WEFOUNDWestern Civilization Ideas, Politics, and Society, Volume I To 1789


The ITN “The History of Human Freedom and Dignity in Western Civilization” is a research collaboration between 6 universities and 9 non-academic partner organizations across Europe. The project will trace the historical roots and transformations of the modern conception of humans as dignified and free beings, especially as met with in theological and philosophical traditions.

The ITN is a collaboration between Aarhus University, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Martin Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Univerzita Karlova v Praze, and University of Reading.

In addition to these six universities, the ITN cooperates closely with nine non-academic partner organizations: Mohr Siebeck Verlag, Franckesche Stiftungen zu Halle, Verlag Walter de Gruyter, Lutheran Church of Middle Germany, Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, Aschendorff Verlag, Dar al-Kalima College of Arts and Culture, The Diocese of Pécs, Christian Heritage Institute, and Etikos Aps.

The Washington Post headlined an opinion piece from editorial board member Jonathan Capehart “Trump’s white-nationalist dog whistles in Warsaw.” Capehart’s biggest gripe centers around the section where Trump touted Western accomplishments and that began with the line, “We write symphonies.”

“What on Earth does that have to do with anything?” Capehart wrote. “…In that one line, taken in context with everything else Trump said, what I heard was the loudest of dog whistles. A familiar boast that swells the chests of white nationalists everywhere.”

The Atlantic picked up where The Post left off, with an article called “The Racial and Religious Paranoia of Trump’s Warsaw Speech.”

Class Time: MWF 9:30-10:20am
Class Location: David King Jr. Hall 2053
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ammon Shepherd
Email: [email protected]
Office: Research Hall 484
Office Hours: MF 11:00am – 12:00pm (or anytime by appointment)
Course Website: http://rrchnm.org/courses/western-civ/
Western-Civ-Fall2013-Syllabus [pdf]

“We see the world, not as it is, but as we are—or, as we are conditioned to see it.”
― Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

How we understand the world around us today is influenced by the “filters” or “lenses” with which we view events and experiences. This is also true of how we understand the past. History, believe it or not, is interpreted differently by each person. During this course we will look at the history of “Western Civilization” through different filters to interpret our understanding of what happened and why. We will try to determine what “Western” and “Civilization” mean. We will also learn how to look at primary and secondary sources critically, and practice creating a defined argument based on our interpretation of sources.

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The ITN “The History of Human Freedom and Dignity in Western Civilization” is a research collaboration between 6 universities and 9 non-academic partner organizations across Europe. The project will trace the historical roots and transformations of the modern conception of humans as dignified and free beings, especially as met with in theological and philosophical traditions.

The ITN is a collaboration between Aarhus University, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Martin Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Univerzita Karlova v Praze, and University of Reading.

In addition to these six universities, the ITN cooperates closely with nine non-academic partner organizations: Mohr Siebeck Verlag, Franckesche Stiftungen zu Halle, Verlag Walter de Gruyter, Lutheran Church of Middle Germany, Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, Aschendorff Verlag, Dar al-Kalima College of Arts and Culture, The Diocese of Pécs, Christian Heritage Institute, and Etikos Aps.

The ITN “The History of Human Freedom and Dignity in Western Civilization” is a research collaboration between 6 universities and 9 non-academic partner organizations across Europe. The project will trace the historical roots and transformations of the modern conception of humans as dignified and free beings, especially as met with in theological and philosophical traditions.

The ITN is a collaboration between Aarhus University, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Martin Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Univerzita Karlova v Praze, and University of Reading.

In addition to these six universities, the ITN cooperates closely with nine non-academic partner organizations: Mohr Siebeck Verlag, Franckesche Stiftungen zu Halle, Verlag Walter de Gruyter, Lutheran Church of Middle Germany, Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, Aschendorff Verlag, Dar al-Kalima College of Arts and Culture, The Diocese of Pécs, Christian Heritage Institute, and Etikos Aps.

The Washington Post headlined an opinion piece from editorial board member Jonathan Capehart “Trump’s white-nationalist dog whistles in Warsaw.” Capehart’s biggest gripe centers around the section where Trump touted Western accomplishments and that began with the line, “We write symphonies.”

“What on Earth does that have to do with anything?” Capehart wrote. “…In that one line, taken in context with everything else Trump said, what I heard was the loudest of dog whistles. A familiar boast that swells the chests of white nationalists everywhere.”

The Atlantic picked up where The Post left off, with an article called “The Racial and Religious Paranoia of Trump’s Warsaw Speech.”

The ITN “The History of Human Freedom and Dignity in Western Civilization” is a research collaboration between 6 universities and 9 non-academic partner organizations across Europe. The project will trace the historical roots and transformations of the modern conception of humans as dignified and free beings, especially as met with in theological and philosophical traditions.

The ITN is a collaboration between Aarhus University, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Martin Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Univerzita Karlova v Praze, and University of Reading.

In addition to these six universities, the ITN cooperates closely with nine non-academic partner organizations: Mohr Siebeck Verlag, Franckesche Stiftungen zu Halle, Verlag Walter de Gruyter, Lutheran Church of Middle Germany, Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, Aschendorff Verlag, Dar al-Kalima College of Arts and Culture, The Diocese of Pécs, Christian Heritage Institute, and Etikos Aps.

The Washington Post headlined an opinion piece from editorial board member Jonathan Capehart “Trump’s white-nationalist dog whistles in Warsaw.” Capehart’s biggest gripe centers around the section where Trump touted Western accomplishments and that began with the line, “We write symphonies.”

“What on Earth does that have to do with anything?” Capehart wrote. “…In that one line, taken in context with everything else Trump said, what I heard was the loudest of dog whistles. A familiar boast that swells the chests of white nationalists everywhere.”

The Atlantic picked up where The Post left off, with an article called “The Racial and Religious Paranoia of Trump’s Warsaw Speech.”

Class Time: MWF 9:30-10:20am
Class Location: David King Jr. Hall 2053
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ammon Shepherd
Email: [email protected]
Office: Research Hall 484
Office Hours: MF 11:00am – 12:00pm (or anytime by appointment)
Course Website: http://rrchnm.org/courses/western-civ/
Western-Civ-Fall2013-Syllabus [pdf]

“We see the world, not as it is, but as we are—or, as we are conditioned to see it.”
― Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

How we understand the world around us today is influenced by the “filters” or “lenses” with which we view events and experiences. This is also true of how we understand the past. History, believe it or not, is interpreted differently by each person. During this course we will look at the history of “Western Civilization” through different filters to interpret our understanding of what happened and why. We will try to determine what “Western” and “Civilization” mean. We will also learn how to look at primary and secondary sources critically, and practice creating a defined argument based on our interpretation of sources.

The ITN “The History of Human Freedom and Dignity in Western Civilization” is a research collaboration between 6 universities and 9 non-academic partner organizations across Europe. The project will trace the historical roots and transformations of the modern conception of humans as dignified and free beings, especially as met with in theological and philosophical traditions.

The ITN is a collaboration between Aarhus University, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Martin Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Univerzita Karlova v Praze, and University of Reading.

In addition to these six universities, the ITN cooperates closely with nine non-academic partner organizations: Mohr Siebeck Verlag, Franckesche Stiftungen zu Halle, Verlag Walter de Gruyter, Lutheran Church of Middle Germany, Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, Aschendorff Verlag, Dar al-Kalima College of Arts and Culture, The Diocese of Pécs, Christian Heritage Institute, and Etikos Aps.

The Washington Post headlined an opinion piece from editorial board member Jonathan Capehart “Trump’s white-nationalist dog whistles in Warsaw.” Capehart’s biggest gripe centers around the section where Trump touted Western accomplishments and that began with the line, “We write symphonies.”

“What on Earth does that have to do with anything?” Capehart wrote. “…In that one line, taken in context with everything else Trump said, what I heard was the loudest of dog whistles. A familiar boast that swells the chests of white nationalists everywhere.”

The Atlantic picked up where The Post left off, with an article called “The Racial and Religious Paranoia of Trump’s Warsaw Speech.”

Class Time: MWF 9:30-10:20am
Class Location: David King Jr. Hall 2053
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ammon Shepherd
Email: [email protected]
Office: Research Hall 484
Office Hours: MF 11:00am – 12:00pm (or anytime by appointment)
Course Website: http://rrchnm.org/courses/western-civ/
Western-Civ-Fall2013-Syllabus [pdf]

“We see the world, not as it is, but as we are—or, as we are conditioned to see it.”
― Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

How we understand the world around us today is influenced by the “filters” or “lenses” with which we view events and experiences. This is also true of how we understand the past. History, believe it or not, is interpreted differently by each person. During this course we will look at the history of “Western Civilization” through different filters to interpret our understanding of what happened and why. We will try to determine what “Western” and “Civilization” mean. We will also learn how to look at primary and secondary sources critically, and practice creating a defined argument based on our interpretation of sources.

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Loving life? Well, lap it up because the days of driving around in comfy cars, feasting on fancy food and enjoying an air conditioner-cooled existence could be numbered.

With rising population, depleting natural resources and stretching social divide, civilization could be facing collapse within the next few decades, according to a scientific study funded by NASA. And if you think this is a load of scaremongering, it’s happened before. Remember the Roman Empire?

In the report conducted by applied mathematician Safa Motesharri, his “Human And Nature Dynamical” (Handy) model claims “the process of rise-and-collapse is actually a recurrent cycle found throughout history.”


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