WEFOUND' The Longest Night ': Map Illustrated (Armageddon's Song) (Volume 4)


The Christmas season is often marked by expressions of joy, excitement, and happiness. It’s a time for family to gather and for churches to worship pointing to the hope that is found in the coming of the Christ child. However, this time of joy and expectation can often overshadow the pain and hurt many experience during this season, when the world's merriment puts their grief and sorrow in start relief.

One of the greatest acts of pastoral care in the Advent season is to offer a service known as a Service of the Longest Night . It’s a worship service scheduled around the winter solstice (the longest night of the calendar year) and it just happens to fall on or around December 21 st every year. As Dan Benedict notes : “it is also the traditional feast day for Saint Thomas the Apostle. This linkage invites making some connections between Thomas's struggle to believe the tale of Jesus' resurrection, the long nights just before Christmas, and the struggle with darkness and grief faced by those living with loss.”

Those gathered for this service will bring a variety of issues causing pain. The last thing you want to do is add to that pain by singing “Joy to the World” or “Hark the Herald Angels Sing.” As good as those hymns are, they are also a reminder of the part of the season your worshippers are coming to get a break from.  Advent hymns are often played in minor chords and have lyrics pointing to hope in the presence of mystery. These hymns will set a mood appropriate for a Service of the Longest Night.

John Donne had it worse in higher-latitude London than we do in upstate New York. In his dark and difficult winter solstice poem, “A Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy’s Day,” Donne writes of “scarce seven hours” of daylight; he’s egging the pudding there, but he certainly got less than eight on the year’s shortest day.

Here at the 42nd parallel, the almanac gives us nine plus a handful of minutes on December 21, a few dozen of which I’ll undoubtedly waste by sleeping in. It’s a bit rich to complain about the sunset rolling up on you at 4:28 p.m. when it takes an act of God to haul your carcass out of bed before eight, but it’s still rough to watch it get dim by midafternoon.

A dead time, a dark time, in a dark year. As I write this, Congress is busy forcing a sweeping and bitterly divisive bill through in the dead of night, its authors bending all their will toward a victory no matter what chaos might follow on its heels. The latest high-water mark in a season of despair. It feels dramatic to write that word — “despair” — but not inaccurate. Lately it seems that everywhere you look in the fearsome arena of national politics, there’s somebody powerful cheering for you to suffer. It takes a toll. It has on me, anyway.

The Christmas season is often marked by expressions of joy, excitement, and happiness. It’s a time for family to gather and for churches to worship pointing to the hope that is found in the coming of the Christ child. However, this time of joy and expectation can often overshadow the pain and hurt many experience during this season, when the world's merriment puts their grief and sorrow in start relief.

One of the greatest acts of pastoral care in the Advent season is to offer a service known as a Service of the Longest Night . It’s a worship service scheduled around the winter solstice (the longest night of the calendar year) and it just happens to fall on or around December 21 st every year. As Dan Benedict notes : “it is also the traditional feast day for Saint Thomas the Apostle. This linkage invites making some connections between Thomas's struggle to believe the tale of Jesus' resurrection, the long nights just before Christmas, and the struggle with darkness and grief faced by those living with loss.”

Those gathered for this service will bring a variety of issues causing pain. The last thing you want to do is add to that pain by singing “Joy to the World” or “Hark the Herald Angels Sing.” As good as those hymns are, they are also a reminder of the part of the season your worshippers are coming to get a break from.  Advent hymns are often played in minor chords and have lyrics pointing to hope in the presence of mystery. These hymns will set a mood appropriate for a Service of the Longest Night.

The Christmas season is often marked by expressions of joy, excitement, and happiness. It’s a time for family to gather and for churches to worship pointing to the hope that is found in the coming of the Christ child. However, this time of joy and expectation can often overshadow the pain and hurt many experience during this season, when the world's merriment puts their grief and sorrow in start relief.

One of the greatest acts of pastoral care in the Advent season is to offer a service known as a Service of the Longest Night . It’s a worship service scheduled around the winter solstice (the longest night of the calendar year) and it just happens to fall on or around December 21 st every year. As Dan Benedict notes : “it is also the traditional feast day for Saint Thomas the Apostle. This linkage invites making some connections between Thomas's struggle to believe the tale of Jesus' resurrection, the long nights just before Christmas, and the struggle with darkness and grief faced by those living with loss.”

Those gathered for this service will bring a variety of issues causing pain. The last thing you want to do is add to that pain by singing “Joy to the World” or “Hark the Herald Angels Sing.” As good as those hymns are, they are also a reminder of the part of the season your worshippers are coming to get a break from.  Advent hymns are often played in minor chords and have lyrics pointing to hope in the presence of mystery. These hymns will set a mood appropriate for a Service of the Longest Night.

John Donne had it worse in higher-latitude London than we do in upstate New York. In his dark and difficult winter solstice poem, “A Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy’s Day,” Donne writes of “scarce seven hours” of daylight; he’s egging the pudding there, but he certainly got less than eight on the year’s shortest day.

Here at the 42nd parallel, the almanac gives us nine plus a handful of minutes on December 21, a few dozen of which I’ll undoubtedly waste by sleeping in. It’s a bit rich to complain about the sunset rolling up on you at 4:28 p.m. when it takes an act of God to haul your carcass out of bed before eight, but it’s still rough to watch it get dim by midafternoon.

A dead time, a dark time, in a dark year. As I write this, Congress is busy forcing a sweeping and bitterly divisive bill through in the dead of night, its authors bending all their will toward a victory no matter what chaos might follow on its heels. The latest high-water mark in a season of despair. It feels dramatic to write that word — “despair” — but not inaccurate. Lately it seems that everywhere you look in the fearsome arena of national politics, there’s somebody powerful cheering for you to suffer. It takes a toll. It has on me, anyway.

Отель Гранд Будапешт (2014)
# 192 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Jennifer Aniston »
# 149 on STARmeter

A wealthy former mental patient goes home to her estate to rest and recuperate. While walking the grounds one day she hears the screams of a woman coming from underneath the ground who has ... See full summary  »


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