WEFOUNDI Should Have Stayed Home (Midnight Classics)


Four years into writing this blog, I thought I had seen almost everything when it comes to the most common financial suicides committed by the middle class. But today I was hit in the head by a shocking realization:

When choosing between buying versus renting a house or apartment, people are making much, much worse choices than I would have thought possible.

The implications are so striking that logically, some of the world’s busiest stretches of road should not even exist. We could save millions of lives and trillions of dollars by just helping certain people operate a basic hand calculator at a beginner level. It sounds improbable, until you review the following stories from this Canadian vacation I am currently wrapping up:

On April 2, 1917, Woodrow Wilson rose before a joint session of Congress to make the case for a declaration of war on Germany. Summoning his considerable eloquence, Wilson intoned : “the right is more precious than peace,” “make the world safe for democracy,” “a universal dominion of right by a concert of free peoples,” “America is privileged to spend her blood,” and, in a conscious echo of Martin Luther, “God helping her, she can do no other.”

During the Senate’s cursory two-day debate, William J. Stone (D-Mo.), chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, warned that to enter this war would be “the greatest national blunder in history.” George W. Norris (R-Neb.) rejected Wilson’s rhetoric as moral gloss obscuring financial interests, declaring: “We are putting the dollar sign on the American flag.”

The noted Independent from Wisconsin, Robert “Fighting Bob” La Follette,  rebutted the President’s arguments in a tearful address to his colleagues that lasted four hours. If, as Wilson said, Germany was waging a war against all of humanity, how come the United States was the only neutral nation to object? If, as Wilson said, this was a war to make the world safe for democracy, how come the British refused it to the peoples of Ireland, India, Egypt? If, as Wilson said, the United States meant to wage war on a militaristic government and not on the German people, how come more Germans supported their Kaiser than Americans had voted for Wilson in 1916?

Four years into writing this blog, I thought I had seen almost everything when it comes to the most common financial suicides committed by the middle class. But today I was hit in the head by a shocking realization:

When choosing between buying versus renting a house or apartment, people are making much, much worse choices than I would have thought possible.

The implications are so striking that logically, some of the world’s busiest stretches of road should not even exist. We could save millions of lives and trillions of dollars by just helping certain people operate a basic hand calculator at a beginner level. It sounds improbable, until you review the following stories from this Canadian vacation I am currently wrapping up:

Four years into writing this blog, I thought I had seen almost everything when it comes to the most common financial suicides committed by the middle class. But today I was hit in the head by a shocking realization:

When choosing between buying versus renting a house or apartment, people are making much, much worse choices than I would have thought possible.

The implications are so striking that logically, some of the world’s busiest stretches of road should not even exist. We could save millions of lives and trillions of dollars by just helping certain people operate a basic hand calculator at a beginner level. It sounds improbable, until you review the following stories from this Canadian vacation I am currently wrapping up:

On April 2, 1917, Woodrow Wilson rose before a joint session of Congress to make the case for a declaration of war on Germany. Summoning his considerable eloquence, Wilson intoned : “the right is more precious than peace,” “make the world safe for democracy,” “a universal dominion of right by a concert of free peoples,” “America is privileged to spend her blood,” and, in a conscious echo of Martin Luther, “God helping her, she can do no other.”

During the Senate’s cursory two-day debate, William J. Stone (D-Mo.), chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, warned that to enter this war would be “the greatest national blunder in history.” George W. Norris (R-Neb.) rejected Wilson’s rhetoric as moral gloss obscuring financial interests, declaring: “We are putting the dollar sign on the American flag.”

The noted Independent from Wisconsin, Robert “Fighting Bob” La Follette,  rebutted the President’s arguments in a tearful address to his colleagues that lasted four hours. If, as Wilson said, Germany was waging a war against all of humanity, how come the United States was the only neutral nation to object? If, as Wilson said, this was a war to make the world safe for democracy, how come the British refused it to the peoples of Ireland, India, Egypt? If, as Wilson said, the United States meant to wage war on a militaristic government and not on the German people, how come more Germans supported their Kaiser than Americans had voted for Wilson in 1916?

Let's face it: most of us would love to work part-time. But few of us have that luxury. Instead, we must choose between staying at home or working full-time. Both scenarios have their pluses and their hardships. Here's a look at one of the biggest decisions you make as a mom.

It's gratifying to know your 6-month-old loves you and so does your boss. Although you cherish your family, you'll appreciate that not everything in life revolves around them. Working also keeps you in the game career-wise, helps you stay connected to the larger world, and satisfies your natural yearning for intellectual stimulation. Because, while you love your baby to bits, she doesn't read the morning paper.

Your baby won't understand the benefits of that extra paycheck, but there's another perk she will enjoy. "Our babysitter adores my children," says Holly Gordon, a New York City mother of a 3-year-old and a 1-year-old. "And I am convinced that the more people who love them, the better." You may even find that your kid learns to do things for herself earlier and faster than the kids of stay-at-home moms (though some working moms feel just the opposite!).

Hi Hannah, Thank you for taking the time to review The Beach House. We are glad you enjoyed your stay and the amenities this home has to offer. Come see us again soon! East Islands Rentals

Hi Celia, Thank you so much for taking the time to review Beach House. We are so happy to hear you continue to enjoy your time here with us! The Beach House is a wonderful family vacation home that is sure to help make family vacations memorable. See You Soon, East Islands Rentals

Hi Laura, Thank you so much for your kind words! Customer service is our priority and it is nice when someone calls attention to that. This is a wonderful beach home, comfortable and relaxing. We will let the homeowners know you suggest some painting be done. Come see us again soon!

By popular request, I've added several videos of The Atlantic Paranormal Society as the team investigates the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado. The Stanley Hotel was the inspiration behind Stephen King's novel, The Shining .

Watch as Jason Hawes, Grant Wilson, and the TAPS team explore The Stanley Hotel for evidence of paranormal activity.  Some of these videos show some very strange paranormal activity.  In Part 1, Bill Ward, the Concierge at The Stanley Hotel, explains some of the unusual activity that has been reported by guests and employees at the hotel.

In Part 2, the TAPS team begins the initial stages of the investigation, and captures evidence, including EVP recordings, and thermal and digital video recordings.  Jason has two unexplained events happen in his room while he is sleeping (both caught on film).

Four years into writing this blog, I thought I had seen almost everything when it comes to the most common financial suicides committed by the middle class. But today I was hit in the head by a shocking realization:

When choosing between buying versus renting a house or apartment, people are making much, much worse choices than I would have thought possible.

The implications are so striking that logically, some of the world’s busiest stretches of road should not even exist. We could save millions of lives and trillions of dollars by just helping certain people operate a basic hand calculator at a beginner level. It sounds improbable, until you review the following stories from this Canadian vacation I am currently wrapping up:

On April 2, 1917, Woodrow Wilson rose before a joint session of Congress to make the case for a declaration of war on Germany. Summoning his considerable eloquence, Wilson intoned : “the right is more precious than peace,” “make the world safe for democracy,” “a universal dominion of right by a concert of free peoples,” “America is privileged to spend her blood,” and, in a conscious echo of Martin Luther, “God helping her, she can do no other.”

During the Senate’s cursory two-day debate, William J. Stone (D-Mo.), chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, warned that to enter this war would be “the greatest national blunder in history.” George W. Norris (R-Neb.) rejected Wilson’s rhetoric as moral gloss obscuring financial interests, declaring: “We are putting the dollar sign on the American flag.”

The noted Independent from Wisconsin, Robert “Fighting Bob” La Follette,  rebutted the President’s arguments in a tearful address to his colleagues that lasted four hours. If, as Wilson said, Germany was waging a war against all of humanity, how come the United States was the only neutral nation to object? If, as Wilson said, this was a war to make the world safe for democracy, how come the British refused it to the peoples of Ireland, India, Egypt? If, as Wilson said, the United States meant to wage war on a militaristic government and not on the German people, how come more Germans supported their Kaiser than Americans had voted for Wilson in 1916?

Let's face it: most of us would love to work part-time. But few of us have that luxury. Instead, we must choose between staying at home or working full-time. Both scenarios have their pluses and their hardships. Here's a look at one of the biggest decisions you make as a mom.

It's gratifying to know your 6-month-old loves you and so does your boss. Although you cherish your family, you'll appreciate that not everything in life revolves around them. Working also keeps you in the game career-wise, helps you stay connected to the larger world, and satisfies your natural yearning for intellectual stimulation. Because, while you love your baby to bits, she doesn't read the morning paper.

Your baby won't understand the benefits of that extra paycheck, but there's another perk she will enjoy. "Our babysitter adores my children," says Holly Gordon, a New York City mother of a 3-year-old and a 1-year-old. "And I am convinced that the more people who love them, the better." You may even find that your kid learns to do things for herself earlier and faster than the kids of stay-at-home moms (though some working moms feel just the opposite!).

Hi Hannah, Thank you for taking the time to review The Beach House. We are glad you enjoyed your stay and the amenities this home has to offer. Come see us again soon! East Islands Rentals

Hi Celia, Thank you so much for taking the time to review Beach House. We are so happy to hear you continue to enjoy your time here with us! The Beach House is a wonderful family vacation home that is sure to help make family vacations memorable. See You Soon, East Islands Rentals

Hi Laura, Thank you so much for your kind words! Customer service is our priority and it is nice when someone calls attention to that. This is a wonderful beach home, comfortable and relaxing. We will let the homeowners know you suggest some painting be done. Come see us again soon!

Four years into writing this blog, I thought I had seen almost everything when it comes to the most common financial suicides committed by the middle class. But today I was hit in the head by a shocking realization:

When choosing between buying versus renting a house or apartment, people are making much, much worse choices than I would have thought possible.

The implications are so striking that logically, some of the world’s busiest stretches of road should not even exist. We could save millions of lives and trillions of dollars by just helping certain people operate a basic hand calculator at a beginner level. It sounds improbable, until you review the following stories from this Canadian vacation I am currently wrapping up:

On April 2, 1917, Woodrow Wilson rose before a joint session of Congress to make the case for a declaration of war on Germany. Summoning his considerable eloquence, Wilson intoned : “the right is more precious than peace,” “make the world safe for democracy,” “a universal dominion of right by a concert of free peoples,” “America is privileged to spend her blood,” and, in a conscious echo of Martin Luther, “God helping her, she can do no other.”

During the Senate’s cursory two-day debate, William J. Stone (D-Mo.), chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, warned that to enter this war would be “the greatest national blunder in history.” George W. Norris (R-Neb.) rejected Wilson’s rhetoric as moral gloss obscuring financial interests, declaring: “We are putting the dollar sign on the American flag.”

The noted Independent from Wisconsin, Robert “Fighting Bob” La Follette,  rebutted the President’s arguments in a tearful address to his colleagues that lasted four hours. If, as Wilson said, Germany was waging a war against all of humanity, how come the United States was the only neutral nation to object? If, as Wilson said, this was a war to make the world safe for democracy, how come the British refused it to the peoples of Ireland, India, Egypt? If, as Wilson said, the United States meant to wage war on a militaristic government and not on the German people, how come more Germans supported their Kaiser than Americans had voted for Wilson in 1916?

Let's face it: most of us would love to work part-time. But few of us have that luxury. Instead, we must choose between staying at home or working full-time. Both scenarios have their pluses and their hardships. Here's a look at one of the biggest decisions you make as a mom.

It's gratifying to know your 6-month-old loves you and so does your boss. Although you cherish your family, you'll appreciate that not everything in life revolves around them. Working also keeps you in the game career-wise, helps you stay connected to the larger world, and satisfies your natural yearning for intellectual stimulation. Because, while you love your baby to bits, she doesn't read the morning paper.

Your baby won't understand the benefits of that extra paycheck, but there's another perk she will enjoy. "Our babysitter adores my children," says Holly Gordon, a New York City mother of a 3-year-old and a 1-year-old. "And I am convinced that the more people who love them, the better." You may even find that your kid learns to do things for herself earlier and faster than the kids of stay-at-home moms (though some working moms feel just the opposite!).


51UqVWX8FEL