WEFOUNDThe Royal Collection of Paintings at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, Vol. 2: Windsor Castle; Eighty Photogravures with an Introduction and Descriptive Text (Classic Reprint)


In all the millions of words that have been written about the Diamond Jubilee, one topic has not received any coverage at all: what the Queen has done for the visual arts. Received opinion tells us that she has no particular interest in art. The reasoning goes that since she has not added significantly to the Royal Collection, and because country pursuits engage her attention far more than art galleries do, she must be a philistine.

But to think that way is to confuse the interests of the Head of State with those of the private woman. That the Queen prefers horses to pictures hardly means that she knows nothing about the history of art — but it does make it all the more remarkable that during her 60 years on the throne she has done a huge amount for the visual arts in this country by extending access to the Royal Collection.

That stupendous assemblage of paintings, sculptures, prints, photography, furniture and jewels is dispersed through the public rooms and private apartments of half a dozen royal residences. But during the present Queen’s reign, an essentially static collection has been transformed into a dynamic exhibiting and lending institution that now functions much like a national museum, with three galleries open to the public in London, Edinburgh and Windsor, an exhibition programme that puts many of our publicly funded galleries to shame, and a team of professional curators second to none.

In all the millions of words that have been written about the Diamond Jubilee, one topic has not received any coverage at all: what the Queen has done for the visual arts. Received opinion tells us that she has no particular interest in art. The reasoning goes that since she has not added significantly to the Royal Collection, and because country pursuits engage her attention far more than art galleries do, she must be a philistine.

But to think that way is to confuse the interests of the Head of State with those of the private woman. That the Queen prefers horses to pictures hardly means that she knows nothing about the history of art — but it does make it all the more remarkable that during her 60 years on the throne she has done a huge amount for the visual arts in this country by extending access to the Royal Collection.

That stupendous assemblage of paintings, sculptures, prints, photography, furniture and jewels is dispersed through the public rooms and private apartments of half a dozen royal residences. But during the present Queen’s reign, an essentially static collection has been transformed into a dynamic exhibiting and lending institution that now functions much like a national museum, with three galleries open to the public in London, Edinburgh and Windsor, an exhibition programme that puts many of our publicly funded galleries to shame, and a team of professional curators second to none.

A major partnership with the BBC brings both masterpieces and lesser-known works of art from the Royal Collection to audiences across the UK.

The Royal Collection is the art collection of the British Royal Family and the largest private art collection in the world. Spread among 13 occupied and historic ...

Explore the Royal Collection online, one of the largest and most important collections in the world and one of the last great European royal collections to...

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In all the millions of words that have been written about the Diamond Jubilee, one topic has not received any coverage at all: what the Queen has done for the visual arts. Received opinion tells us that she has no particular interest in art. The reasoning goes that since she has not added significantly to the Royal Collection, and because country pursuits engage her attention far more than art galleries do, she must be a philistine.

But to think that way is to confuse the interests of the Head of State with those of the private woman. That the Queen prefers horses to pictures hardly means that she knows nothing about the history of art — but it does make it all the more remarkable that during her 60 years on the throne she has done a huge amount for the visual arts in this country by extending access to the Royal Collection.

That stupendous assemblage of paintings, sculptures, prints, photography, furniture and jewels is dispersed through the public rooms and private apartments of half a dozen royal residences. But during the present Queen’s reign, an essentially static collection has been transformed into a dynamic exhibiting and lending institution that now functions much like a national museum, with three galleries open to the public in London, Edinburgh and Windsor, an exhibition programme that puts many of our publicly funded galleries to shame, and a team of professional curators second to none.

A major partnership with the BBC brings both masterpieces and lesser-known works of art from the Royal Collection to audiences across the UK.

The Royal Collection is the art collection of the British Royal Family and the largest private art collection in the world. Spread among 13 occupied and historic ...

Explore the Royal Collection online, one of the largest and most important collections in the world and one of the last great European royal collections to...

In all the millions of words that have been written about the Diamond Jubilee, one topic has not received any coverage at all: what the Queen has done for the visual arts. Received opinion tells us that she has no particular interest in art. The reasoning goes that since she has not added significantly to the Royal Collection, and because country pursuits engage her attention far more than art galleries do, she must be a philistine.

But to think that way is to confuse the interests of the Head of State with those of the private woman. That the Queen prefers horses to pictures hardly means that she knows nothing about the history of art — but it does make it all the more remarkable that during her 60 years on the throne she has done a huge amount for the visual arts in this country by extending access to the Royal Collection.

That stupendous assemblage of paintings, sculptures, prints, photography, furniture and jewels is dispersed through the public rooms and private apartments of half a dozen royal residences. But during the present Queen’s reign, an essentially static collection has been transformed into a dynamic exhibiting and lending institution that now functions much like a national museum, with three galleries open to the public in London, Edinburgh and Windsor, an exhibition programme that puts many of our publicly funded galleries to shame, and a team of professional curators second to none.

A major partnership with the BBC brings both masterpieces and lesser-known works of art from the Royal Collection to audiences across the UK.

The Royal Collection is the art collection of the British Royal Family and the largest private art collection in the world. Spread among 13 occupied and historic ...

Explore the Royal Collection online, one of the largest and most important collections in the world and one of the last great European royal collections to...

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.
You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website.


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