WEFOUNDThe Return of William Shakespeare (Lost Race and Adult Fantasy Ser.)


The X-Files returns for its eleventh season on Wednesday, and it appears it will bring with it the long-awaited reappearance of the show's most mysterious character.

In this exclusive sneak peek of the premiere, a harried Scully ( Gillian Anderson ) explains to Mulder ( David Duchovny ) over the phone that he is in dire need of their son William, who was given up for adoption in Season 9. "I have to find our son. You need him, and I need you," Scully says before a series of migraine-inducing visions cause her to lose control of her phone and drop to the floor.

As Scully hears the voices of Mulder, the Cigarette Smoking Man ( William B. Davis ) and others discuss William's important role in the series' over-arching mythology, she sees the pained face of a young man seemingly experiencing similar agony to her own. Could this young man be our first glimpse of the teenaged William, who should be around 15 years old at this point? And if so, what's causing both him and Scully's such pain?

The X-Files returns for its eleventh season on Wednesday, and it appears it will bring with it the long-awaited reappearance of the show's most mysterious character.

In this exclusive sneak peek of the premiere, a harried Scully ( Gillian Anderson ) explains to Mulder ( David Duchovny ) over the phone that he is in dire need of their son William, who was given up for adoption in Season 9. "I have to find our son. You need him, and I need you," Scully says before a series of migraine-inducing visions cause her to lose control of her phone and drop to the floor.

As Scully hears the voices of Mulder, the Cigarette Smoking Man ( William B. Davis ) and others discuss William's important role in the series' over-arching mythology, she sees the pained face of a young man seemingly experiencing similar agony to her own. Could this young man be our first glimpse of the teenaged William, who should be around 15 years old at this point? And if so, what's causing both him and Scully's such pain?

I n the late summer of 1842, two British armies marched through Afghanistan to avenge the destruction of a force sent three years earlier to effect a regime change in the central Asian kingdom. That mission – one of the largest military expeditions mounted by British troops and their local reinforcements in decades — had gone disastrously wrong. Much of the force had been wiped out as it attempted an ignominious retreat from Kabul, leaving a weak and disillusioned ruler on the throne, and the reputation of the most fearsome military machine in the world badly tarnished. The task of the two armies sent back to the Afghan capital thus had a simple task: retribution.

The British, who had entered Afghanistan in the first place in part to further trade relations west of the East India Company's extant territory, destroyed the main Kabul bazaar, a stunning Mughal-era monument and the biggest commercial centre for a thousand or so miles around. Their point made, they then withdrew. On his last day in what would become Afghanistan, once borders were eventually drawn up, Chamberlain was cantering down the Khyber Pass with a fellow officer, John Nicholson, when they came across corpses. Among them was that of Nicholson's brother, naked and hacked to pieces, his genitals severed and stuffed in his mouth.

Of Dalrymple's recent works, Return of a King is perhaps the most directly relevant to the present day. The author spent time in both Afghanistan and Pakistan during its research and elaborates on the obvious parallels with the current situation, as western forces prepare their own ignominious exit from Afghanistan. From the vain, ill-informed, militaristic civilian commander-in-chief surrounded by hawkish advisers impatient of the warnings given by better-informed men on the ground to the catalogue of errors – military, political, logistic – made once the invasion is under way, these are striking.


413ERprUUYL