WEFOUNDTHOUGHTS OF A SERIOUS WOMAN: A Collection of Poems


May 11th, 2007 was the day that my life changed forever.  That was the day that I lost my best friend and confidante.  My mother, Dorothy Louise Martin Parris, slipped away from her earthly shell and took on a new, improved body in Heaven.  She was 82 years old.

My mother loved music– I think you can’t be a Martin and not love music!  She had a great alto voice and sang in the choir for as long as she was able to come to church.  She would still break out in song if the mood struck her after that too!  If I have any musical talent or an ear for the alto notes, it’s from listening to my mother sing my whole life!

She wasn’t perfect by any means!  She could be critical and tactless– at times, I would cringe when we had visitors over what she just might say to them!  Whatever came into her head most often came out of her mouth without filtration!  I’d just shake my head and move on…

May 11th, 2007 was the day that my life changed forever.  That was the day that I lost my best friend and confidante.  My mother, Dorothy Louise Martin Parris, slipped away from her earthly shell and took on a new, improved body in Heaven.  She was 82 years old.

My mother loved music– I think you can’t be a Martin and not love music!  She had a great alto voice and sang in the choir for as long as she was able to come to church.  She would still break out in song if the mood struck her after that too!  If I have any musical talent or an ear for the alto notes, it’s from listening to my mother sing my whole life!

She wasn’t perfect by any means!  She could be critical and tactless– at times, I would cringe when we had visitors over what she just might say to them!  Whatever came into her head most often came out of her mouth without filtration!  I’d just shake my head and move on…

I have rewritten my article on grammar rules. The new article shares almost no text with the old version (except the introduction). Overall, the advice hasn’t changed that much (spoiler: it’s okay to use grammar rules, but only a little). However, the reasoning is improved and there are many more examples. The new version also answers the following questions:

In a new page, “ Using English correctly requires a massive amount of knowledge ”, I carpet-bomb you with examples showing why speaking English without mistakes is so damn hard, and why vocabulary and so-called “grammar” are just a small part of the stuff that you have to put in your head.

Why is it so difficult to learn a language? The main reason is that speaking a language correctly requires a vast amount of knowledge – far greater than is necessary to be a competent doctor or lawyer. A large chunk of this knowledge is, of course, vocabulary. To speak English fluently, you have to know the meanings and pronunciations of at least 10,000 words and phrases (for comparison, the average college student in the US knows about 20,000 words).

Many of us have been told, "Your problems aren't that bad. They don't add up to suicide," or, "If you only took 15 pills, you weren't really serious."

We have a condition that causes others to feel uncomfortable. They reduce their discomfort by using denial, belittlement and minimization on the seriousness of our situation. While most of this denial is due to their fear concerning the possibility our death, a part of it has another source. They may also have had or be afraid of having bad periods in their own lives, and their denial on our vulnerability to suicide helps them deny their own vulnerability.

Since we have also been taught the myths of suicide, and we are not immune to social pressure, and -- like anyone else -- we fear death, we often acquiesce in this process. We can think that unless we have shot ourselves squarely in the head, we must not have a very serious condition. In the face of all this pressure, it is hard for us acknowledge that our lives are in danger.

May 11th, 2007 was the day that my life changed forever.  That was the day that I lost my best friend and confidante.  My mother, Dorothy Louise Martin Parris, slipped away from her earthly shell and took on a new, improved body in Heaven.  She was 82 years old.

My mother loved music– I think you can’t be a Martin and not love music!  She had a great alto voice and sang in the choir for as long as she was able to come to church.  She would still break out in song if the mood struck her after that too!  If I have any musical talent or an ear for the alto notes, it’s from listening to my mother sing my whole life!

She wasn’t perfect by any means!  She could be critical and tactless– at times, I would cringe when we had visitors over what she just might say to them!  Whatever came into her head most often came out of her mouth without filtration!  I’d just shake my head and move on…

I have rewritten my article on grammar rules. The new article shares almost no text with the old version (except the introduction). Overall, the advice hasn’t changed that much (spoiler: it’s okay to use grammar rules, but only a little). However, the reasoning is improved and there are many more examples. The new version also answers the following questions:

In a new page, “ Using English correctly requires a massive amount of knowledge ”, I carpet-bomb you with examples showing why speaking English without mistakes is so damn hard, and why vocabulary and so-called “grammar” are just a small part of the stuff that you have to put in your head.

Why is it so difficult to learn a language? The main reason is that speaking a language correctly requires a vast amount of knowledge – far greater than is necessary to be a competent doctor or lawyer. A large chunk of this knowledge is, of course, vocabulary. To speak English fluently, you have to know the meanings and pronunciations of at least 10,000 words and phrases (for comparison, the average college student in the US knows about 20,000 words).


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