WEFOUNDSnow Crash


Enlarge Image Comics Finally, we have some good news for the end of the week. According to Variety , Amazon is going on a bit of a sci-fi binge. The streaming network, which has already given us delights like The Man in the High Castle and an excellent new version of The Tick, has commissioned three new series: the Larry Niven classic Ringworld, Neal Stephenson's cyberpunk Snow Crash, and (the one that brightened my day most)  Lazarus  by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark.

Assuming all three remain true to their source material, each will be a very different vision of the future. Ringworld takes place nearly a thousand years from now in a post-scarcity culture. Written in 1970 and the first of a long-running series of books, the titular Ringworld is a vast habitat in space.

In Ringworld, our hero is a bored 200-year old hired by some aliens to investigate this artificial world—a 600 million-mile (950 million km) ribbon orbiting a Sun-like star. It's been awhile since I've read the book but it's easy to see how previous attempts to adapt it for the screen have ended in failure. But with an Amazonian budget and and ever-more capable CGI, now might be the perfect time to try.

Enlarge Image Comics Finally, we have some good news for the end of the week. According to Variety , Amazon is going on a bit of a sci-fi binge. The streaming network, which has already given us delights like The Man in the High Castle and an excellent new version of The Tick, has commissioned three new series: the Larry Niven classic Ringworld, Neal Stephenson's cyberpunk Snow Crash, and (the one that brightened my day most)  Lazarus  by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark.

Assuming all three remain true to their source material, each will be a very different vision of the future. Ringworld takes place nearly a thousand years from now in a post-scarcity culture. Written in 1970 and the first of a long-running series of books, the titular Ringworld is a vast habitat in space.

In Ringworld, our hero is a bored 200-year old hired by some aliens to investigate this artificial world—a 600 million-mile (950 million km) ribbon orbiting a Sun-like star. It's been awhile since I've read the book but it's easy to see how previous attempts to adapt it for the screen have ended in failure. But with an Amazonian budget and and ever-more capable CGI, now might be the perfect time to try.

Imagine that you are making a smoothie—an idea smoothie, to be exact. Oh, and you're going to need the biggest brain blender you can conjure, because we're going to be cramming a whole lot of ideas into this one.

First pour in some hackers and skateboard punks; next, a few dashes of detective work and World War II history. Sprinkle in some Sumerian mythology, Catholicism and other flavors of Christianity, and a bit Aleut culture, then toss in a couple of motorcycles, guns, and tech trinkets. Jostle the ingredients to make room for a few more: virtual reality, global conspiracies, memetics, linguistics, and dystopia.

Welcome to Snow Crash , which takes the above-mentioned ideas (along with many more), whirls them all together, and produces a fast-pasted, irreverent romp through a future that's just around the corner. And we do mean just around the corner—because while some of the inventions seem a tad far-fetched (cybernetic guard dogs, really?), it's hard not to see parallels to our own world in the corporate world, security-patrolled suburban enclaves, and uneven distribution of wealth that fill this book.

This site works best with JavaScript enabled. Please enable JavaScript to get the best experience from this site.

Slick roads are believed to have been a factor in a crash that claimed two lives near the Moore County community of Seven Lakes on Wednesday night.

A pickup truck slid off a bridge and ran through a guardrail on Dowd Road near Mt. Carmel/Beulah Hill Church Road, and came to rest upside down in a creek shortly before 10 p.m., according to the Aberdeen Times .

Chatham County residents Michael Wilson, 57, and Jerry Wilson, 73, were pronounced dead at the scene, according to the report.

Enlarge Image Comics Finally, we have some good news for the end of the week. According to Variety , Amazon is going on a bit of a sci-fi binge. The streaming network, which has already given us delights like The Man in the High Castle and an excellent new version of The Tick, has commissioned three new series: the Larry Niven classic Ringworld, Neal Stephenson's cyberpunk Snow Crash, and (the one that brightened my day most)  Lazarus  by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark.

Assuming all three remain true to their source material, each will be a very different vision of the future. Ringworld takes place nearly a thousand years from now in a post-scarcity culture. Written in 1970 and the first of a long-running series of books, the titular Ringworld is a vast habitat in space.

In Ringworld, our hero is a bored 200-year old hired by some aliens to investigate this artificial world—a 600 million-mile (950 million km) ribbon orbiting a Sun-like star. It's been awhile since I've read the book but it's easy to see how previous attempts to adapt it for the screen have ended in failure. But with an Amazonian budget and and ever-more capable CGI, now might be the perfect time to try.

Imagine that you are making a smoothie—an idea smoothie, to be exact. Oh, and you're going to need the biggest brain blender you can conjure, because we're going to be cramming a whole lot of ideas into this one.

First pour in some hackers and skateboard punks; next, a few dashes of detective work and World War II history. Sprinkle in some Sumerian mythology, Catholicism and other flavors of Christianity, and a bit Aleut culture, then toss in a couple of motorcycles, guns, and tech trinkets. Jostle the ingredients to make room for a few more: virtual reality, global conspiracies, memetics, linguistics, and dystopia.

Welcome to Snow Crash , which takes the above-mentioned ideas (along with many more), whirls them all together, and produces a fast-pasted, irreverent romp through a future that's just around the corner. And we do mean just around the corner—because while some of the inventions seem a tad far-fetched (cybernetic guard dogs, really?), it's hard not to see parallels to our own world in the corporate world, security-patrolled suburban enclaves, and uneven distribution of wealth that fill this book.

This site works best with JavaScript enabled. Please enable JavaScript to get the best experience from this site.

Enlarge Image Comics Finally, we have some good news for the end of the week. According to Variety , Amazon is going on a bit of a sci-fi binge. The streaming network, which has already given us delights like The Man in the High Castle and an excellent new version of The Tick, has commissioned three new series: the Larry Niven classic Ringworld, Neal Stephenson's cyberpunk Snow Crash, and (the one that brightened my day most)  Lazarus  by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark.

Assuming all three remain true to their source material, each will be a very different vision of the future. Ringworld takes place nearly a thousand years from now in a post-scarcity culture. Written in 1970 and the first of a long-running series of books, the titular Ringworld is a vast habitat in space.

In Ringworld, our hero is a bored 200-year old hired by some aliens to investigate this artificial world—a 600 million-mile (950 million km) ribbon orbiting a Sun-like star. It's been awhile since I've read the book but it's easy to see how previous attempts to adapt it for the screen have ended in failure. But with an Amazonian budget and and ever-more capable CGI, now might be the perfect time to try.

Imagine that you are making a smoothie—an idea smoothie, to be exact. Oh, and you're going to need the biggest brain blender you can conjure, because we're going to be cramming a whole lot of ideas into this one.

First pour in some hackers and skateboard punks; next, a few dashes of detective work and World War II history. Sprinkle in some Sumerian mythology, Catholicism and other flavors of Christianity, and a bit Aleut culture, then toss in a couple of motorcycles, guns, and tech trinkets. Jostle the ingredients to make room for a few more: virtual reality, global conspiracies, memetics, linguistics, and dystopia.

Welcome to Snow Crash , which takes the above-mentioned ideas (along with many more), whirls them all together, and produces a fast-pasted, irreverent romp through a future that's just around the corner. And we do mean just around the corner—because while some of the inventions seem a tad far-fetched (cybernetic guard dogs, really?), it's hard not to see parallels to our own world in the corporate world, security-patrolled suburban enclaves, and uneven distribution of wealth that fill this book.


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