WEFOUNDBallots Keep (2 Book Series)


A fundamental principle of parliamentary law, and Robert’s Rules, is that decisions are made only by the members present in a properly called meeting at which a quorum is present. However, sometimes you need to extend voting rights to members who can’t physically be there to vote. In this case, you have a couple options.

If anything’s likely to cause trouble for a group, it’s proxy voting. Voting by proxy, which is giving somebody a power of attorney to cast a vote for you, is inconsistent with the fundamental concepts that voting rights are not transferable and members must be present at the time a vote is taken.

Voting by mail is a trade-off: You give up the benefits of discussion and debate in favor of giving all your members an opportunity to vote. Voting by mail probably isn’t worth the extra expense if most of your members can make it to meetings. But in large state, national, or international organizations that don’t have some sort of delegate assembly, mail voting in elections (or to decide bylaw amendments) may make sense.

Next time you go to the store, share your shopping list on Keep and watch as items get checked off in real time. No need for text messages back and forth. Get things done together, faster.

A fundamental principle of parliamentary law, and Robert’s Rules, is that decisions are made only by the members present in a properly called meeting at which a quorum is present. However, sometimes you need to extend voting rights to members who can’t physically be there to vote. In this case, you have a couple options.

If anything’s likely to cause trouble for a group, it’s proxy voting. Voting by proxy, which is giving somebody a power of attorney to cast a vote for you, is inconsistent with the fundamental concepts that voting rights are not transferable and members must be present at the time a vote is taken.

Voting by mail is a trade-off: You give up the benefits of discussion and debate in favor of giving all your members an opportunity to vote. Voting by mail probably isn’t worth the extra expense if most of your members can make it to meetings. But in large state, national, or international organizations that don’t have some sort of delegate assembly, mail voting in elections (or to decide bylaw amendments) may make sense.

A fundamental principle of parliamentary law, and Robert’s Rules, is that decisions are made only by the members present in a properly called meeting at which a quorum is present. However, sometimes you need to extend voting rights to members who can’t physically be there to vote. In this case, you have a couple options.

If anything’s likely to cause trouble for a group, it’s proxy voting. Voting by proxy, which is giving somebody a power of attorney to cast a vote for you, is inconsistent with the fundamental concepts that voting rights are not transferable and members must be present at the time a vote is taken.

Voting by mail is a trade-off: You give up the benefits of discussion and debate in favor of giving all your members an opportunity to vote. Voting by mail probably isn’t worth the extra expense if most of your members can make it to meetings. But in large state, national, or international organizations that don’t have some sort of delegate assembly, mail voting in elections (or to decide bylaw amendments) may make sense.

Next time you go to the store, share your shopping list on Keep and watch as items get checked off in real time. No need for text messages back and forth. Get things done together, faster.

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