WEFOUNDThe Fragile World


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Security forces stand at the SYL hotel that was partly destroyed following a car bombing in Mogadishu, Somalia. Feisal Omar/Reuters Humanity as a whole may be enjoying the healthiest, most peaceful period it's ever seen, but that doesn't mean every city is in great shape.

According to Robert Muggah, global security expert and research director at the think tank Igarapé Institute , there are a total of 66 cities dealing with such rapid urbanization, high unemployment, and risk of natural disaster and violence that they're highly vulnerable to physical or economic collapse.

"All cities are fragile to some degree," he tells Business Insider. But what separates a city like New York from one like Mogadishu, Somalia is generally the extent to which local government delivers basic services to its citizens. Fragile cities don't offer equality, safety, affordable access to health care, or adequate resources during environmental disaster.

Fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV) is a critical development challenge that threatens efforts to end extreme poverty, affecting both low- and middle-income countries. The share of the extreme poor living in conflict-affected situations is expected to rise to more than 60% by 2030. Conflicts also drive 80% of all humanitarian needs, while they reduce gross domestic product (GDP) growth by two percentage points per year, on average.

Forced displacement is a developing world crisis, which must be addressed with collective action. There were 65 million refugees and internally displaced as of end-2015, with 95% living in developing countries and over half displaced for more than four years. At its root are the same 10 conflicts which have accounted for the majority of the forcibly displaced every year since 1991, consistently hosted by about 15 countries – also overwhelmingly in the developing world.

As an institution born in the aftermath of World War II, reconstruction and development to foster stability is part of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) core expertise. Responding to an increasingly complex fragility landscape, the Bank is taking a broader approach to FCV that aims to address sources of instability and build resilience. The new approach emphasizes prevention and acting early. Gender is an important focus of prevention, and empowering women economically helps build peace. The Bank will also remain engaged during active conflict, and through countries in recovery and transition. Stronger collaboration with humanitarian-development-peace partners is critical to success.

The Wowhead Client is a little application we use to keep our database up to date, and to provide you with some nifty extra functionality on the website!  

Security forces stand at the SYL hotel that was partly destroyed following a car bombing in Mogadishu, Somalia. Feisal Omar/Reuters Humanity as a whole may be enjoying the healthiest, most peaceful period it's ever seen, but that doesn't mean every city is in great shape.

According to Robert Muggah, global security expert and research director at the think tank Igarapé Institute , there are a total of 66 cities dealing with such rapid urbanization, high unemployment, and risk of natural disaster and violence that they're highly vulnerable to physical or economic collapse.

"All cities are fragile to some degree," he tells Business Insider. But what separates a city like New York from one like Mogadishu, Somalia is generally the extent to which local government delivers basic services to its citizens. Fragile cities don't offer equality, safety, affordable access to health care, or adequate resources during environmental disaster.

Fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV) is a critical development challenge that threatens efforts to end extreme poverty, affecting both low- and middle-income countries. The share of the extreme poor living in conflict-affected situations is expected to rise to more than 60% by 2030. Conflicts also drive 80% of all humanitarian needs, while they reduce gross domestic product (GDP) growth by two percentage points per year, on average.

Forced displacement is a developing world crisis, which must be addressed with collective action. There were 65 million refugees and internally displaced as of end-2015, with 95% living in developing countries and over half displaced for more than four years. At its root are the same 10 conflicts which have accounted for the majority of the forcibly displaced every year since 1991, consistently hosted by about 15 countries – also overwhelmingly in the developing world.

As an institution born in the aftermath of World War II, reconstruction and development to foster stability is part of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) core expertise. Responding to an increasingly complex fragility landscape, the Bank is taking a broader approach to FCV that aims to address sources of instability and build resilience. The new approach emphasizes prevention and acting early. Gender is an important focus of prevention, and empowering women economically helps build peace. The Bank will also remain engaged during active conflict, and through countries in recovery and transition. Stronger collaboration with humanitarian-development-peace partners is critical to success.

The World Bank Group’s (WBG) Fragile, Conflict and Violence Group (formally the Center on Conflict, Security and Development CCSD) annually releases the Harmonized List of Fragile Situations.

The first such list was compiled in fiscal year 2006 and has gone through a series of changes in terms of classification from the Low Income Countries Under Stress List (LICUS) (2006-2009), to the Fragile States List (2010) to the now Harmonized list of Fragile Situations (2011-2015). The concept and the list have evolved as the WBG’s understanding of the development challenges in countries affected by violence and instability has matured.

This information note provides a brief historical overview of the progression of the list to date, as well as some comments on current limitations of the FCS list, and future directions. 

The Wowhead Client is a little application we use to keep our database up to date, and to provide you with some nifty extra functionality on the website!  

Security forces stand at the SYL hotel that was partly destroyed following a car bombing in Mogadishu, Somalia. Feisal Omar/Reuters Humanity as a whole may be enjoying the healthiest, most peaceful period it's ever seen, but that doesn't mean every city is in great shape.

According to Robert Muggah, global security expert and research director at the think tank Igarapé Institute , there are a total of 66 cities dealing with such rapid urbanization, high unemployment, and risk of natural disaster and violence that they're highly vulnerable to physical or economic collapse.

"All cities are fragile to some degree," he tells Business Insider. But what separates a city like New York from one like Mogadishu, Somalia is generally the extent to which local government delivers basic services to its citizens. Fragile cities don't offer equality, safety, affordable access to health care, or adequate resources during environmental disaster.

Fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV) is a critical development challenge that threatens efforts to end extreme poverty, affecting both low- and middle-income countries. The share of the extreme poor living in conflict-affected situations is expected to rise to more than 60% by 2030. Conflicts also drive 80% of all humanitarian needs, while they reduce gross domestic product (GDP) growth by two percentage points per year, on average.

Forced displacement is a developing world crisis, which must be addressed with collective action. There were 65 million refugees and internally displaced as of end-2015, with 95% living in developing countries and over half displaced for more than four years. At its root are the same 10 conflicts which have accounted for the majority of the forcibly displaced every year since 1991, consistently hosted by about 15 countries – also overwhelmingly in the developing world.

As an institution born in the aftermath of World War II, reconstruction and development to foster stability is part of the World Bank Group’s (WBG) core expertise. Responding to an increasingly complex fragility landscape, the Bank is taking a broader approach to FCV that aims to address sources of instability and build resilience. The new approach emphasizes prevention and acting early. Gender is an important focus of prevention, and empowering women economically helps build peace. The Bank will also remain engaged during active conflict, and through countries in recovery and transition. Stronger collaboration with humanitarian-development-peace partners is critical to success.

The World Bank Group’s (WBG) Fragile, Conflict and Violence Group (formally the Center on Conflict, Security and Development CCSD) annually releases the Harmonized List of Fragile Situations.

The first such list was compiled in fiscal year 2006 and has gone through a series of changes in terms of classification from the Low Income Countries Under Stress List (LICUS) (2006-2009), to the Fragile States List (2010) to the now Harmonized list of Fragile Situations (2011-2015). The concept and the list have evolved as the WBG’s understanding of the development challenges in countries affected by violence and instability has matured.

This information note provides a brief historical overview of the progression of the list to date, as well as some comments on current limitations of the FCS list, and future directions. 

What does it mean to be poor ? How is poverty measured? Third World countries are often described as developing while the First World, industrialized nations are often developed . What does it mean to describe a nation as developing ? A lack of material wealth does not necessarily mean that one is deprived. A strong economy in a developed nation doesn’t mean much when a significant percentage (even a majority) of the population is struggling to survive.

Human development is about much more than the rise or fall of national incomes. It is about creating an environment in which people can develop their full potential and lead productive, creative lives in accord with their needs and interests. People are the real wealth of nations. Development is thus about expanding the choices people have to lead lives that they value. And it is thus about much more than economic growth, which is only a means—if a very important one—of enlarging people’s choices.

At household, community, societal, national and international levels, various aspects of the above need to be provided, as well as commitment to various democratic institutions that do not become corrupted by special interests and agendas.

The Wowhead Client is a little application we use to keep our database up to date, and to provide you with some nifty extra functionality on the website!  

Security forces stand at the SYL hotel that was partly destroyed following a car bombing in Mogadishu, Somalia. Feisal Omar/Reuters Humanity as a whole may be enjoying the healthiest, most peaceful period it's ever seen, but that doesn't mean every city is in great shape.

According to Robert Muggah, global security expert and research director at the think tank Igarapé Institute , there are a total of 66 cities dealing with such rapid urbanization, high unemployment, and risk of natural disaster and violence that they're highly vulnerable to physical or economic collapse.

"All cities are fragile to some degree," he tells Business Insider. But what separates a city like New York from one like Mogadishu, Somalia is generally the extent to which local government delivers basic services to its citizens. Fragile cities don't offer equality, safety, affordable access to health care, or adequate resources during environmental disaster.

The Wowhead Client is a little application we use to keep our database up to date, and to provide you with some nifty extra functionality on the website!  


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