WEFOUNDCrying in Colour: A Nonsense Novella


I do want to take a moment and acknowledge that men are confronted with a great amount of stigma when it comes to mental health. Historically (and sadly, even presently) women have been portrayed as weak, hysterical, emotional. And so we’re the ones who take on this burden of emotional labour; it is our terrain. Men have been portrayed as strong, self-sufficient, rational. To admit that you’re struggling, that you’re dealing with a mental illness, might seem impossible. It is tragic when a man suffers but it is quotidian when a woman does.

In a recent article for GUTS Magazine, “ DEAR BB: DUDES INRAPE CULTURE ,”the author addresses a man who wants to know how he can stop being complicit in rape culture. He writes: “Can you talk to me about talking to rapists about rape?” The unnamed author responds by asking the man to think about the emotional labour he is asking the women in his life to perform. She writes: “Teaching people not to rape (and indeed, trying to not get raped) is work that is disproportionately performed by the people who are raped most often: women, even more so if they are of colour, Indigenous, trans, sex workers, disabled, fat, or poor. Rape is quotidian to us.”

Starlee Kine is an American radio and podcast producer. At the GSA Library we are all big fans of her emotive and captivating solo production Mystery Show –  a show which aims to answer the little mysteries in life that a simple online search will not solve, such as ‘Where did that old video store disappear to? ‘ and ‘How tall really is Jake Gyllenhaal?’ .

When not producing and presenting podcasts, Kine is also an artist. We currently hold a copy of her artist’s book  Crying Instructions . The work, which is comprised of a laser etched poem on a chopping board, and a printed magazine, explores the emotions of the artist.

The production is part of a project called THE THING Quarterly.  THE THING is an artist-run publication in the form of objects.  It’s like a magazine, except that each issue is conceived of by a different contributor and published as a useful object. THE THING works with artists, writers, filmmakers, designers, and musicians to create issues and projects that ask us to rethink our relationship to objects.

I do want to take a moment and acknowledge that men are confronted with a great amount of stigma when it comes to mental health. Historically (and sadly, even presently) women have been portrayed as weak, hysterical, emotional. And so we’re the ones who take on this burden of emotional labour; it is our terrain. Men have been portrayed as strong, self-sufficient, rational. To admit that you’re struggling, that you’re dealing with a mental illness, might seem impossible. It is tragic when a man suffers but it is quotidian when a woman does.

In a recent article for GUTS Magazine, “ DEAR BB: DUDES INRAPE CULTURE ,”the author addresses a man who wants to know how he can stop being complicit in rape culture. He writes: “Can you talk to me about talking to rapists about rape?” The unnamed author responds by asking the man to think about the emotional labour he is asking the women in his life to perform. She writes: “Teaching people not to rape (and indeed, trying to not get raped) is work that is disproportionately performed by the people who are raped most often: women, even more so if they are of colour, Indigenous, trans, sex workers, disabled, fat, or poor. Rape is quotidian to us.”

I do want to take a moment and acknowledge that men are confronted with a great amount of stigma when it comes to mental health. Historically (and sadly, even presently) women have been portrayed as weak, hysterical, emotional. And so we’re the ones who take on this burden of emotional labour; it is our terrain. Men have been portrayed as strong, self-sufficient, rational. To admit that you’re struggling, that you’re dealing with a mental illness, might seem impossible. It is tragic when a man suffers but it is quotidian when a woman does.

In a recent article for GUTS Magazine, “ DEAR BB: DUDES INRAPE CULTURE ,”the author addresses a man who wants to know how he can stop being complicit in rape culture. He writes: “Can you talk to me about talking to rapists about rape?” The unnamed author responds by asking the man to think about the emotional labour he is asking the women in his life to perform. She writes: “Teaching people not to rape (and indeed, trying to not get raped) is work that is disproportionately performed by the people who are raped most often: women, even more so if they are of colour, Indigenous, trans, sex workers, disabled, fat, or poor. Rape is quotidian to us.”

Starlee Kine is an American radio and podcast producer. At the GSA Library we are all big fans of her emotive and captivating solo production Mystery Show –  a show which aims to answer the little mysteries in life that a simple online search will not solve, such as ‘Where did that old video store disappear to? ‘ and ‘How tall really is Jake Gyllenhaal?’ .

When not producing and presenting podcasts, Kine is also an artist. We currently hold a copy of her artist’s book  Crying Instructions . The work, which is comprised of a laser etched poem on a chopping board, and a printed magazine, explores the emotions of the artist.

The production is part of a project called THE THING Quarterly.  THE THING is an artist-run publication in the form of objects.  It’s like a magazine, except that each issue is conceived of by a different contributor and published as a useful object. THE THING works with artists, writers, filmmakers, designers, and musicians to create issues and projects that ask us to rethink our relationship to objects.

He calls it the '5 S's', which involves swaddling the baby in a blanket, putting them in a side-on position, making shushing sounds, swinging them and giving them a pacifier to suck.

What is more his theory has been successfully tested in a medical trial and found to be extremely effective at soothing babies after receiving essential jabs.

Dr John Harrington was inspired after seeing a lecture on the subject given by Dr Karp. He decided to test it at the Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters in Virginia where he worked.


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