WEFOUNDThe Shorter Aeneid: Selected and Arranged With Brief Notes (Classic Reprint)


Obverse: VIRTVS CARAVSI AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: CARAVSIVS P F AVG or MAXIMIANVS P F AVG AD 292-293 Gold aurei   |  
ML Obverse: IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG AD 293- 294 Gold aurei   |  
ML AD 295 Gold aurei   |  
MSL

LEGI I MIN(ervia)
LEG II AVG(usta)
LEG II PARTH(ica)
LEG IIII FL(avia)
LEG VII CLA(udia)
LEG VIII AVG(usta)
LEG IIXX PRIMIG(enia)
LEG XX VV (Valeria Victrix)
LEG XXX VLPIA VI(ictrix)

Also:
COHRT PRAET Ram
Capricorn
Centaur
Lion
Bull
Bull
Capricorn
Boar
Neptune

A legend is a tale regarded as historical even though it has not been proven, and the term “myth” can refer to common yet false ideas.  Many myths and legends describe our history, but they are often treated skeptically. This is because many of them, while explaining a phenomenon, involve divine or supernatural beings. However, despite the fact that many disbelieve such stories, they do not disappear; they are passed down to future generations.  Some parents tell their children that the stories are true.  Others explain that they are likely untrue but important.  And for human beings, they are significant. 

Mention that an individual named Marco Polo who went to China in the 1200s likely did not exist and people will get angry. They will lie and use deceit to try to prove he existed, even though outside of one book written by the fiction author Rustichello da Pisa, there is no evidence of his existence. What is it about people that makes his existence important?  It is the desire to “know” history, and because of this need, willful blindness appears. 

Similarly, evidence exists that suggests human beings are millions of years old, but since this is not the history most people learned in school, they are generally opposed to it.  Because of such opposition, views of history are distorted, likely untrue, and ethnocentric.  How could Christopher Columbus have discovered the Americas if there were already millions of people there?  Most students don’t even know what he was called (Colón), despite the fact that some countries’ money is named after him (colónes).

There's a moment in Virgil's "Aeneid" when the Trojan forces are massed like "a cloudburst wiping out the sun, sweeping over the seas toward land." It's an image that evokes another army, likewise intimidating, although this one's composed chiefly of sedentary men, white-haired and bespectacled. Their numbers, too, are unreckonable -- those squadrons of scholars who have, over the centuries, translated the "Aeneid."

Has any book been recast into English more times than this tale of Aeneas' wanderings and the eventual establishment of the Roman Empire? Probably not, given both the poem's venerability and the relative accessibility of Latin. When you further consider all the partial or complete versions in private manuscript -- often the work of old classics teachers, shared with their students -- we indeed confront something that looms over us like a cloudburst.

Robert Fagles, the poem's newest translator, comes to the fray well armed. An emeritus professor of comparative literature at Princeton, he has already translated, with great success, Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey." And his publisher for the "Aeneid," Viking, has accoutered him handsomely, with a clear map, a useful pronunciation glossary, and a harmonious blend of layout and type font and binding.

Obverse: VIRTVS CARAVSI AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: CARAVSIVS P F AVG or MAXIMIANVS P F AVG AD 292-293 Gold aurei   |  
ML Obverse: IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG AD 293- 294 Gold aurei   |  
ML AD 295 Gold aurei   |  
MSL

LEGI I MIN(ervia)
LEG II AVG(usta)
LEG II PARTH(ica)
LEG IIII FL(avia)
LEG VII CLA(udia)
LEG VIII AVG(usta)
LEG IIXX PRIMIG(enia)
LEG XX VV (Valeria Victrix)
LEG XXX VLPIA VI(ictrix)

Also:
COHRT PRAET Ram
Capricorn
Centaur
Lion
Bull
Bull
Capricorn
Boar
Neptune

A legend is a tale regarded as historical even though it has not been proven, and the term “myth” can refer to common yet false ideas.  Many myths and legends describe our history, but they are often treated skeptically. This is because many of them, while explaining a phenomenon, involve divine or supernatural beings. However, despite the fact that many disbelieve such stories, they do not disappear; they are passed down to future generations.  Some parents tell their children that the stories are true.  Others explain that they are likely untrue but important.  And for human beings, they are significant. 

Mention that an individual named Marco Polo who went to China in the 1200s likely did not exist and people will get angry. They will lie and use deceit to try to prove he existed, even though outside of one book written by the fiction author Rustichello da Pisa, there is no evidence of his existence. What is it about people that makes his existence important?  It is the desire to “know” history, and because of this need, willful blindness appears. 

Similarly, evidence exists that suggests human beings are millions of years old, but since this is not the history most people learned in school, they are generally opposed to it.  Because of such opposition, views of history are distorted, likely untrue, and ethnocentric.  How could Christopher Columbus have discovered the Americas if there were already millions of people there?  Most students don’t even know what he was called (Colón), despite the fact that some countries’ money is named after him (colónes).

There's a moment in Virgil's "Aeneid" when the Trojan forces are massed like "a cloudburst wiping out the sun, sweeping over the seas toward land." It's an image that evokes another army, likewise intimidating, although this one's composed chiefly of sedentary men, white-haired and bespectacled. Their numbers, too, are unreckonable -- those squadrons of scholars who have, over the centuries, translated the "Aeneid."

Has any book been recast into English more times than this tale of Aeneas' wanderings and the eventual establishment of the Roman Empire? Probably not, given both the poem's venerability and the relative accessibility of Latin. When you further consider all the partial or complete versions in private manuscript -- often the work of old classics teachers, shared with their students -- we indeed confront something that looms over us like a cloudburst.

Robert Fagles, the poem's newest translator, comes to the fray well armed. An emeritus professor of comparative literature at Princeton, he has already translated, with great success, Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey." And his publisher for the "Aeneid," Viking, has accoutered him handsomely, with a clear map, a useful pronunciation glossary, and a harmonious blend of layout and type font and binding.

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Obverse: VIRTVS CARAVSI AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: CARAVSIVS P F AVG or MAXIMIANVS P F AVG AD 292-293 Gold aurei   |  
ML Obverse: IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG AD 293- 294 Gold aurei   |  
ML AD 295 Gold aurei   |  
MSL

LEGI I MIN(ervia)
LEG II AVG(usta)
LEG II PARTH(ica)
LEG IIII FL(avia)
LEG VII CLA(udia)
LEG VIII AVG(usta)
LEG IIXX PRIMIG(enia)
LEG XX VV (Valeria Victrix)
LEG XXX VLPIA VI(ictrix)

Also:
COHRT PRAET Ram
Capricorn
Centaur
Lion
Bull
Bull
Capricorn
Boar
Neptune

Obverse: VIRTVS CARAVSI AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG AD 291 Gold aurei   |   Obverse: CARAVSIVS P F AVG or MAXIMIANVS P F AVG AD 292-293 Gold aurei   |  
ML Obverse: IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG AD 293- 294 Gold aurei   |  
ML AD 295 Gold aurei   |  
MSL

LEGI I MIN(ervia)
LEG II AVG(usta)
LEG II PARTH(ica)
LEG IIII FL(avia)
LEG VII CLA(udia)
LEG VIII AVG(usta)
LEG IIXX PRIMIG(enia)
LEG XX VV (Valeria Victrix)
LEG XXX VLPIA VI(ictrix)

Also:
COHRT PRAET Ram
Capricorn
Centaur
Lion
Bull
Bull
Capricorn
Boar
Neptune

A legend is a tale regarded as historical even though it has not been proven, and the term “myth” can refer to common yet false ideas.  Many myths and legends describe our history, but they are often treated skeptically. This is because many of them, while explaining a phenomenon, involve divine or supernatural beings. However, despite the fact that many disbelieve such stories, they do not disappear; they are passed down to future generations.  Some parents tell their children that the stories are true.  Others explain that they are likely untrue but important.  And for human beings, they are significant. 

Mention that an individual named Marco Polo who went to China in the 1200s likely did not exist and people will get angry. They will lie and use deceit to try to prove he existed, even though outside of one book written by the fiction author Rustichello da Pisa, there is no evidence of his existence. What is it about people that makes his existence important?  It is the desire to “know” history, and because of this need, willful blindness appears. 

Similarly, evidence exists that suggests human beings are millions of years old, but since this is not the history most people learned in school, they are generally opposed to it.  Because of such opposition, views of history are distorted, likely untrue, and ethnocentric.  How could Christopher Columbus have discovered the Americas if there were already millions of people there?  Most students don’t even know what he was called (Colón), despite the fact that some countries’ money is named after him (colónes).


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