WEFOUNDWelcome to Mamoko


Once upon a time, fresh out of college and a little wide-eyed, I had a boyfriend who had grown up on Richard Scarry. That boyfriend’s world overflowed with Anglophiles and intellectuals and Scarry —in a twist of misdirected intimidation — acquired a certain aura of kid-lit-mystique for me. (I assumed that these unknown classics were English, too, which of course made them that much more fabulous.)

In fact, Scarry (1919-1994) was a prolific American author-illustrator, and his books are nothing if not accessible. His full and detailed illustrations in the Busytown books and others offer up a simple sort of engagement that young children adore: innumerable details and visual story fragments that let kids look and search and spy and name — and where they can’t name, ask. Kids spend their days doing the same thing out in the real world, noticing and engaging in visual play with whatever grabs their attention. But books like Scarry’s add the dimension of a beloved adult’s lap.

Scarry’s picture books are essentially beginner-wimmelbilderbuch or wimmelbooks. German author-illustrator  Hans Jurgen Press   (1926-2002) coined the term in the mid 20th century and it translates loosely as “teeming picture book”; the format clearly owes a debt to the 15th and 16th century paintings of  Hieronymus Bosch  and  Pieter Brueghel the Elder . But Press’s books incorporated the element of the hunt, making the visual meander more goal-oriented: instead of the eye simply wandering as it would in staring out the side of a stroller or a car window (or at a Bosch painting), it has something to  find  in these books’ considered and dense illustrations.

Welcome to Mamoko [Aleksandra Mizielinska, Daniel Mizielinski] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Welcome to the world of Mamoko …

Our books Welcome to Mamoko by Aleksandra Mizielińska and Daniel Mizieliński. You become the storyteller with this wonderful wordless book. Spot each character from ...

01.09.2013  · Welcome to Mamoko has 204 ratings and 47 reviews. Weronika said: So I've just remembered about this little book. I've read it with my younger siblings an...

Once upon a time, fresh out of college and a little wide-eyed, I had a boyfriend who had grown up on Richard Scarry. That boyfriend’s world overflowed with Anglophiles and intellectuals and Scarry —in a twist of misdirected intimidation — acquired a certain aura of kid-lit-mystique for me. (I assumed that these unknown classics were English, too, which of course made them that much more fabulous.)

In fact, Scarry (1919-1994) was a prolific American author-illustrator, and his books are nothing if not accessible. His full and detailed illustrations in the Busytown books and others offer up a simple sort of engagement that young children adore: innumerable details and visual story fragments that let kids look and search and spy and name — and where they can’t name, ask. Kids spend their days doing the same thing out in the real world, noticing and engaging in visual play with whatever grabs their attention. But books like Scarry’s add the dimension of a beloved adult’s lap.

Scarry’s picture books are essentially beginner-wimmelbilderbuch or wimmelbooks. German author-illustrator  Hans Jurgen Press   (1926-2002) coined the term in the mid 20th century and it translates loosely as “teeming picture book”; the format clearly owes a debt to the 15th and 16th century paintings of  Hieronymus Bosch  and  Pieter Brueghel the Elder . But Press’s books incorporated the element of the hunt, making the visual meander more goal-oriented: instead of the eye simply wandering as it would in staring out the side of a stroller or a car window (or at a Bosch painting), it has something to  find  in these books’ considered and dense illustrations.


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