WEFOUNDLost Horizon: A Novel


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Author:   James Hilton
Nationality:  English
Published:  1933
Publisher:   Macmillan Publishers

I hope you've been having a fine day. I recently finished Lost Horizon , the eighth novel on my list , and I'm finally ready to write a review about it. Of all the sci-fi stories I've read so far,  Lost Horizon is probably my least favourite. Now that's not to say that it was bad, just that I'm not totally crazy about it as I am some of the other stories I've read. So let's get right into the plot and what I think are the two major themes.

Thank you for subscribing to The Sci-Fi Novel! Please check your email for the link to confirm your subscription and receive the Quick Start Guide.

Author:   James Hilton
Nationality:  English
Published:  1933
Publisher:   Macmillan Publishers

I hope you've been having a fine day. I recently finished Lost Horizon , the eighth novel on my list , and I'm finally ready to write a review about it. Of all the sci-fi stories I've read so far,  Lost Horizon is probably my least favourite. Now that's not to say that it was bad, just that I'm not totally crazy about it as I am some of the other stories I've read. So let's get right into the plot and what I think are the two major themes.

Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the 1933 novel Lost Horizon by British author James Hilton . Hilton describes Shangri-La as a mystical, harmonious valley, gently guided from a lamasery , enclosed in the western end of the Kunlun Mountains . Shangri-La has become synonymous with any earthly paradise, and particularly a mythical Himalayan utopia – a permanently happy land, isolated from the outside world. In the novel Lost Horizon , the people who live at Shangri-La are almost immortal, living hundreds of years beyond the normal lifespan and only very slowly aging in appearance. The name also evokes the imagery of exoticism of the Orient .

In the ancient Tibetan scriptures, existence of seven such places is mentioned as Nghe-Beyul Khembalung . [1] Khembalung is one of several beyuls ("hidden lands" similar to Shangri-La) believed to have been created by Padmasambhava in the 9th century as idyllic, sacred places of refuge for Buddhists during times of strife (Reinhard, 1978).

The phrase "Shangri-La" most probably comes from the Tibetan ཞང་ ,"Shang" – a district of Ü-Tsang , north of Tashilhunpo [2] " + རི , pronounced "ri", "Mountain" = "Shang Mountain" + , Mountain Pass, which suggests that the area is accessed to, or is named by, "Shang Mountain Pass".


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