WEFOUNDEyewitness: Time and Space Eyewitness Books


A group of suicide bombers killed dozens and wounded more than 230 people at Istanbul’s main airport on Tuesday night, the latest and most devastating in a series of terrorist attacks in Turkey, a country that has become the new front line in the battle against terrorism.

Shortly before 10 p.m., gunfire and explosions ripped through the terminal of one of the busiest airports in the world, sending hundreds of panicked passengers running. Video captured a flash of explosions in an attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport that killed at least 41 people, according to Turkish officials cited by news reports. While Turkey has experienced a string of recent terrorist attacks — including inside Istanbul, the country’s commercial capital — Tuesday’s shootings and bombing targeted the heart of the country’s civilian infrastructure.

Stunned passengers at the airport described a chaotic scene as they emerged from the terminal roughly an hour after the attack. Witnesses said at least two explosions took place, while others reported seeing and hearing gunfire. At least three attackers were killed, according to the Turkish authorities.

There are two points to bear in mind when examining the relationship between eyewitness memory and exposure duration. First, eyewitnesses are not very good at making estimates of the duration of a given event, and witnesses may overestimate the length of exposure to a face. Second, a longer exposure to a face can make a witness more confident in their ability to make an identification, although there are numerous other factors that could inflate (or deflate) a witness’s confidence.

When witnesses are asked whether or not they could identify someone seen earlier, they will rely on various sources of information when making a judgment about the strength of their memory. One source of information that could influence their decision is “availability” or the ease with which information can be brought to mind. A longer exposure is associated with an increase in availability, and this can have interesting consequences for the accuracy of an eyewitness’s identification.

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A group of suicide bombers killed dozens and wounded more than 230 people at Istanbul’s main airport on Tuesday night, the latest and most devastating in a series of terrorist attacks in Turkey, a country that has become the new front line in the battle against terrorism.

Shortly before 10 p.m., gunfire and explosions ripped through the terminal of one of the busiest airports in the world, sending hundreds of panicked passengers running. Video captured a flash of explosions in an attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport that killed at least 41 people, according to Turkish officials cited by news reports. While Turkey has experienced a string of recent terrorist attacks — including inside Istanbul, the country’s commercial capital — Tuesday’s shootings and bombing targeted the heart of the country’s civilian infrastructure.

Stunned passengers at the airport described a chaotic scene as they emerged from the terminal roughly an hour after the attack. Witnesses said at least two explosions took place, while others reported seeing and hearing gunfire. At least three attackers were killed, according to the Turkish authorities.

There are two points to bear in mind when examining the relationship between eyewitness memory and exposure duration. First, eyewitnesses are not very good at making estimates of the duration of a given event, and witnesses may overestimate the length of exposure to a face. Second, a longer exposure to a face can make a witness more confident in their ability to make an identification, although there are numerous other factors that could inflate (or deflate) a witness’s confidence.

When witnesses are asked whether or not they could identify someone seen earlier, they will rely on various sources of information when making a judgment about the strength of their memory. One source of information that could influence their decision is “availability” or the ease with which information can be brought to mind. A longer exposure is associated with an increase in availability, and this can have interesting consequences for the accuracy of an eyewitness’s identification.

A group of suicide bombers killed dozens and wounded more than 230 people at Istanbul’s main airport on Tuesday night, the latest and most devastating in a series of terrorist attacks in Turkey, a country that has become the new front line in the battle against terrorism.

Shortly before 10 p.m., gunfire and explosions ripped through the terminal of one of the busiest airports in the world, sending hundreds of panicked passengers running. Video captured a flash of explosions in an attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport that killed at least 41 people, according to Turkish officials cited by news reports. While Turkey has experienced a string of recent terrorist attacks — including inside Istanbul, the country’s commercial capital — Tuesday’s shootings and bombing targeted the heart of the country’s civilian infrastructure.

Stunned passengers at the airport described a chaotic scene as they emerged from the terminal roughly an hour after the attack. Witnesses said at least two explosions took place, while others reported seeing and hearing gunfire. At least three attackers were killed, according to the Turkish authorities.

There are two points to bear in mind when examining the relationship between eyewitness memory and exposure duration. First, eyewitnesses are not very good at making estimates of the duration of a given event, and witnesses may overestimate the length of exposure to a face. Second, a longer exposure to a face can make a witness more confident in their ability to make an identification, although there are numerous other factors that could inflate (or deflate) a witness’s confidence.

When witnesses are asked whether or not they could identify someone seen earlier, they will rely on various sources of information when making a judgment about the strength of their memory. One source of information that could influence their decision is “availability” or the ease with which information can be brought to mind. A longer exposure is associated with an increase in availability, and this can have interesting consequences for the accuracy of an eyewitness’s identification.

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Лоуренс Аравийский (1962)
# 84 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Ryan Gosling »
# 103 on STARmeter

Ryan romances Kamilah to get close to Lukas. As she tracks the killer, Helen develops an unexpected emotional connection with Ryan. Meanwhile, Gabe uncovers a clue to his wife's mysterious past.

A group of suicide bombers killed dozens and wounded more than 230 people at Istanbul’s main airport on Tuesday night, the latest and most devastating in a series of terrorist attacks in Turkey, a country that has become the new front line in the battle against terrorism.

Shortly before 10 p.m., gunfire and explosions ripped through the terminal of one of the busiest airports in the world, sending hundreds of panicked passengers running. Video captured a flash of explosions in an attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport that killed at least 41 people, according to Turkish officials cited by news reports. While Turkey has experienced a string of recent terrorist attacks — including inside Istanbul, the country’s commercial capital — Tuesday’s shootings and bombing targeted the heart of the country’s civilian infrastructure.

Stunned passengers at the airport described a chaotic scene as they emerged from the terminal roughly an hour after the attack. Witnesses said at least two explosions took place, while others reported seeing and hearing gunfire. At least three attackers were killed, according to the Turkish authorities.

A group of suicide bombers killed dozens and wounded more than 230 people at Istanbul’s main airport on Tuesday night, the latest and most devastating in a series of terrorist attacks in Turkey, a country that has become the new front line in the battle against terrorism.

Shortly before 10 p.m., gunfire and explosions ripped through the terminal of one of the busiest airports in the world, sending hundreds of panicked passengers running. Video captured a flash of explosions in an attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport that killed at least 41 people, according to Turkish officials cited by news reports. While Turkey has experienced a string of recent terrorist attacks — including inside Istanbul, the country’s commercial capital — Tuesday’s shootings and bombing targeted the heart of the country’s civilian infrastructure.

Stunned passengers at the airport described a chaotic scene as they emerged from the terminal roughly an hour after the attack. Witnesses said at least two explosions took place, while others reported seeing and hearing gunfire. At least three attackers were killed, according to the Turkish authorities.

There are two points to bear in mind when examining the relationship between eyewitness memory and exposure duration. First, eyewitnesses are not very good at making estimates of the duration of a given event, and witnesses may overestimate the length of exposure to a face. Second, a longer exposure to a face can make a witness more confident in their ability to make an identification, although there are numerous other factors that could inflate (or deflate) a witness’s confidence.

When witnesses are asked whether or not they could identify someone seen earlier, they will rely on various sources of information when making a judgment about the strength of their memory. One source of information that could influence their decision is “availability” or the ease with which information can be brought to mind. A longer exposure is associated with an increase in availability, and this can have interesting consequences for the accuracy of an eyewitness’s identification.

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Лоуренс Аравийский (1962)
# 84 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Ryan Gosling »
# 103 on STARmeter

Ryan romances Kamilah to get close to Lukas. As she tracks the killer, Helen develops an unexpected emotional connection with Ryan. Meanwhile, Gabe uncovers a clue to his wife's mysterious past.

Explicit memory (used in legal testimony) is affected by post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); individuals diagnosed with PTSD can struggle to recall explicit events from their memory, usually those which are especially traumatic events. This may be due to the individual preferring not to think about the unpleasant memory, which they may rather forget. Implicit memory , on the other hand, does not seem to be affected in the same way that explicit memory does, rather some individuals with PTSD may score higher on implicit memory tests than non-PTSD individuals. [19]

Psychogenic amnesia (or dissociative amnesia) can affect explicit memory for a particular event. [20] Most often cases of psychogenic amnesia occur after witnessing an extremely violent crime or trauma, such as war. [21]

The testimony of a witness can lose validity due to too many external stimuli, that may affect what was witnessed during the crime, and therefore obstruct memory. For example, if an individual witnesses a car accident on a very public street, there may be too many cues distracting the witness from the main focus. Numerous interfering stimulus inputs may suppress the importance of the stimulus of focus, the accident. This can degrade the memory traces of the event, and diminish the representation of those memories. This is known as the cue-overload principle. [27]


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