WEFOUNDThe used lemon owner's manual: A publication of the New York State Consumer Protection Board


Are you beginning to think that used car you bought might be a lemon? If you the used car or truck you just purchased has defects that cannot be repaired, you may get relief under New Jersey's Used Car Lemon Law. To learn more about New Jersey's Used Car Lemon Law and what your rights as a consumer are, read on to learn more.

You've purchased a new car, but something isn't right. Whether it's the steering, the brakes, a botched paint job, or a horrible smell, you think you've bought a lemon. But just because you personally believe the car to be a lemon doesn't mean the law necessarily agrees with you. Each state has enacted its own set of "lemon laws" to deal with the problem of irretrievably malfunctioning new cars. Some states also protect the purchase of used cars - see below., The following is a general framework for determining whether your car qualifies as a "lemon," and therefore whether you are afforded protection under consumer protection laws.

While you can handle the problem yourself using the guidelines below, if you find the process too difficult or the manufacturer is acting inappropriately, you can contact an attorney with experience dealing with lemons and manufacturers, who will fight for your rights.

Under the law of most states, for a vehicle to be considered a lemon, the car must 1) have a "substantial defect," covered by warranty, that occurs within a certain time after purchase, and 2) continue to have the defect after a "reasonable number" of repair attempts. What exactly constitutes a substantial defect or a reasonable number of attempts varies by state, so it is incumbent upon you to determine the law in your state .

We are seeing a lot of 2008 Jeep Wrangler and Patriot vehicles with water leaks.  Regardless of whether you have a hard top or a soft top, this should not be happening, no matter what your service manager says.  If your Jeep has been leaking, and you have been in three or more times to get the matter repaired, contact us immediately. Under your State’s   lemon law  and/or State Federal Laws, you could be entitled to a new car or refund and help is free!

I just discovered my Jeep 2008 Jeep Patriot has a huge water leak through the roof after a night on rain September 21st, 2008 . I first discovered the leak from water dripping from the map lights on the morning of September 22nd. I pulled out of my parking space and heard a hug swooshing sound in the roof, then huge swishing around in in the DASH BOARD. Then I turned on the heat, and water STARTED SPATTERING OUT OF THE VENTS!! The carpet is soaked. I worry even if they can “FIX” the problem, I will have mold / and or rust. I am quite upset seeing that I saved years ($20,000 cash) for my first new car. Heading to the dealer on Wednesday.

My 2007 jeep wrangler has leaked consistently since I purchased it brand new from Charles Hurst Group. They flew a specialist over from the states who failed to fix it what are my rights as they are offering me an 08 wrangler with 3000 miles up on it can I not be refunded as this is my second wrangler in 5 years

Are you beginning to think that used car you bought might be a lemon? If you the used car or truck you just purchased has defects that cannot be repaired, you may get relief under New Jersey's Used Car Lemon Law. To learn more about New Jersey's Used Car Lemon Law and what your rights as a consumer are, read on to learn more.

Are you beginning to think that used car you bought might be a lemon? If you the used car or truck you just purchased has defects that cannot be repaired, you may get relief under New Jersey's Used Car Lemon Law. To learn more about New Jersey's Used Car Lemon Law and what your rights as a consumer are, read on to learn more.

You've purchased a new car, but something isn't right. Whether it's the steering, the brakes, a botched paint job, or a horrible smell, you think you've bought a lemon. But just because you personally believe the car to be a lemon doesn't mean the law necessarily agrees with you. Each state has enacted its own set of "lemon laws" to deal with the problem of irretrievably malfunctioning new cars. Some states also protect the purchase of used cars - see below., The following is a general framework for determining whether your car qualifies as a "lemon," and therefore whether you are afforded protection under consumer protection laws.

While you can handle the problem yourself using the guidelines below, if you find the process too difficult or the manufacturer is acting inappropriately, you can contact an attorney with experience dealing with lemons and manufacturers, who will fight for your rights.

Under the law of most states, for a vehicle to be considered a lemon, the car must 1) have a "substantial defect," covered by warranty, that occurs within a certain time after purchase, and 2) continue to have the defect after a "reasonable number" of repair attempts. What exactly constitutes a substantial defect or a reasonable number of attempts varies by state, so it is incumbent upon you to determine the law in your state .


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