WEFOUNDPappus d’Alexandrie; a Collection Mathématique; oeuvre traduite pour la première fois du grec en français, avec une introd. et des notes par Paul Ver Eecke; ouvrage publié sous les auspices de la Fondation Universitaire de Belgique.


Pappus of Alexandria ( /ˈpæpəs/ ; Greek : Πάππος ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς ; c. 290 – c. 350 AD) was one of the last great Greek mathematicians of Antiquity, known for his Synagoge (Συναγωγή) or Collection (c. 340), and for Pappus's hexagon theorem in projective geometry . Nothing is known of his life, other than, (from his own writings) that he had a son named Hermodorus , and was a teacher in Alexandria .

Collection , his best-known work, is a compendium of mathematics in eight volumes, the bulk of which survives. It covers a wide range of topics, including geometry , recreational mathematics , doubling the cube , polygons and polyhedra .

Pappus was active in the 4th century AD. In a period of general stagnation in mathematical studies, he stands out as a remarkable exception. [2] "How far he was above his contemporaries, how little appreciated or understood by them, is shown by the absence of references to him in other Greek writers, and by the fact that his work had no effect in arresting the decay of mathematical science," Thomas Little Heath writes. "In this respect the fate of Pappus strikingly resembles that of Diophantus ." [2]

This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 100 years or less .

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office ) before January 1, 1923.

Pappus of Alexandria ( /ˈpæpəs/ ; Greek : Πάππος ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς ; c. 290 – c. 350 AD) was one of the last great Greek mathematicians of Antiquity, known for his Synagoge (Συναγωγή) or Collection (c. 340), and for Pappus's hexagon theorem in projective geometry . Nothing is known of his life, other than, (from his own writings) that he had a son named Hermodorus , and was a teacher in Alexandria .

Collection , his best-known work, is a compendium of mathematics in eight volumes, the bulk of which survives. It covers a wide range of topics, including geometry , recreational mathematics , doubling the cube , polygons and polyhedra .

Pappus was active in the 4th century AD. In a period of general stagnation in mathematical studies, he stands out as a remarkable exception. [2] "How far he was above his contemporaries, how little appreciated or understood by them, is shown by the absence of references to him in other Greek writers, and by the fact that his work had no effect in arresting the decay of mathematical science," Thomas Little Heath writes. "In this respect the fate of Pappus strikingly resembles that of Diophantus ." [2]