WEFOUNDA Curious Tale of the In-Between


As comic book writers go, Akira Yoshida boasts an impressive résumé. In two years, he went from complete obscurity to working on popular titles such as “Thor: Son of Asgard” and “X-Men: Age of Apocalypse.” The latter was made into a major mainstream movie in 2016 that grossed more than half a billion dollars.

There’s just one issue. “Akira Yoshida” was a pen name used by C.B. Cebulski in 2004 and 2005 as he broke into comic book writing by pretending to be a promising Japanese scribe. Although Cebulski has lived in Japan, he is a white American.

Although it was long-rumored in the comic book world that Yoshida was, indeed, Cebulski, no one investigated deeply. Since he retired the pseudonym fairly quickly, the rumors might have died.

From New York Times bestselling author Lauren DeStefano comes a delightful tale of a girl who can talk to ghosts that’s perfect for fans of Neil Gaiman and Holly Black.

Pram Bellamy is special--she can talk to ghosts. She doesn't have too many friends amongst the living, but that's all right. She has her books, she has her aunts, and she has her best friend, the ghostly Felix.

Then Pram meets Clarence, a boy from school who has also lost a parent and is looking for answers. Together they arrive at the door of the mysterious Lady Savant, who promises to help. But this spiritualist knows the true nature of Pram's power, and what she has planned is more terrifying than any ghost.

As comic book writers go, Akira Yoshida boasts an impressive résumé. In two years, he went from complete obscurity to working on popular titles such as “Thor: Son of Asgard” and “X-Men: Age of Apocalypse.” The latter was made into a major mainstream movie in 2016 that grossed more than half a billion dollars.

There’s just one issue. “Akira Yoshida” was a pen name used by C.B. Cebulski in 2004 and 2005 as he broke into comic book writing by pretending to be a promising Japanese scribe. Although Cebulski has lived in Japan, he is a white American.

Although it was long-rumored in the comic book world that Yoshida was, indeed, Cebulski, no one investigated deeply. Since he retired the pseudonym fairly quickly, the rumors might have died.

From New York Times bestselling author Lauren DeStefano comes a delightful tale of a girl who can talk to ghosts that’s perfect for fans of Neil Gaiman and Holly Black.

Pram Bellamy is special--she can talk to ghosts. She doesn't have too many friends amongst the living, but that's all right. She has her books, she has her aunts, and she has her best friend, the ghostly Felix.

Then Pram meets Clarence, a boy from school who has also lost a parent and is looking for answers. Together they arrive at the door of the mysterious Lady Savant, who promises to help. But this spiritualist knows the true nature of Pram's power, and what she has planned is more terrifying than any ghost.

Mark Haddon’s hugely popular tale of a teenager and a canine death, The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time receives a stage makeover courtesy of award-winning playwright Simon Stephens.

The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time is the story of Christopher, a 15 year old boy who becomes a suspect when Mrs Shears’ dog, Wellington, is speared with a garden fork.

Though exceptional at maths, Christopher cannot interpret every day life. He has never passed the end of the road by himself, he hates to be touched and he doesn’t trust strangers. Yet he embarks on a mission to discover the truth about Wellington’s untimely death, recording everything in a notebook. His detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a frightening journey as he tries to solve The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time.

As comic book writers go, Akira Yoshida boasts an impressive résumé. In two years, he went from complete obscurity to working on popular titles such as “Thor: Son of Asgard” and “X-Men: Age of Apocalypse.” The latter was made into a major mainstream movie in 2016 that grossed more than half a billion dollars.

There’s just one issue. “Akira Yoshida” was a pen name used by C.B. Cebulski in 2004 and 2005 as he broke into comic book writing by pretending to be a promising Japanese scribe. Although Cebulski has lived in Japan, he is a white American.

Although it was long-rumored in the comic book world that Yoshida was, indeed, Cebulski, no one investigated deeply. Since he retired the pseudonym fairly quickly, the rumors might have died.

As comic book writers go, Akira Yoshida boasts an impressive résumé. In two years, he went from complete obscurity to working on popular titles such as “Thor: Son of Asgard” and “X-Men: Age of Apocalypse.” The latter was made into a major mainstream movie in 2016 that grossed more than half a billion dollars.

There’s just one issue. “Akira Yoshida” was a pen name used by C.B. Cebulski in 2004 and 2005 as he broke into comic book writing by pretending to be a promising Japanese scribe. Although Cebulski has lived in Japan, he is a white American.

Although it was long-rumored in the comic book world that Yoshida was, indeed, Cebulski, no one investigated deeply. Since he retired the pseudonym fairly quickly, the rumors might have died.

From New York Times bestselling author Lauren DeStefano comes a delightful tale of a girl who can talk to ghosts that’s perfect for fans of Neil Gaiman and Holly Black.

Pram Bellamy is special--she can talk to ghosts. She doesn't have too many friends amongst the living, but that's all right. She has her books, she has her aunts, and she has her best friend, the ghostly Felix.

Then Pram meets Clarence, a boy from school who has also lost a parent and is looking for answers. Together they arrive at the door of the mysterious Lady Savant, who promises to help. But this spiritualist knows the true nature of Pram's power, and what she has planned is more terrifying than any ghost.

Mark Haddon’s hugely popular tale of a teenager and a canine death, The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time receives a stage makeover courtesy of award-winning playwright Simon Stephens.

The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time is the story of Christopher, a 15 year old boy who becomes a suspect when Mrs Shears’ dog, Wellington, is speared with a garden fork.

Though exceptional at maths, Christopher cannot interpret every day life. He has never passed the end of the road by himself, he hates to be touched and he doesn’t trust strangers. Yet he embarks on a mission to discover the truth about Wellington’s untimely death, recording everything in a notebook. His detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a frightening journey as he tries to solve The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time.

When I heard that Lauren DeStefano was writing a middle grade, I couldn’t wait to read it. I’m a big fan of her work and, as a writer, I’m inspired by her beautiful prose and captivating stories. I finished A Curious Tale of the In-Between today and it didn’t disappoint. It was beautiful. If middle grade fiction is this good, then I really need to read more of it.

Some of the themes were pretty dark, and no, I’m not talking about the ghosts! A Curious Tale tackles themes like death, mental health and suicide. Some people might find that a bit too much, but I loved this book for it. I’m an advocate of literature being open and willing to discuss topics that are often pushed to one side. Within the first couple of pages I was reminded of Neil Gaiman’s work., or even a Tim Burton film, and I knew I was going to love it.

Lauren weaves other themes through this haunting book. Friendship and family play a big part in the narrative. Pram’s only friend is a ghost, and her aunt’s are concerned about her tendency to talk to ‘imaginary friends’. But Pram is concerned about other things. She’s growing up, and she wants to know the truth about her parents.


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