WEFOUNDTwentieth century interpretations of A portrait of the artist as a young man : a collection of critical essays


On the evening of November 20, 1894, Delaware Avenue just north of Allen Street was clogged with carriages and horses, and the sidewalks crowded with ladies and gentlemen making their way to Number 595, the former site of the Delaware Avenue Baptist Church. The ladies, many of whom arrived in plumed and feathered hats, wore long dresses of satin and velvet decorated with lace and brocade and adorned with necklaces of pearls, diamonds, and rubies. Inside, a grand social event was already in progress.

The occasion was a reception marking the formal opening of the Twentieth Century Club. More than one hundred and forty club members welcomed the guests, among whom were some of the most distinguished citizens of Buffalo. An orchestra played behind potted palms while a Rochester caterer served refreshments in the dining room amid red shaded candles and great bouquets of chrysanthemums. Guests wandered through the new clubhouse inspecting the rooms and remarking on the astonishing transformation achieved by Green and Wicks, the prominent Buffalo architects who redesigned the former church to accommodate the needs of the club.

Somewhere in the center of that glittering evening, welcoming the guests and overseeing the details of all that transpired, was the calm, capable presence of Miss Charlotte Mulligan. Miss Mulligan, a music teacher and music editor at the Buffalo Courier Express, founded the Twentieth Century Club and served as its president for the first four years of its existence. In an age when women were politically disenfranchised and seldom stepped out of their prescribed social roles, Charlotte was a mover and shaker.

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On the evening of November 20, 1894, Delaware Avenue just north of Allen Street was clogged with carriages and horses, and the sidewalks crowded with ladies and gentlemen making their way to Number 595, the former site of the Delaware Avenue Baptist Church. The ladies, many of whom arrived in plumed and feathered hats, wore long dresses of satin and velvet decorated with lace and brocade and adorned with necklaces of pearls, diamonds, and rubies. Inside, a grand social event was already in progress.

The occasion was a reception marking the formal opening of the Twentieth Century Club. More than one hundred and forty club members welcomed the guests, among whom were some of the most distinguished citizens of Buffalo. An orchestra played behind potted palms while a Rochester caterer served refreshments in the dining room amid red shaded candles and great bouquets of chrysanthemums. Guests wandered through the new clubhouse inspecting the rooms and remarking on the astonishing transformation achieved by Green and Wicks, the prominent Buffalo architects who redesigned the former church to accommodate the needs of the club.

Somewhere in the center of that glittering evening, welcoming the guests and overseeing the details of all that transpired, was the calm, capable presence of Miss Charlotte Mulligan. Miss Mulligan, a music teacher and music editor at the Buffalo Courier Express, founded the Twentieth Century Club and served as its president for the first four years of its existence. In an age when women were politically disenfranchised and seldom stepped out of their prescribed social roles, Charlotte was a mover and shaker.

  has been added to your font request.   fonts have been added to your font request.   has been added to your font request.   has been added to "   " request.   has been added to "   " list. VIEW HERE

  has been added to your font request.   fonts have been added to your font request.   has been added to your font request.   has been added to "   " request.   has been added to "   " list. VIEW HERE

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On the evening of November 20, 1894, Delaware Avenue just north of Allen Street was clogged with carriages and horses, and the sidewalks crowded with ladies and gentlemen making their way to Number 595, the former site of the Delaware Avenue Baptist Church. The ladies, many of whom arrived in plumed and feathered hats, wore long dresses of satin and velvet decorated with lace and brocade and adorned with necklaces of pearls, diamonds, and rubies. Inside, a grand social event was already in progress.

The occasion was a reception marking the formal opening of the Twentieth Century Club. More than one hundred and forty club members welcomed the guests, among whom were some of the most distinguished citizens of Buffalo. An orchestra played behind potted palms while a Rochester caterer served refreshments in the dining room amid red shaded candles and great bouquets of chrysanthemums. Guests wandered through the new clubhouse inspecting the rooms and remarking on the astonishing transformation achieved by Green and Wicks, the prominent Buffalo architects who redesigned the former church to accommodate the needs of the club.

Somewhere in the center of that glittering evening, welcoming the guests and overseeing the details of all that transpired, was the calm, capable presence of Miss Charlotte Mulligan. Miss Mulligan, a music teacher and music editor at the Buffalo Courier Express, founded the Twentieth Century Club and served as its president for the first four years of its existence. In an age when women were politically disenfranchised and seldom stepped out of their prescribed social roles, Charlotte was a mover and shaker.