WEFOUNDDoctor Who: The Good Soldier


[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “ The Good Doctor ” episode, “22 Steps.”]

“The Good Doctor” is a way for viewers who have never met a person with autism to get to know more about the differences in neurology and behaviors that may accompany the disorder. For the show’s central character Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), a surgical resident with autism and savant syndrome, he hasn’t met anyone with autism either, at least not until Monday’s episode.

When a young man named Liam (Coby Bird) is wheeled in on a gurney, Shaun immediately understands why the boy is struggling with the nurses. Far from needing to be restrained, it turns out he has autism and doesn’t like to be touched. Shaun proves to be instrumental in understanding Liam’s needs and relaying them to the hospital staff. IndieWire spoke with series creator David Shore to get his take on the insightful episode.

Autism is a tricky subject to depict correctly, but ABC’s new fall medical drama The Good Doctor  isn’t shy about tackling it head-on.

Based on a South Korean drama, Doctor stars  Bates Motel alum Freddie Highmore as Dr. Shaun Murphy, a young surgeon and autistic savant who joins the staff of a prestigious hospital. But the hospital’s board members worry that Shaun’s lack of communication skills could make him a liability in the operating room.

“There’s going to be people who think he doesn’t belong there for a while. He’s going to have to prove himself,” creator David Shore ( House ) explained at the Television Critics Association press tour on Sunday. But Shaun’s unique perspective quickly helps him win over his colleagues: “He’s a catalyst for change among the other doctors. His different way of looking at the world will, I think, inspire them.”

Highmore was born on 14 February 1992 in Camden Town, London, into a show business family. [1] His mother, Sue Latimer, is a talent agent whose clients include actors Daniel Radcliffe and Imelda Staunton, and his father, Edward Highmore, is an actor. He has a younger brother named Bertie. His home is in Highgate, North London. [2] Highmore was educated at a primary school in Hampstead Garden Suburb in Hampstead and at Highgate School, an independent school, followed by Emmanuel College at the University of Cambridge, where he earned a Double First in Spanish and Arabic. [3]

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “ The Good Doctor ” episode, “22 Steps.”]

“The Good Doctor” is a way for viewers who have never met a person with autism to get to know more about the differences in neurology and behaviors that may accompany the disorder. For the show’s central character Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), a surgical resident with autism and savant syndrome, he hasn’t met anyone with autism either, at least not until Monday’s episode.

When a young man named Liam (Coby Bird) is wheeled in on a gurney, Shaun immediately understands why the boy is struggling with the nurses. Far from needing to be restrained, it turns out he has autism and doesn’t like to be touched. Shaun proves to be instrumental in understanding Liam’s needs and relaying them to the hospital staff. IndieWire spoke with series creator David Shore to get his take on the insightful episode.

Autism is a tricky subject to depict correctly, but ABC’s new fall medical drama The Good Doctor  isn’t shy about tackling it head-on.

Based on a South Korean drama, Doctor stars  Bates Motel alum Freddie Highmore as Dr. Shaun Murphy, a young surgeon and autistic savant who joins the staff of a prestigious hospital. But the hospital’s board members worry that Shaun’s lack of communication skills could make him a liability in the operating room.

“There’s going to be people who think he doesn’t belong there for a while. He’s going to have to prove himself,” creator David Shore ( House ) explained at the Television Critics Association press tour on Sunday. But Shaun’s unique perspective quickly helps him win over his colleagues: “He’s a catalyst for change among the other doctors. His different way of looking at the world will, I think, inspire them.”

Highmore was born on 14 February 1992 in Camden Town, London, into a show business family. [1] His mother, Sue Latimer, is a talent agent whose clients include actors Daniel Radcliffe and Imelda Staunton, and his father, Edward Highmore, is an actor. He has a younger brother named Bertie. His home is in Highgate, North London. [2] Highmore was educated at a primary school in Hampstead Garden Suburb in Hampstead and at Highgate School, an independent school, followed by Emmanuel College at the University of Cambridge, where he earned a Double First in Spanish and Arabic. [3]

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[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “ The Good Doctor ” episode, “22 Steps.”]

“The Good Doctor” is a way for viewers who have never met a person with autism to get to know more about the differences in neurology and behaviors that may accompany the disorder. For the show’s central character Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), a surgical resident with autism and savant syndrome, he hasn’t met anyone with autism either, at least not until Monday’s episode.

When a young man named Liam (Coby Bird) is wheeled in on a gurney, Shaun immediately understands why the boy is struggling with the nurses. Far from needing to be restrained, it turns out he has autism and doesn’t like to be touched. Shaun proves to be instrumental in understanding Liam’s needs and relaying them to the hospital staff. IndieWire spoke with series creator David Shore to get his take on the insightful episode.

Autism is a tricky subject to depict correctly, but ABC’s new fall medical drama The Good Doctor  isn’t shy about tackling it head-on.

Based on a South Korean drama, Doctor stars  Bates Motel alum Freddie Highmore as Dr. Shaun Murphy, a young surgeon and autistic savant who joins the staff of a prestigious hospital. But the hospital’s board members worry that Shaun’s lack of communication skills could make him a liability in the operating room.

“There’s going to be people who think he doesn’t belong there for a while. He’s going to have to prove himself,” creator David Shore ( House ) explained at the Television Critics Association press tour on Sunday. But Shaun’s unique perspective quickly helps him win over his colleagues: “He’s a catalyst for change among the other doctors. His different way of looking at the world will, I think, inspire them.”

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “ The Good Doctor ” episode, “22 Steps.”]

“The Good Doctor” is a way for viewers who have never met a person with autism to get to know more about the differences in neurology and behaviors that may accompany the disorder. For the show’s central character Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), a surgical resident with autism and savant syndrome, he hasn’t met anyone with autism either, at least not until Monday’s episode.

When a young man named Liam (Coby Bird) is wheeled in on a gurney, Shaun immediately understands why the boy is struggling with the nurses. Far from needing to be restrained, it turns out he has autism and doesn’t like to be touched. Shaun proves to be instrumental in understanding Liam’s needs and relaying them to the hospital staff. IndieWire spoke with series creator David Shore to get his take on the insightful episode.


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