WEFOUNDVikram and Betaal - Classic Tales (Illustrated)


Here, Vedhaa is trying to convince Vikram of the blurring lines between legality and illegality, morality and immorality, and there, Raghavan is trying to tell the same to Manu Verma about the ‘façade’ of righteousness: Take all the laws out and every so-called ‘clean’ Manu Verma has a hidden Raghavan in him ready to unleash all evil for the sake of survival. Interestingly, it’s the same concept that’s used in Nolan’s THE DARK KNIGHT of 2008! Joker wants to conduct a ‘social’ experiment

to reveal that ‘innocent civilians’ are the same as ‘scum-bags’ without the masks of laws and societal-morality on. ‘AKS’ later-on, veers into supernatural realm: However, the basic concept of lines blurring between what’s good and evil, what’s morality, what’s ethics, is the common thread running through these three movies.

Coming to performances, this is a Madhavan performance for the decade, ALL THE WAY. He is stunning; absolutely outstanding in his rendition of a character that starts off as a cocky cop to a confused-being to being a sceptic of himself and the world and the concepts of morality and ethics in general: With that salt-and-pepper stubble, he nails brilliantly the state of a mind littered with those crests of confusions and those troughs of so-called answers aided by whiskey and Vedaa’s talks. This is not an award-worthy performance, but a performance deserving bloody multiple awards. Hats-off! [All the pre-paid talk-time awards like Pee, Starless awards, please stay away.]

Here, Vedhaa is trying to convince Vikram of the blurring lines between legality and illegality, morality and immorality, and there, Raghavan is trying to tell the same to Manu Verma about the ‘façade’ of righteousness: Take all the laws out and every so-called ‘clean’ Manu Verma has a hidden Raghavan in him ready to unleash all evil for the sake of survival. Interestingly, it’s the same concept that’s used in Nolan’s THE DARK KNIGHT of 2008! Joker wants to conduct a ‘social’ experiment

to reveal that ‘innocent civilians’ are the same as ‘scum-bags’ without the masks of laws and societal-morality on. ‘AKS’ later-on, veers into supernatural realm: However, the basic concept of lines blurring between what’s good and evil, what’s morality, what’s ethics, is the common thread running through these three movies.

Coming to performances, this is a Madhavan performance for the decade, ALL THE WAY. He is stunning; absolutely outstanding in his rendition of a character that starts off as a cocky cop to a confused-being to being a sceptic of himself and the world and the concepts of morality and ethics in general: With that salt-and-pepper stubble, he nails brilliantly the state of a mind littered with those crests of confusions and those troughs of so-called answers aided by whiskey and Vedaa’s talks. This is not an award-worthy performance, but a performance deserving bloody multiple awards. Hats-off! [All the pre-paid talk-time awards like Pee, Starless awards, please stay away.]

Vikram was the name of a king. He ruled over a city on the banks of Godavari River. He was very famous for his bravery and courage.

The king handed it over to his treasurer. Thereafter, the sage kept coming to the court daily to gift a fruit to the king. The king could not understand the reason behind this behaviour. But still he did not try to find out the sage’s intentions.

However, one morning, Vikram noticed a monkey sitting on the palace wall and gave the fruit to it. The monkey had started eating the fruit when suddenly a dazzling gem fell out of it. The King was very surprised. He immediately ordered his treasurer to get him all the fruits kept in the storage. The fruits had gone bad but when the king had them crushed, each one of them yielded a precious gem. The generous King donated all these gems to the poor and waited for the sage’s visit to the court.

So, anxious investors act like Vikram (the king in the famous Indian fable Vikram and Betaal ), and stock prices play Betaal (the ghoul who keeps escaping Vikram). Stocks simply aren’t available at valuations you like. Stock prices defy investment logic and investors often get exasperated trying to act on their own investment logic. Stock prices regularly fly off their shoulders to reach higher levels. For the herd, it is celebration hour. They buy the rise and merrily party on. But if you expect value investors and ideators to be happy, think again.

To the typical value investor, bull markets actually turn out to be a depressing phase. Meet a gathering of value-investing peers and you will see a dull, sombre mood. Conversations will inevitably be marked by exasperation. Strangely, higher valuations upset this gathering even as the street is cheering buoyant stock prices.

Losing an opportunity to buy at favourable valuations tends to greatly upset devout value investors. But not all members of the gathering will be upset. There will always be the silent, sober ones with a mind of their own.

Pebbles presents "Arabian Nights & Vikram and Betaal" , which are a phenomenal success world over, ever since its emergence. The curious children will be fascinated by these mysteriously interesting stories. 

Pebbles presents "Arabian Nights & Vikram and Betaal" , which are a phenomenal success world over, ever since its emergence. The curious children will be fascinated by these mysteriously interesting stories. 

Pebbles presents "Arabian Nights" , which are a phenomenal success world over, ever since its emergence. The curious children will be fascinated by these mysteriously interesting stories. Aladdin's magic lamp and Sindbad's voyages will kindle  interest, while Genie, Ogress & Alibaba spell the magic chants to make people's wish come true and differentiate between good & bad. The style adopted to convey these stories are very simple and the children can easily understand and enjoy  every bit of the stories.

Here, Vedhaa is trying to convince Vikram of the blurring lines between legality and illegality, morality and immorality, and there, Raghavan is trying to tell the same to Manu Verma about the ‘façade’ of righteousness: Take all the laws out and every so-called ‘clean’ Manu Verma has a hidden Raghavan in him ready to unleash all evil for the sake of survival. Interestingly, it’s the same concept that’s used in Nolan’s THE DARK KNIGHT of 2008! Joker wants to conduct a ‘social’ experiment

to reveal that ‘innocent civilians’ are the same as ‘scum-bags’ without the masks of laws and societal-morality on. ‘AKS’ later-on, veers into supernatural realm: However, the basic concept of lines blurring between what’s good and evil, what’s morality, what’s ethics, is the common thread running through these three movies.

Coming to performances, this is a Madhavan performance for the decade, ALL THE WAY. He is stunning; absolutely outstanding in his rendition of a character that starts off as a cocky cop to a confused-being to being a sceptic of himself and the world and the concepts of morality and ethics in general: With that salt-and-pepper stubble, he nails brilliantly the state of a mind littered with those crests of confusions and those troughs of so-called answers aided by whiskey and Vedaa’s talks. This is not an award-worthy performance, but a performance deserving bloody multiple awards. Hats-off! [All the pre-paid talk-time awards like Pee, Starless awards, please stay away.]

Vikram was the name of a king. He ruled over a city on the banks of Godavari River. He was very famous for his bravery and courage.

The king handed it over to his treasurer. Thereafter, the sage kept coming to the court daily to gift a fruit to the king. The king could not understand the reason behind this behaviour. But still he did not try to find out the sage’s intentions.

However, one morning, Vikram noticed a monkey sitting on the palace wall and gave the fruit to it. The monkey had started eating the fruit when suddenly a dazzling gem fell out of it. The King was very surprised. He immediately ordered his treasurer to get him all the fruits kept in the storage. The fruits had gone bad but when the king had them crushed, each one of them yielded a precious gem. The generous King donated all these gems to the poor and waited for the sage’s visit to the court.

So, anxious investors act like Vikram (the king in the famous Indian fable Vikram and Betaal ), and stock prices play Betaal (the ghoul who keeps escaping Vikram). Stocks simply aren’t available at valuations you like. Stock prices defy investment logic and investors often get exasperated trying to act on their own investment logic. Stock prices regularly fly off their shoulders to reach higher levels. For the herd, it is celebration hour. They buy the rise and merrily party on. But if you expect value investors and ideators to be happy, think again.

To the typical value investor, bull markets actually turn out to be a depressing phase. Meet a gathering of value-investing peers and you will see a dull, sombre mood. Conversations will inevitably be marked by exasperation. Strangely, higher valuations upset this gathering even as the street is cheering buoyant stock prices.

Losing an opportunity to buy at favourable valuations tends to greatly upset devout value investors. But not all members of the gathering will be upset. There will always be the silent, sober ones with a mind of their own.

Here, Vedhaa is trying to convince Vikram of the blurring lines between legality and illegality, morality and immorality, and there, Raghavan is trying to tell the same to Manu Verma about the ‘façade’ of righteousness: Take all the laws out and every so-called ‘clean’ Manu Verma has a hidden Raghavan in him ready to unleash all evil for the sake of survival. Interestingly, it’s the same concept that’s used in Nolan’s THE DARK KNIGHT of 2008! Joker wants to conduct a ‘social’ experiment

to reveal that ‘innocent civilians’ are the same as ‘scum-bags’ without the masks of laws and societal-morality on. ‘AKS’ later-on, veers into supernatural realm: However, the basic concept of lines blurring between what’s good and evil, what’s morality, what’s ethics, is the common thread running through these three movies.

Coming to performances, this is a Madhavan performance for the decade, ALL THE WAY. He is stunning; absolutely outstanding in his rendition of a character that starts off as a cocky cop to a confused-being to being a sceptic of himself and the world and the concepts of morality and ethics in general: With that salt-and-pepper stubble, he nails brilliantly the state of a mind littered with those crests of confusions and those troughs of so-called answers aided by whiskey and Vedaa’s talks. This is not an award-worthy performance, but a performance deserving bloody multiple awards. Hats-off! [All the pre-paid talk-time awards like Pee, Starless awards, please stay away.]

Vikram was the name of a king. He ruled over a city on the banks of Godavari River. He was very famous for his bravery and courage.

The king handed it over to his treasurer. Thereafter, the sage kept coming to the court daily to gift a fruit to the king. The king could not understand the reason behind this behaviour. But still he did not try to find out the sage’s intentions.

However, one morning, Vikram noticed a monkey sitting on the palace wall and gave the fruit to it. The monkey had started eating the fruit when suddenly a dazzling gem fell out of it. The King was very surprised. He immediately ordered his treasurer to get him all the fruits kept in the storage. The fruits had gone bad but when the king had them crushed, each one of them yielded a precious gem. The generous King donated all these gems to the poor and waited for the sage’s visit to the court.


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