WEFOUNDNew German Cooking: Recipes for Classics Revisited by Nolen, Jeremy, Nolen, Jessica (27 January, 2015) Hardcover


It took a publishing-world nanosecond for the customer feedback about “ New German Cooking ” that Jeremy Nolen had been dreading to appear online: “as a Pennsylvania Dutch descendant . . . having lived in Germany . . . a total let down.”

Never mind that the first word in the book’s title ought to have been a tip-off. As it happens, Jeremy Nolen grew up near Reading, Pa., helping his chef dad cook at the local German festivals. At age 19, he learned the classics from immigrant women in their 70s and 80s who produced the likes of sauerbraten and rolled beef for the private German club in Nolen’s hometown.

The 37-year-old chef and his pastry-chef wife, Jessica, 28, managed to write and test their recipes at home in a mere eight months while working at their Brauhaus Schmitz and Wurst Schmitz restaurants in Philadelphia. Their goal for their first cookbook was to demonstrate an evolutionary approach to the cuisine: seasonal, technique-driven, not heavy. He knew that some traditionalists would not be on board. “That lighter approach works against us,” he says.

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Jeremy and Jessica Nolen are the husband-and-wife chef team behind Brauhaus Schmitz. They live in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The cuisine of Germany has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region.

Some regions of Germany , like Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia , share dishes with Austrian and parts of Swiss cuisine . [1]

The Michelin Guide of 2015 awarded eleven restaurants in Germany three stars , the highest designation, while 38 more received two stars and 233 one star. [2] German restaurants have become the world's second-most decorated after France. [3] [4]

It took a publishing-world nanosecond for the customer feedback about “ New German Cooking ” that Jeremy Nolen had been dreading to appear online: “as a Pennsylvania Dutch descendant . . . having lived in Germany . . . a total let down.”

Never mind that the first word in the book’s title ought to have been a tip-off. As it happens, Jeremy Nolen grew up near Reading, Pa., helping his chef dad cook at the local German festivals. At age 19, he learned the classics from immigrant women in their 70s and 80s who produced the likes of sauerbraten and rolled beef for the private German club in Nolen’s hometown.

The 37-year-old chef and his pastry-chef wife, Jessica, 28, managed to write and test their recipes at home in a mere eight months while working at their Brauhaus Schmitz and Wurst Schmitz restaurants in Philadelphia. Their goal for their first cookbook was to demonstrate an evolutionary approach to the cuisine: seasonal, technique-driven, not heavy. He knew that some traditionalists would not be on board. “That lighter approach works against us,” he says.

It took a publishing-world nanosecond for the customer feedback about “ New German Cooking ” that Jeremy Nolen had been dreading to appear online: “as a Pennsylvania Dutch descendant . . . having lived in Germany . . . a total let down.”

Never mind that the first word in the book’s title ought to have been a tip-off. As it happens, Jeremy Nolen grew up near Reading, Pa., helping his chef dad cook at the local German festivals. At age 19, he learned the classics from immigrant women in their 70s and 80s who produced the likes of sauerbraten and rolled beef for the private German club in Nolen’s hometown.

The 37-year-old chef and his pastry-chef wife, Jessica, 28, managed to write and test their recipes at home in a mere eight months while working at their Brauhaus Schmitz and Wurst Schmitz restaurants in Philadelphia. Their goal for their first cookbook was to demonstrate an evolutionary approach to the cuisine: seasonal, technique-driven, not heavy. He knew that some traditionalists would not be on board. “That lighter approach works against us,” he says.

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Jeremy and Jessica Nolen are the husband-and-wife chef team behind Brauhaus Schmitz. They live in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

It took a publishing-world nanosecond for the customer feedback about “ New German Cooking ” that Jeremy Nolen had been dreading to appear online: “as a Pennsylvania Dutch descendant . . . having lived in Germany . . . a total let down.”

Never mind that the first word in the book’s title ought to have been a tip-off. As it happens, Jeremy Nolen grew up near Reading, Pa., helping his chef dad cook at the local German festivals. At age 19, he learned the classics from immigrant women in their 70s and 80s who produced the likes of sauerbraten and rolled beef for the private German club in Nolen’s hometown.

The 37-year-old chef and his pastry-chef wife, Jessica, 28, managed to write and test their recipes at home in a mere eight months while working at their Brauhaus Schmitz and Wurst Schmitz restaurants in Philadelphia. Their goal for their first cookbook was to demonstrate an evolutionary approach to the cuisine: seasonal, technique-driven, not heavy. He knew that some traditionalists would not be on board. “That lighter approach works against us,” he says.

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Jeremy and Jessica Nolen are the husband-and-wife chef team behind Brauhaus Schmitz. They live in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The cuisine of Germany has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region.

Some regions of Germany , like Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia , share dishes with Austrian and parts of Swiss cuisine . [1]

The Michelin Guide of 2015 awarded eleven restaurants in Germany three stars , the highest designation, while 38 more received two stars and 233 one star. [2] German restaurants have become the world's second-most decorated after France. [3] [4]

Bratwurst. Spätzle. Sauerkraut. Weisswurst. Schnitzel. These are the classic German foods we can all readily identify. But there’s more to the cuisine than the traditional hearty, meaty dishes that we’ve been conditioned to expect.

Consider the pilzstrudel — a strudel stuffed with wild mushrooms and smoked barley — which is entirely vegetarian-friendly and served with roasted carrots. Yes, you read that correctly: a completely meatless German dish devoid of any sauerkraut on the side. Or how about a fresh salad with forelle (smoked trout), asparagus, and radishes tossed in a horseradish dressing? While it might sound a bit farm-to-table, German cuisine is no stranger to seafood or salads.

“German food is more than just sausages, schnitzel, and sauerkraut,” said Jeremy Nolen, chef at Brauhaus Schmitz in Philadelphia.

It took a publishing-world nanosecond for the customer feedback about “ New German Cooking ” that Jeremy Nolen had been dreading to appear online: “as a Pennsylvania Dutch descendant . . . having lived in Germany . . . a total let down.”

Never mind that the first word in the book’s title ought to have been a tip-off. As it happens, Jeremy Nolen grew up near Reading, Pa., helping his chef dad cook at the local German festivals. At age 19, he learned the classics from immigrant women in their 70s and 80s who produced the likes of sauerbraten and rolled beef for the private German club in Nolen’s hometown.

The 37-year-old chef and his pastry-chef wife, Jessica, 28, managed to write and test their recipes at home in a mere eight months while working at their Brauhaus Schmitz and Wurst Schmitz restaurants in Philadelphia. Their goal for their first cookbook was to demonstrate an evolutionary approach to the cuisine: seasonal, technique-driven, not heavy. He knew that some traditionalists would not be on board. “That lighter approach works against us,” he says.

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection


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