WEFOUNDGood Neighbors


In 2015, World Vision's Teacher Recourse Centers distributed more than $7 million in new school supplies to 351,935 U.S. children and youth, and 10,742 teachers.

Each year, more than 10,000 teachers visit Teacher Resource Centers in under-resourced communities, where they are able to stock up on school supplies provided by generous corporate donors. Learn more about how we help ensure students have the tools they need to be successful in pursuit of their education .

World Vision and our partners continue to positively impact the lives of children and families in the U.S. Be inspired by these stories—and then submit a story of your own.


Preserving the quality of life in Montgomery County neighborhoods needs help from all of us. New County laws initiated by the County Executive and approved by the County Council are designed to help protect our residential neighborhoods. These laws go into effect April 24, 2011. In general, what follows is what you need to know. For exact details see the   legislation  or call 311.

There are three types of home-based businesses allowed:no-impact(which don't need to register with the county), registered(which need a permit from the Department of Permitting Services), and medical practitioners(must also register.) The person who performs the occupation must live in the house. On-site employees are limited to one in a 24-hour period. The number of visits to a no-impact business is limited to five customers/clientsa week. A registered business is allowed no more than five customers/clients a day or 20 a week.

The on-site parking for home occupations is limited to two spaces. Lawn maintenance companies operating as home occupations are allowed only one single-axle trailer or truck at a time.

In 2015, World Vision's Teacher Recourse Centers distributed more than $7 million in new school supplies to 351,935 U.S. children and youth, and 10,742 teachers.

Each year, more than 10,000 teachers visit Teacher Resource Centers in under-resourced communities, where they are able to stock up on school supplies provided by generous corporate donors. Learn more about how we help ensure students have the tools they need to be successful in pursuit of their education .

World Vision and our partners continue to positively impact the lives of children and families in the U.S. Be inspired by these stories—and then submit a story of your own.

In 2015, World Vision's Teacher Recourse Centers distributed more than $7 million in new school supplies to 351,935 U.S. children and youth, and 10,742 teachers.

Each year, more than 10,000 teachers visit Teacher Resource Centers in under-resourced communities, where they are able to stock up on school supplies provided by generous corporate donors. Learn more about how we help ensure students have the tools they need to be successful in pursuit of their education .

World Vision and our partners continue to positively impact the lives of children and families in the U.S. Be inspired by these stories—and then submit a story of your own.


Preserving the quality of life in Montgomery County neighborhoods needs help from all of us. New County laws initiated by the County Executive and approved by the County Council are designed to help protect our residential neighborhoods. These laws go into effect April 24, 2011. In general, what follows is what you need to know. For exact details see the   legislation  or call 311.

There are three types of home-based businesses allowed:no-impact(which don't need to register with the county), registered(which need a permit from the Department of Permitting Services), and medical practitioners(must also register.) The person who performs the occupation must live in the house. On-site employees are limited to one in a 24-hour period. The number of visits to a no-impact business is limited to five customers/clientsa week. A registered business is allowed no more than five customers/clients a day or 20 a week.

The on-site parking for home occupations is limited to two spaces. Lawn maintenance companies operating as home occupations are allowed only one single-axle trailer or truck at a time.

We live in a world of deep inequality, and the gap between the rich and the poor is widening. We in the rich world generally agree that this is a problem we ought to help fix—but that the real beneficiaries will be the billions of people living in poverty. After all, inequality has little impact on the lives of those who find themselves on top of the pile. Right?

For decades, Wilkinson has studied why some societies are healthier than others. He found that what the healthiest societies have in common is not that they have more—more income, more education, or more wealth—but that what they have is more equitably shared.

In fact, it turns out that not only disease, but a whole host of social problems ranging from mental illness to drug use are worse in unequal societies. In his latest book, The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better , co-written with Kate Pickett, Wilkinson details the pernicious effects that inequality has on societies: eroding trust, increasing anxiety and illness, encouraging excessive consumption.


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