of ancient Egypt is well known. Starting with its unification by a king called Narmer, it becomes obsessed by, then loses interest in, pyramid building, develops a huge empire ruled by any number of odd characters, then it all goes wrong with invading foreigners turning up on a regular basis. However this is not the story recounted in this, the first of John Romer's promised two-volume history of ancient Egypt, which takes us from the earliest farming communities in north-east Africa, to the building of the Great Pyramid of King Khufu.

The choice of the Great Pyramid as end-point of this first volume is, at first sight, a surprising one. Khufu's reign in the early part of the Fourth Dynasty (c. 2500 bc) seems an unlikely mid-point in a story which still has 27 Dynasties and over 2,000 years to go until the arrival of Alexander the Great.

In setting out to begin from first principles in his interpretation of the available evidence, Romer’s history is deliberately eclectic and personal and includes discussions of topics on which there is very far from being an agreed academic view, such as the extent of influence of the Mesopotamian Uruk culture in the development of standard ‘Egyptian’ cultural artefacts such as monumental architecture, writing and the display of divine kingship. However his analysis is firmly rooted in primary evidence and the latest scholarship and, written with the same panache Romer brings to broadcast media, this is a stimulating read.

Uploaded by [email protected] on October 25, 2013

The story of ancient Egypt is well known. Starting with its unification by a king called Narmer, it becomes obsessed by, then loses interest in, pyramid building, develops a huge empire ruled by any number of odd characters, then it all goes wrong with invading foreigners turning up on a regular basis. However this is not the story recounted in this, the first of John Romer's promised two-volume history of ancient Egypt, which takes us from the earliest farming communities in north-east Africa, to the building of the Great Pyramid of King Khufu.

The choice of the Great Pyramid as end-point of this first volume is, at first sight, a surprising one. Khufu's reign in the early part of the Fourth Dynasty (c. 2500 bc) seems an unlikely mid-point in a story which still has 27 Dynasties and over 2,000 years to go until the arrival of Alexander the Great.

In setting out to begin from first principles in his interpretation of the available evidence, Romer’s history is deliberately eclectic and personal and includes discussions of topics on which there is very far from being an agreed academic view, such as the extent of influence of the Mesopotamian Uruk culture in the development of standard ‘Egyptian’ cultural artefacts such as monumental architecture, writing and the display of divine kingship. However his analysis is firmly rooted in primary evidence and the latest scholarship and, written with the same panache Romer brings to broadcast media, this is a stimulating read.

Tour Egypt aims to offer the ultimate Egyptian adventure and intimate knowledge about the country. We offer this unique experience in two ways, the first one is by organizing a tour and coming to Egypt for a visit, whether alone or in a group, and living it firsthand. The second way to experience Egypt is from the comfort of your own home: online.

The information on Egyptian history is taken from a number of sources, including Sir Alan Gardiner's Egypt of the Pharaohs. Many sources are used so as to reflect a wide variety of theories and ideas about Egypt's history, particularly its early days.

Prehistory
Early Dynastic Period
Old Kingdom
First Intermediate Period
Middle Kingdom
Second Intermediate Period
New Kingdom
Third Intermediate Period
Late Kingdom
Greek Period
Roman Period
Islamic Period
French Period
British Period

Uploaded by [email protected] on October 25, 2013

Uploaded by [email protected] on October 25, 2013

The story of ancient Egypt is well known. Starting with its unification by a king called Narmer, it becomes obsessed by, then loses interest in, pyramid building, develops a huge empire ruled by any number of odd characters, then it all goes wrong with invading foreigners turning up on a regular basis. However this is not the story recounted in this, the first of John Romer's promised two-volume history of ancient Egypt, which takes us from the earliest farming communities in north-east Africa, to the building of the Great Pyramid of King Khufu.

The choice of the Great Pyramid as end-point of this first volume is, at first sight, a surprising one. Khufu's reign in the early part of the Fourth Dynasty (c. 2500 bc) seems an unlikely mid-point in a story which still has 27 Dynasties and over 2,000 years to go until the arrival of Alexander the Great.

In setting out to begin from first principles in his interpretation of the available evidence, Romer’s history is deliberately eclectic and personal and includes discussions of topics on which there is very far from being an agreed academic view, such as the extent of influence of the Mesopotamian Uruk culture in the development of standard ‘Egyptian’ cultural artefacts such as monumental architecture, writing and the display of divine kingship. However his analysis is firmly rooted in primary evidence and the latest scholarship and, written with the same panache Romer brings to broadcast media, this is a stimulating read.

Tour Egypt aims to offer the ultimate Egyptian adventure and intimate knowledge about the country. We offer this unique experience in two ways, the first one is by organizing a tour and coming to Egypt for a visit, whether alone or in a group, and living it firsthand. The second way to experience Egypt is from the comfort of your own home: online.

The information on Egyptian history is taken from a number of sources, including Sir Alan Gardiner's Egypt of the Pharaohs. Many sources are used so as to reflect a wide variety of theories and ideas about Egypt's history, particularly its early days.

Prehistory
Early Dynastic Period
Old Kingdom
First Intermediate Period
Middle Kingdom
Second Intermediate Period
New Kingdom
Third Intermediate Period
Late Kingdom
Greek Period
Roman Period
Islamic Period
French Period
British Period

The history of Egypt has been long and rich, due to the flow of the Nile river, with its fertile banks and delta . Its rich history also comes from its native inhabitants and outside influence. Much of Egypt 's ancient history was a mystery until the secrets of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs were deciphered with the discovery and help of the Rosetta Stone . The Great Pyramid of Giza is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing. The Lighthouse of Alexandria , one of the other Seven Wonders, is gone. The Library of Alexandria was the only one of its kind for centuries.

Human settlement in Egypt dates back to at least 40,000 BC with Aterian tool manufacturing. [ citation needed ] Ancient Egyptian civilization coalesced around 3150 BC with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under the first pharaoh of the First Dynasty , Narmer . Predominately native Egyptian rule lasted until the conquest by the Achaemenid Empire in the sixth century BC.

In 332 BC, Macedonian ruler Alexander the Great conquered Egypt as he toppled the Achaemenids and established the Hellenistic Ptolemaic Kingdom , whose first ruler was one of Alexander's former generals, Ptolemy I Soter . The Ptolemies had to fight native rebellions and were involved in foreign and civil wars that led to the decline of the kingdom and its final annexation by Rome . The death of Cleopatra ended the nominal independence of Egypt resulting in Egypt becoming one of the provinces of the Roman Empire. [ citation needed ]

Uploaded by [email protected] on October 25, 2013

The story of ancient Egypt is well known. Starting with its unification by a king called Narmer, it becomes obsessed by, then loses interest in, pyramid building, develops a huge empire ruled by any number of odd characters, then it all goes wrong with invading foreigners turning up on a regular basis. However this is not the story recounted in this, the first of John Romer's promised two-volume history of ancient Egypt, which takes us from the earliest farming communities in north-east Africa, to the building of the Great Pyramid of King Khufu.

The choice of the Great Pyramid as end-point of this first volume is, at first sight, a surprising one. Khufu's reign in the early part of the Fourth Dynasty (c. 2500 bc) seems an unlikely mid-point in a story which still has 27 Dynasties and over 2,000 years to go until the arrival of Alexander the Great.

In setting out to begin from first principles in his interpretation of the available evidence, Romer’s history is deliberately eclectic and personal and includes discussions of topics on which there is very far from being an agreed academic view, such as the extent of influence of the Mesopotamian Uruk culture in the development of standard ‘Egyptian’ cultural artefacts such as monumental architecture, writing and the display of divine kingship. However his analysis is firmly rooted in primary evidence and the latest scholarship and, written with the same panache Romer brings to broadcast media, this is a stimulating read.

Tour Egypt aims to offer the ultimate Egyptian adventure and intimate knowledge about the country. We offer this unique experience in two ways, the first one is by organizing a tour and coming to Egypt for a visit, whether alone or in a group, and living it firsthand. The second way to experience Egypt is from the comfort of your own home: online.

The information on Egyptian history is taken from a number of sources, including Sir Alan Gardiner's Egypt of the Pharaohs. Many sources are used so as to reflect a wide variety of theories and ideas about Egypt's history, particularly its early days.

Prehistory
Early Dynastic Period
Old Kingdom
First Intermediate Period
Middle Kingdom
Second Intermediate Period
New Kingdom
Third Intermediate Period
Late Kingdom
Greek Period
Roman Period
Islamic Period
French Period
British Period

The history of Egypt has been long and rich, due to the flow of the Nile river, with its fertile banks and delta . Its rich history also comes from its native inhabitants and outside influence. Much of Egypt 's ancient history was a mystery until the secrets of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs were deciphered with the discovery and help of the Rosetta Stone . The Great Pyramid of Giza is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing. The Lighthouse of Alexandria , one of the other Seven Wonders, is gone. The Library of Alexandria was the only one of its kind for centuries.

Human settlement in Egypt dates back to at least 40,000 BC with Aterian tool manufacturing. [ citation needed ] Ancient Egyptian civilization coalesced around 3150 BC with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under the first pharaoh of the First Dynasty , Narmer . Predominately native Egyptian rule lasted until the conquest by the Achaemenid Empire in the sixth century BC.

In 332 BC, Macedonian ruler Alexander the Great conquered Egypt as he toppled the Achaemenids and established the Hellenistic Ptolemaic Kingdom , whose first ruler was one of Alexander's former generals, Ptolemy I Soter . The Ptolemies had to fight native rebellions and were involved in foreign and civil wars that led to the decline of the kingdom and its final annexation by Rome . The death of Cleopatra ended the nominal independence of Egypt resulting in Egypt becoming one of the provinces of the Roman Empire. [ citation needed ]

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