WEFOUNDelantris sequel


Before his bestselling Mistborn and Stormlight Archive series, Brandon Sanderson wrote a standalone novel called Elantris . Set ten years after the fall of the magical city of Elantris, it tells the stories of three main characters: Raoden, a Crown Prince exiled to the ruins of the fallen city; Sarene, a foreign princess who quickly becomes embroiled in the nation’s political intrigues; and Hrathen, a priest who believes that saving the country from an invasion depends upon the conversion of its people.

As with many fantasy novels, the magic system is a central component of the story, and Sanderson has done an excellent job of creating an internally consistent one. All of the glyphs used for magic are based on a single, simple design—two curved lines and a dot—which is repeated, reoriented, or built upon to create a wide array of different patterns. These glyphs are also ideograms that represent words (similar to Japanese kanji); characters typically have one in their names. This well-thought-out magic system and its integration into the culture goes a long way towards making the setting feel real.

The book also gives us interesting, complex characters. The one I liked best, Hrathen, is the central antagonist of the plot. Without giving too much away, I will say that he becomes a more complex character as the story progresses, which makes the back-and-forth plotting between himself and Sarene very engaging.

Arelon's new capital, Kae, crouches in the shadow of Elantris. Princess Sarene of Teod arrives for a marriage of state with Crown Prince Raoden, hoping -- based on their correspondence -- to also find love. She finds instead that Raoden has died and she is considered his widow. Both Teod and Arelon are under threat as the last remaining holdouts against the imperial ambitions of the ruthless religious fanatics of Fjordell. So Sarene decides to use her new status to counter the machinations of Hrathen, a Fjordell high priest who has come to Kae to convert Arelon and claim it for his emperor and his god.

But neither Sarene nor Hrathen suspect the truth about Prince Raoden. Stricken by the same curse that ruined Elantris, Raoden was secretly exiled by his father to the dark city. His struggle to help the wretches trapped there begins a series of events that will bring hope to Arelon, and perhaps reveal the secret of Elantris itself.

A rare epic fantasy that doesn't recycle the classics and that is a complete and satisfying story in one volume, Elantris is fleet and fun, full of surprises and characters to care about. It's also the wonderful debut of a welcome new star in the constellation of fantasy.

This new edition begins with a preface by author Dan Wells, the first person to read the completed novel, and a new afterword by Sanderson explaining how he came to write the book and its place in the Cosmere, the unified universe of all his Tor novels.

Also included is an expanded version of the "Ars Arcanum" appendix, with more of the technical details of the book's magic that fans can never get enough of.

Elantris was truly a milestone both for Sanderson and for the genre of epic fantasy. It deserves this special treatment, something Tor has done only once before, with Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game . Sanderson fans old and new will be excited to discover it.

Before his bestselling Mistborn and Stormlight Archive series, Brandon Sanderson wrote a standalone novel called Elantris . Set ten years after the fall of the magical city of Elantris, it tells the stories of three main characters: Raoden, a Crown Prince exiled to the ruins of the fallen city; Sarene, a foreign princess who quickly becomes embroiled in the nation’s political intrigues; and Hrathen, a priest who believes that saving the country from an invasion depends upon the conversion of its people.

As with many fantasy novels, the magic system is a central component of the story, and Sanderson has done an excellent job of creating an internally consistent one. All of the glyphs used for magic are based on a single, simple design—two curved lines and a dot—which is repeated, reoriented, or built upon to create a wide array of different patterns. These glyphs are also ideograms that represent words (similar to Japanese kanji); characters typically have one in their names. This well-thought-out magic system and its integration into the culture goes a long way towards making the setting feel real.

The book also gives us interesting, complex characters. The one I liked best, Hrathen, is the central antagonist of the plot. Without giving too much away, I will say that he becomes a more complex character as the story progresses, which makes the back-and-forth plotting between himself and Sarene very engaging.

Before his bestselling Mistborn and Stormlight Archive series, Brandon Sanderson wrote a standalone novel called Elantris . Set ten years after the fall of the magical city of Elantris, it tells the stories of three main characters: Raoden, a Crown Prince exiled to the ruins of the fallen city; Sarene, a foreign princess who quickly becomes embroiled in the nation’s political intrigues; and Hrathen, a priest who believes that saving the country from an invasion depends upon the conversion of its people.

As with many fantasy novels, the magic system is a central component of the story, and Sanderson has done an excellent job of creating an internally consistent one. All of the glyphs used for magic are based on a single, simple design—two curved lines and a dot—which is repeated, reoriented, or built upon to create a wide array of different patterns. These glyphs are also ideograms that represent words (similar to Japanese kanji); characters typically have one in their names. This well-thought-out magic system and its integration into the culture goes a long way towards making the setting feel real.

The book also gives us interesting, complex characters. The one I liked best, Hrathen, is the central antagonist of the plot. Without giving too much away, I will say that he becomes a more complex character as the story progresses, which makes the back-and-forth plotting between himself and Sarene very engaging.

Arelon's new capital, Kae, crouches in the shadow of Elantris. Princess Sarene of Teod arrives for a marriage of state with Crown Prince Raoden, hoping -- based on their correspondence -- to also find love. She finds instead that Raoden has died and she is considered his widow. Both Teod and Arelon are under threat as the last remaining holdouts against the imperial ambitions of the ruthless religious fanatics of Fjordell. So Sarene decides to use her new status to counter the machinations of Hrathen, a Fjordell high priest who has come to Kae to convert Arelon and claim it for his emperor and his god.

But neither Sarene nor Hrathen suspect the truth about Prince Raoden. Stricken by the same curse that ruined Elantris, Raoden was secretly exiled by his father to the dark city. His struggle to help the wretches trapped there begins a series of events that will bring hope to Arelon, and perhaps reveal the secret of Elantris itself.

A rare epic fantasy that doesn't recycle the classics and that is a complete and satisfying story in one volume, Elantris is fleet and fun, full of surprises and characters to care about. It's also the wonderful debut of a welcome new star in the constellation of fantasy.


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