WEFOUNDHow to Run a Meeting (Harvard Business Review Classics)


Most meetings in the modern workplace are pointless. We're meeting averse here at Zapier because we want avoid the distracting and unnecessary side meetings that happen every day in co-located teams.

That said, if done right, meetings can be an efficient way to work through potential problems and solutions. This is the case for a recurring "standup meeting" in a remote team, which gives teammates visibility into each other's activities and helps remove any roadblocks in the way of a colleague's responsibilities. It's also a nice reminder that you work with people who have personalities bigger than their group chat personas would ever show.

Over the course of Zapier's history we have revamped how we do our team standup meeting. After many—six at last count—unsuccessful iterations, we've finally found a meeting structure that drives meaningful discussion and visible results for the business.

Sometimes it’s easier to not use a password, especially when it’s just a small meeting. But if you want to prevent eavesdropping, it’s best to require a password.

After you save the meeting information, the summary information about the meeting will appear. Click the Copy button to capture the info to your clipboard. You’ll need this info to paste into the email or calendar entry you’ll use to invite meeting participants.

Whether you use Outlook, Google, or something else entirely for your scheduling needs, it doesn’t really matter. Paste the meeting info into the description or notes field of the calendar entry, and use the other calendar features to set the time, date, recurring meeting settings, and add people to invite.

What if your team could use some of the same techniques that companies like Google, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook use to streamline the way they work?

Read on to learn how to run a meeting like Google, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook and use the same core principles to make your meetings as effective as possible.

Office politics often dictate meeting decisions. An idea is adopted because it sounds good. Not that much thought is put into figuring out how well it holds up to scrutiny.

Most meetings in the modern workplace are pointless. We're meeting averse here at Zapier because we want avoid the distracting and unnecessary side meetings that happen every day in co-located teams.

That said, if done right, meetings can be an efficient way to work through potential problems and solutions. This is the case for a recurring "standup meeting" in a remote team, which gives teammates visibility into each other's activities and helps remove any roadblocks in the way of a colleague's responsibilities. It's also a nice reminder that you work with people who have personalities bigger than their group chat personas would ever show.

Over the course of Zapier's history we have revamped how we do our team standup meeting. After many—six at last count—unsuccessful iterations, we've finally found a meeting structure that drives meaningful discussion and visible results for the business.

Sometimes it’s easier to not use a password, especially when it’s just a small meeting. But if you want to prevent eavesdropping, it’s best to require a password.

After you save the meeting information, the summary information about the meeting will appear. Click the Copy button to capture the info to your clipboard. You’ll need this info to paste into the email or calendar entry you’ll use to invite meeting participants.

Whether you use Outlook, Google, or something else entirely for your scheduling needs, it doesn’t really matter. Paste the meeting info into the description or notes field of the calendar entry, and use the other calendar features to set the time, date, recurring meeting settings, and add people to invite.

Most meetings in the modern workplace are pointless. We're meeting averse here at Zapier because we want avoid the distracting and unnecessary side meetings that happen every day in co-located teams.

That said, if done right, meetings can be an efficient way to work through potential problems and solutions. This is the case for a recurring "standup meeting" in a remote team, which gives teammates visibility into each other's activities and helps remove any roadblocks in the way of a colleague's responsibilities. It's also a nice reminder that you work with people who have personalities bigger than their group chat personas would ever show.

Over the course of Zapier's history we have revamped how we do our team standup meeting. After many—six at last count—unsuccessful iterations, we've finally found a meeting structure that drives meaningful discussion and visible results for the business.


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