WEFOUNDSocial Purpose: A Contribution to a Philosophy of Civic Society (Classic Reprint)


In the last ten years, numerous states have passed laws allowing for the creation of a new breed of company: the benefit corporation, an entity that is required to pursue both profits and social good. These laws have taken different forms in different states. In Washington, the legislature passed Chapter 23.B.25 of the RCW and created the Social Purpose Corporation.

A Washington Social Purpose Corporation (SPC) is a corporation formed to pursue profits and social good. The law gives a lot of leeway for determining exactly what social purpose you wish to pursue. Maybe you want to form a company to promote education in schools, or address medical needs in your community, or fund affordable housing, or discover new solutions to environmental issues. All of these (and more) would make excellent pursuits for a Washington Social Purpose Corporation.

RCW 23.B.25.020 requires that all Social Purpose Corporations carry out their purpose “in a manner intended to promote positive short-term or long-term effects of, or minimize adverse short-term or long-term effects of, the corporation’s activities upon any or all of (1) the corporation’s employees, suppliers, or customers; (2) the local, state, national, or world community; or (3) the environment.”

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The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is under the microscope like never before, as consumers are increasingly adept at seeing through insincere attempts by brands to appear to be doing good.

Lord Browne, the former BP CEO and one of the original proponents of CSR, reckons it is now a failed strategy because all too often it is separated from the core function of the business. Instead, brands are beginning to shift their focus onto ‘social purpose’: an effort to contribute to society that is aligned with their core activities.

Game designer Jane McGonigal firmly believes that video games are not just about mashing buttons and getting to the next level. In fact, during her talk at TEDGlobal 2012 , McGonigal gave several surprising statistics : that online gaming can be more effective than pharmaceuticals in treating clinical depression and that just 30 minutes a day is correlated with significant increases in happiness.

McGonigal says online games can even help people heal from injuries and achieve greater wellness in the face of disease. She used an interesting test subject to illustrate this point: herself.

In her talk , McGonigal shared that, following a severe concussion, she found herself bed ridden for three months with a voice in her head telling her that the pain would never end. As she explains, “I thought, ‘I am either going to kill myself, or I’m going to turn this into a game.’”

In the last ten years, numerous states have passed laws allowing for the creation of a new breed of company: the benefit corporation, an entity that is required to pursue both profits and social good. These laws have taken different forms in different states. In Washington, the legislature passed Chapter 23.B.25 of the RCW and created the Social Purpose Corporation.

A Washington Social Purpose Corporation (SPC) is a corporation formed to pursue profits and social good. The law gives a lot of leeway for determining exactly what social purpose you wish to pursue. Maybe you want to form a company to promote education in schools, or address medical needs in your community, or fund affordable housing, or discover new solutions to environmental issues. All of these (and more) would make excellent pursuits for a Washington Social Purpose Corporation.

RCW 23.B.25.020 requires that all Social Purpose Corporations carry out their purpose “in a manner intended to promote positive short-term or long-term effects of, or minimize adverse short-term or long-term effects of, the corporation’s activities upon any or all of (1) the corporation’s employees, suppliers, or customers; (2) the local, state, national, or world community; or (3) the environment.”

Our website uses  cookies  to improve your user experience. If you continue browsing, we assume that you consent to our use of  cookies . More information can be found in our  Privacy &  Cookies  Policy .

The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is under the microscope like never before, as consumers are increasingly adept at seeing through insincere attempts by brands to appear to be doing good.

Lord Browne, the former BP CEO and one of the original proponents of CSR, reckons it is now a failed strategy because all too often it is separated from the core function of the business. Instead, brands are beginning to shift their focus onto ‘social purpose’: an effort to contribute to society that is aligned with their core activities.

Game designer Jane McGonigal firmly believes that video games are not just about mashing buttons and getting to the next level. In fact, during her talk at TEDGlobal 2012 , McGonigal gave several surprising statistics : that online gaming can be more effective than pharmaceuticals in treating clinical depression and that just 30 minutes a day is correlated with significant increases in happiness.

McGonigal says online games can even help people heal from injuries and achieve greater wellness in the face of disease. She used an interesting test subject to illustrate this point: herself.

In her talk , McGonigal shared that, following a severe concussion, she found herself bed ridden for three months with a voice in her head telling her that the pain would never end. As she explains, “I thought, ‘I am either going to kill myself, or I’m going to turn this into a game.’”

At College Pro we unfold the gift of service every day. We deliver this to our customers, partners and each other. Our commitment to service excellence defines who we are. Outside of our work, the genuine service ethic of our people at College Pro is reflected through their contributions to social good in ways they choose. As a company, our support and recognition of these efforts highlight the dedication and humanity of our people, inspiring us all to enrich the fabric of community.

The FirstService Relief Fund was created to help employees, franchises and employees of franchises who are facing financial hardship immediately after a natural disaster or an unforeseen personal hardship. The FirstService Relief Fund relies primarily on individual donations from employees, franchises and employees of franchises along with support from FirstService Corporation. All administrative costs of maintaining the fund will be paid for by FirstService Corporation and 100% of individual donations will be directed to those who qualify for a grant.

Every contribution helps and we encourage you to contact your local human resource/payroll professional for guidance on how to set up an automatic payroll deduction.

In the last ten years, numerous states have passed laws allowing for the creation of a new breed of company: the benefit corporation, an entity that is required to pursue both profits and social good. These laws have taken different forms in different states. In Washington, the legislature passed Chapter 23.B.25 of the RCW and created the Social Purpose Corporation.

A Washington Social Purpose Corporation (SPC) is a corporation formed to pursue profits and social good. The law gives a lot of leeway for determining exactly what social purpose you wish to pursue. Maybe you want to form a company to promote education in schools, or address medical needs in your community, or fund affordable housing, or discover new solutions to environmental issues. All of these (and more) would make excellent pursuits for a Washington Social Purpose Corporation.

RCW 23.B.25.020 requires that all Social Purpose Corporations carry out their purpose “in a manner intended to promote positive short-term or long-term effects of, or minimize adverse short-term or long-term effects of, the corporation’s activities upon any or all of (1) the corporation’s employees, suppliers, or customers; (2) the local, state, national, or world community; or (3) the environment.”

In the last ten years, numerous states have passed laws allowing for the creation of a new breed of company: the benefit corporation, an entity that is required to pursue both profits and social good. These laws have taken different forms in different states. In Washington, the legislature passed Chapter 23.B.25 of the RCW and created the Social Purpose Corporation.

A Washington Social Purpose Corporation (SPC) is a corporation formed to pursue profits and social good. The law gives a lot of leeway for determining exactly what social purpose you wish to pursue. Maybe you want to form a company to promote education in schools, or address medical needs in your community, or fund affordable housing, or discover new solutions to environmental issues. All of these (and more) would make excellent pursuits for a Washington Social Purpose Corporation.

RCW 23.B.25.020 requires that all Social Purpose Corporations carry out their purpose “in a manner intended to promote positive short-term or long-term effects of, or minimize adverse short-term or long-term effects of, the corporation’s activities upon any or all of (1) the corporation’s employees, suppliers, or customers; (2) the local, state, national, or world community; or (3) the environment.”

Our website uses  cookies  to improve your user experience. If you continue browsing, we assume that you consent to our use of  cookies . More information can be found in our  Privacy &  Cookies  Policy .

The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is under the microscope like never before, as consumers are increasingly adept at seeing through insincere attempts by brands to appear to be doing good.

Lord Browne, the former BP CEO and one of the original proponents of CSR, reckons it is now a failed strategy because all too often it is separated from the core function of the business. Instead, brands are beginning to shift their focus onto ‘social purpose’: an effort to contribute to society that is aligned with their core activities.


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