WEFOUNDTime Is the Simplest Thing


Occam's razor (also Ockham's razor or Ocham's razor ; Latin : lex parsimoniae " law of parsimony ") is the problem-solving principle that, when presented with competing hypothetical answers to a problem, one should select the one that makes the fewest assumptions. The idea is attributed to William of Ockham (c. 1287–1347), who was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian.

The origins of what has come to be known as Occam's razor are traceable to the works of earlier philosophers such as John Duns Scotus (1265–1308), Robert Grosseteste (1175–1253), Maimonides (Moses ben-Maimon, 1138–1204), and even Aristotle (384–322 BC). [9] [10] Aristotle writes in his Posterior Analytics , "We may assume the superiority ceteris paribus [other things being equal] of the demonstration which derives from fewer postulates or hypotheses." [11] Ptolemy ( c. AD 90 – c. AD 168 ) stated, "We consider it a good principle to explain the phenomena by the simplest hypothesis possible." [12]

William of Ockham ( circa 1287–1347) was an English Franciscan friar and theologian , an influential medieval philosopher and a nominalist . His popular fame as a great logician rests chiefly on the maxim attributed to him and known as Occam's razor. The term razor refers to distinguishing between two hypotheses either by "shaving away" unnecessary assumptions or cutting apart two similar conclusions.

Occam's razor (also Ockham's razor or Ocham's razor ; Latin : lex parsimoniae " law of parsimony ") is the problem-solving principle that, when presented with competing hypothetical answers to a problem, one should select the one that makes the fewest assumptions. The idea is attributed to William of Ockham (c. 1287–1347), who was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian.

The origins of what has come to be known as Occam's razor are traceable to the works of earlier philosophers such as John Duns Scotus (1265–1308), Robert Grosseteste (1175–1253), Maimonides (Moses ben-Maimon, 1138–1204), and even Aristotle (384–322 BC). [9] [10] Aristotle writes in his Posterior Analytics , "We may assume the superiority ceteris paribus [other things being equal] of the demonstration which derives from fewer postulates or hypotheses." [11] Ptolemy ( c. AD 90 – c. AD 168 ) stated, "We consider it a good principle to explain the phenomena by the simplest hypothesis possible." [12]

William of Ockham ( circa 1287–1347) was an English Franciscan friar and theologian , an influential medieval philosopher and a nominalist . His popular fame as a great logician rests chiefly on the maxim attributed to him and known as Occam's razor. The term razor refers to distinguishing between two hypotheses either by "shaving away" unnecessary assumptions or cutting apart two similar conclusions.

Time is a Simple Thing...which is actually the title of a science fiction story by Clifford D. Simak; my edition was published in 1961. Fairly unmemorable is my recollection, something that can't often be said about his work.

But in fact, time isn't simple, not in operating systems. The number of startlingly naive assumptions that I've seen made about time are astonishing. This essay attempts to clear things up.

This is the most common misconception. There is not, nor has there ever been, an attempt to make Windows a real-time operating system. If you have the slightest belief that this is possible, forget it. Windows, like most other general-purpose operating systems, has only a vague notion of time, and accuracy is not a concept it cares terribly much about. A true Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) is designed with time as its most important parameter. Any time you believe Windows might support real-time constraints, remember to recite this mantra: "Windows is not a Real Time Operating System, Windows is not a Real Time Operating System, ..." and repeat it until you understand it.

adventure , experience , exploit , happening ;

bore , bummer , bust , downer , drag ;

escapade , lark , ploy ;

Occam's razor (also Ockham's razor or Ocham's razor ; Latin : lex parsimoniae " law of parsimony ") is the problem-solving principle that, when presented with competing hypothetical answers to a problem, one should select the one that makes the fewest assumptions. The idea is attributed to William of Ockham (c. 1287–1347), who was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian.

The origins of what has come to be known as Occam's razor are traceable to the works of earlier philosophers such as John Duns Scotus (1265–1308), Robert Grosseteste (1175–1253), Maimonides (Moses ben-Maimon, 1138–1204), and even Aristotle (384–322 BC). [9] [10] Aristotle writes in his Posterior Analytics , "We may assume the superiority ceteris paribus [other things being equal] of the demonstration which derives from fewer postulates or hypotheses." [11] Ptolemy ( c. AD 90 – c. AD 168 ) stated, "We consider it a good principle to explain the phenomena by the simplest hypothesis possible." [12]

William of Ockham ( circa 1287–1347) was an English Franciscan friar and theologian , an influential medieval philosopher and a nominalist . His popular fame as a great logician rests chiefly on the maxim attributed to him and known as Occam's razor. The term razor refers to distinguishing between two hypotheses either by "shaving away" unnecessary assumptions or cutting apart two similar conclusions.

Time is a Simple Thing...which is actually the title of a science fiction story by Clifford D. Simak; my edition was published in 1961. Fairly unmemorable is my recollection, something that can't often be said about his work.

But in fact, time isn't simple, not in operating systems. The number of startlingly naive assumptions that I've seen made about time are astonishing. This essay attempts to clear things up.

This is the most common misconception. There is not, nor has there ever been, an attempt to make Windows a real-time operating system. If you have the slightest belief that this is possible, forget it. Windows, like most other general-purpose operating systems, has only a vague notion of time, and accuracy is not a concept it cares terribly much about. A true Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) is designed with time as its most important parameter. Any time you believe Windows might support real-time constraints, remember to recite this mantra: "Windows is not a Real Time Operating System, Windows is not a Real Time Operating System, ..." and repeat it until you understand it.

adventure , experience , exploit , happening ;

bore , bummer , bust , downer , drag ;

escapade , lark , ploy ;

The lost value of equipment over a period time is called depreciation. The simplest method for calculating depreciation is straight-line depreciation. The annual straight-line depreciation D of an item that costs x dollars with a useful life of n years is D=(1/n)x. Find the depreciation for items with the given characteristics. Cost is $15,966; life is 17 years. The annual straight-line depreciation is approximately $....... per year?

Occam's razor (also Ockham's razor or Ocham's razor ; Latin : lex parsimoniae " law of parsimony ") is the problem-solving principle that, when presented with competing hypothetical answers to a problem, one should select the one that makes the fewest assumptions. The idea is attributed to William of Ockham (c. 1287–1347), who was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian.

The origins of what has come to be known as Occam's razor are traceable to the works of earlier philosophers such as John Duns Scotus (1265–1308), Robert Grosseteste (1175–1253), Maimonides (Moses ben-Maimon, 1138–1204), and even Aristotle (384–322 BC). [9] [10] Aristotle writes in his Posterior Analytics , "We may assume the superiority ceteris paribus [other things being equal] of the demonstration which derives from fewer postulates or hypotheses." [11] Ptolemy ( c. AD 90 – c. AD 168 ) stated, "We consider it a good principle to explain the phenomena by the simplest hypothesis possible." [12]

William of Ockham ( circa 1287–1347) was an English Franciscan friar and theologian , an influential medieval philosopher and a nominalist . His popular fame as a great logician rests chiefly on the maxim attributed to him and known as Occam's razor. The term razor refers to distinguishing between two hypotheses either by "shaving away" unnecessary assumptions or cutting apart two similar conclusions.

Time is a Simple Thing...which is actually the title of a science fiction story by Clifford D. Simak; my edition was published in 1961. Fairly unmemorable is my recollection, something that can't often be said about his work.

But in fact, time isn't simple, not in operating systems. The number of startlingly naive assumptions that I've seen made about time are astonishing. This essay attempts to clear things up.

This is the most common misconception. There is not, nor has there ever been, an attempt to make Windows a real-time operating system. If you have the slightest belief that this is possible, forget it. Windows, like most other general-purpose operating systems, has only a vague notion of time, and accuracy is not a concept it cares terribly much about. A true Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) is designed with time as its most important parameter. Any time you believe Windows might support real-time constraints, remember to recite this mantra: "Windows is not a Real Time Operating System, Windows is not a Real Time Operating System, ..." and repeat it until you understand it.


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