WEFOUNDServitude and Grandeur of Arms (Penguin Classics)


I saw this big blue monster on my very first day in Yerevan – how lucky can a CCurbivore be? No way to get a decent photo of the dash of course, or time to get that many pics in any case, but at least I bagged me a classic Chaika. It may seem like a Packard with a glandular condition, but there’s much more to it than that. Let’s peel the gauze and gaze at GAZ limos, and look at a few others along the way.

The really big Soviet limousines originally came from the ZIS factory (renamed ZIL after Stalin’s death) in Moscow. Those were the cream of the crop, entirely hand-made – about one or two per month – and featuring 6-litre 8-cyl. engines. But as the regime and its bureaucracy stabilized after 1945, there was a growing need for more luxury cars. So many generals, so many Party bigwigs and diplomats and so few limos, which had already started to look like a clone of the senior ’42 Packards by this point, complete with straight-8s. A few were even used as taxis, with a more utilitarian finish, or as ambulances, but this was clearly not cost-effective.

ZIS/ZIL were busy putting the finishing touches to a completely new car, which would ditch the straight-8 and the pre-war styling in favour of something more enticing. A first attempt was the above “Moskva” car, presented to the Politburo (i.e. the ZIL’s main clientele) in 1956. Dollops of Cadillac and Buick with a zest of Chrysler notwithstanding, this effort was rejected and ZIL went back to the drawing board.

O God, my God!  Lowly and tearful, I raise my suppliant hands to Thee and cover my face in the dust of that Threshold of Thine, exalted above the knowledge of the learned, and the praise of all that glorify Thee.  Graciously look upon Thy servant, humble and lowly at Thy door, with the glances of the eye of Thy mercy, and immerse him in the Ocean of Thine eternal grace.

Lord!  He is a poor and lowly servant of Thine, enthralled and imploring Thee, captive in Thy hand, praying fervently to Thee, trusting in Thee, in tears before Thy face, calling to Thee and beseeching Thee, saying:

O Lord, my God!  Give me Thy grace to serve Thy loved ones, strengthen me in my servitude to Thee, illumine my brow with the light of adoration in Thy court of holiness, and of prayer to Thy kingdom of grandeur.  Help me to be selfless at the heavenly entrance of Thy gate, and aid me to be detached from all things within Thy holy precincts.  Lord!  Give me to drink from the chalice of selflessness; with its robe clothe me, and in its ocean immerse me.  Make me as dust in the pathway of Thy loved ones, and grant that I may offer up my soul for the earth ennobled by the footsteps of Thy chosen ones in Thy path, O Lord of Glory in the Highest.

I saw this big blue monster on my very first day in Yerevan – how lucky can a CCurbivore be? No way to get a decent photo of the dash of course, or time to get that many pics in any case, but at least I bagged me a classic Chaika. It may seem like a Packard with a glandular condition, but there’s much more to it than that. Let’s peel the gauze and gaze at GAZ limos, and look at a few others along the way.

The really big Soviet limousines originally came from the ZIS factory (renamed ZIL after Stalin’s death) in Moscow. Those were the cream of the crop, entirely hand-made – about one or two per month – and featuring 6-litre 8-cyl. engines. But as the regime and its bureaucracy stabilized after 1945, there was a growing need for more luxury cars. So many generals, so many Party bigwigs and diplomats and so few limos, which had already started to look like a clone of the senior ’42 Packards by this point, complete with straight-8s. A few were even used as taxis, with a more utilitarian finish, or as ambulances, but this was clearly not cost-effective.

ZIS/ZIL were busy putting the finishing touches to a completely new car, which would ditch the straight-8 and the pre-war styling in favour of something more enticing. A first attempt was the above “Moskva” car, presented to the Politburo (i.e. the ZIL’s main clientele) in 1956. Dollops of Cadillac and Buick with a zest of Chrysler notwithstanding, this effort was rejected and ZIL went back to the drawing board.

O God, my God!  Lowly and tearful, I raise my suppliant hands to Thee and cover my face in the dust of that Threshold of Thine, exalted above the knowledge of the learned, and the praise of all that glorify Thee.  Graciously look upon Thy servant, humble and lowly at Thy door, with the glances of the eye of Thy mercy, and immerse him in the Ocean of Thine eternal grace.

Lord!  He is a poor and lowly servant of Thine, enthralled and imploring Thee, captive in Thy hand, praying fervently to Thee, trusting in Thee, in tears before Thy face, calling to Thee and beseeching Thee, saying:

O Lord, my God!  Give me Thy grace to serve Thy loved ones, strengthen me in my servitude to Thee, illumine my brow with the light of adoration in Thy court of holiness, and of prayer to Thy kingdom of grandeur.  Help me to be selfless at the heavenly entrance of Thy gate, and aid me to be detached from all things within Thy holy precincts.  Lord!  Give me to drink from the chalice of selflessness; with its robe clothe me, and in its ocean immerse me.  Make me as dust in the pathway of Thy loved ones, and grant that I may offer up my soul for the earth ennobled by the footsteps of Thy chosen ones in Thy path, O Lord of Glory in the Highest.

Like Uganda's Amin - but unlike South Africa's Mandela - Robert Mugabe fully understood that national liberation meant…  Read more »

Alfred-Victor, count de Vigny , (count of ) (born March 27, 1797, Loches , Fr.—died Sept. 17, 1863, Paris), poet, dramatist, and novelist who was the most philosophical of the French Romantic writers.

Vigny adapted the part of Stello dealing with the suicide of Chatterton into a prose drama in three acts, Chatterton (1835). In presenting the last moments of Chatterton’s life, he exalts the nobility and suffering of a misunderstood genius in a pitiless and materialistic society. The triumph of Vigny’s career as a playwright, Chatterton remains one of the best Romantic dramas. It is far superior to La Maréchale d’Ancre (first performed 1831) and expresses Vigny’s melancholy genius more seasonably than does his spiritual comedy Quitte pour la peur (first performed 1833).

Vigny’s consultations enlarged upon his philosophy, formulated theories about the fate of man, and defined the principles that he thought should govern human conduct. To give these ideas the finish they required, he turned again, between 1838 and his death, to poetry, slowly composing the 11 poems that were later collected under the title Les Destinées (1864). The early poems are very pessimistic, but the later ones are increasingly confident affirmations of the imperishable nature of human spiritual powers.

I saw this big blue monster on my very first day in Yerevan – how lucky can a CCurbivore be? No way to get a decent photo of the dash of course, or time to get that many pics in any case, but at least I bagged me a classic Chaika. It may seem like a Packard with a glandular condition, but there’s much more to it than that. Let’s peel the gauze and gaze at GAZ limos, and look at a few others along the way.

The really big Soviet limousines originally came from the ZIS factory (renamed ZIL after Stalin’s death) in Moscow. Those were the cream of the crop, entirely hand-made – about one or two per month – and featuring 6-litre 8-cyl. engines. But as the regime and its bureaucracy stabilized after 1945, there was a growing need for more luxury cars. So many generals, so many Party bigwigs and diplomats and so few limos, which had already started to look like a clone of the senior ’42 Packards by this point, complete with straight-8s. A few were even used as taxis, with a more utilitarian finish, or as ambulances, but this was clearly not cost-effective.

ZIS/ZIL were busy putting the finishing touches to a completely new car, which would ditch the straight-8 and the pre-war styling in favour of something more enticing. A first attempt was the above “Moskva” car, presented to the Politburo (i.e. the ZIL’s main clientele) in 1956. Dollops of Cadillac and Buick with a zest of Chrysler notwithstanding, this effort was rejected and ZIL went back to the drawing board.

I saw this big blue monster on my very first day in Yerevan – how lucky can a CCurbivore be? No way to get a decent photo of the dash of course, or time to get that many pics in any case, but at least I bagged me a classic Chaika. It may seem like a Packard with a glandular condition, but there’s much more to it than that. Let’s peel the gauze and gaze at GAZ limos, and look at a few others along the way.

The really big Soviet limousines originally came from the ZIS factory (renamed ZIL after Stalin’s death) in Moscow. Those were the cream of the crop, entirely hand-made – about one or two per month – and featuring 6-litre 8-cyl. engines. But as the regime and its bureaucracy stabilized after 1945, there was a growing need for more luxury cars. So many generals, so many Party bigwigs and diplomats and so few limos, which had already started to look like a clone of the senior ’42 Packards by this point, complete with straight-8s. A few were even used as taxis, with a more utilitarian finish, or as ambulances, but this was clearly not cost-effective.

ZIS/ZIL were busy putting the finishing touches to a completely new car, which would ditch the straight-8 and the pre-war styling in favour of something more enticing. A first attempt was the above “Moskva” car, presented to the Politburo (i.e. the ZIL’s main clientele) in 1956. Dollops of Cadillac and Buick with a zest of Chrysler notwithstanding, this effort was rejected and ZIL went back to the drawing board.

O God, my God!  Lowly and tearful, I raise my suppliant hands to Thee and cover my face in the dust of that Threshold of Thine, exalted above the knowledge of the learned, and the praise of all that glorify Thee.  Graciously look upon Thy servant, humble and lowly at Thy door, with the glances of the eye of Thy mercy, and immerse him in the Ocean of Thine eternal grace.

Lord!  He is a poor and lowly servant of Thine, enthralled and imploring Thee, captive in Thy hand, praying fervently to Thee, trusting in Thee, in tears before Thy face, calling to Thee and beseeching Thee, saying:

O Lord, my God!  Give me Thy grace to serve Thy loved ones, strengthen me in my servitude to Thee, illumine my brow with the light of adoration in Thy court of holiness, and of prayer to Thy kingdom of grandeur.  Help me to be selfless at the heavenly entrance of Thy gate, and aid me to be detached from all things within Thy holy precincts.  Lord!  Give me to drink from the chalice of selflessness; with its robe clothe me, and in its ocean immerse me.  Make me as dust in the pathway of Thy loved ones, and grant that I may offer up my soul for the earth ennobled by the footsteps of Thy chosen ones in Thy path, O Lord of Glory in the Highest.

Like Uganda's Amin - but unlike South Africa's Mandela - Robert Mugabe fully understood that national liberation meant…  Read more »


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