WEFOUNDBram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis, and the Gothic


Many of the events of Bram Stoker's life are still a mystery and are open to speculation. Most biographers have had to rely on public records to determine the interests and life of the author, thus prompting Daniel Farson, Stoker's grandnephew and also one of his biographers, to write: "Stoker has long remained one of the least known authors of one of the best-known books ever written."

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

Many of the events of Bram Stoker's life are still a mystery and are open to speculation. Most biographers have had to rely on public records to determine the interests and life of the author, thus prompting Daniel Farson, Stoker's grandnephew and also one of his biographers, to write: "Stoker has long remained one of the least known authors of one of the best-known books ever written."

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

There I stood, pressed against the glass floor to ceiling window at the top of the Guinness Storehouse. I was totally zoning out, trying to drown the crowd behind me with the “dark stuff” and a remarkable view of Dublin. I peered off into the night sky, blanketed by brown clouds that seemed just low enough to soften the city. My eyes scanned the shadows tracing down streets, around corners and puddles that bounced sparkling reflections of light. I was determined to see something -unusual. Something like a vampire. Something like Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

The legendary Victorian vamp has transcended decades and made his way into pop culture media -adored by the masses. Now more than ever, vampire enthusiasts are tuning in and turning pages to popular bloodletting, romanticized-Goth, action-packed vampire novels. I’d be willing to bet that most adults know who Dracula is, and every neck-biting fan knows who Bram Stoker is. That said, did you know he was a Dubliner? True story!

The Bram Stoker Family Home –  15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf Dublin 3 – This was the family home of the Stokers. This is a cool link to it. It actually went up for sale last year. His Dublin City Home –  30 Kildare Street, Dublin

Many of the events of Bram Stoker's life are still a mystery and are open to speculation. Most biographers have had to rely on public records to determine the interests and life of the author, thus prompting Daniel Farson, Stoker's grandnephew and also one of his biographers, to write: "Stoker has long remained one of the least known authors of one of the best-known books ever written."

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

There I stood, pressed against the glass floor to ceiling window at the top of the Guinness Storehouse. I was totally zoning out, trying to drown the crowd behind me with the “dark stuff” and a remarkable view of Dublin. I peered off into the night sky, blanketed by brown clouds that seemed just low enough to soften the city. My eyes scanned the shadows tracing down streets, around corners and puddles that bounced sparkling reflections of light. I was determined to see something -unusual. Something like a vampire. Something like Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

The legendary Victorian vamp has transcended decades and made his way into pop culture media -adored by the masses. Now more than ever, vampire enthusiasts are tuning in and turning pages to popular bloodletting, romanticized-Goth, action-packed vampire novels. I’d be willing to bet that most adults know who Dracula is, and every neck-biting fan knows who Bram Stoker is. That said, did you know he was a Dubliner? True story!

The Bram Stoker Family Home –  15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf Dublin 3 – This was the family home of the Stokers. This is a cool link to it. It actually went up for sale last year. His Dublin City Home –  30 Kildare Street, Dublin

Eventbrite, and certain approved third parties, use functional, analytical and tracking cookies (or similar technologies) to understand your event preferences and provide you with a customised experience. By closing this banner or by continuing to use Eventbrite, you agree. For more information please review our cookie policy .

Join us to view the figure of the vampire through the looking glass of the victorian age with Dr Sam George, convenor of the Open Graves, Open Minds research project (University of Hertfordshire).

Why don’t vampires cast reflections? Who invited vampires into the UK academy? This paper will seek to answer such questions whilst introducing audiences to the Open, Graves, Open Minds project.

Bram Stoker , byname of Abraham Stoker , (born Nov. 8, 1847, Clontarf, County Dublin , Ire.—died April 20, 1912, London , Eng.), Irish writer best known as the author of the Gothic horror tale Dracula .

Two years after Stoker’s death, his widow, Florence Stoker, published as part of a posthumous collection of short stories Dracula’s Guest , which, most contemporary scholars believe, text editors had excised from the original Dracula manuscript. In 2009 Dacre Stoker (great grandnephew of the author) and Ian Holt produced Dracula: The Un-Dead , a sequel that is based on the novelist’s own notes and excisions from the original. The sequel, which shuns the epistolary style of the first Dracula for traditional third-person narrative, is a thriller set in London in 1912, and it features Bram Stoker as a character.

Stoker wrote several other novels—among them The Mystery of the Sea (1902), The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903), and The Lady of the Shroud (1909)—but none of them approached the popularity or, indeed, the quality of Dracula .

Many of the events of Bram Stoker's life are still a mystery and are open to speculation. Most biographers have had to rely on public records to determine the interests and life of the author, thus prompting Daniel Farson, Stoker's grandnephew and also one of his biographers, to write: "Stoker has long remained one of the least known authors of one of the best-known books ever written."

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

There I stood, pressed against the glass floor to ceiling window at the top of the Guinness Storehouse. I was totally zoning out, trying to drown the crowd behind me with the “dark stuff” and a remarkable view of Dublin. I peered off into the night sky, blanketed by brown clouds that seemed just low enough to soften the city. My eyes scanned the shadows tracing down streets, around corners and puddles that bounced sparkling reflections of light. I was determined to see something -unusual. Something like a vampire. Something like Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

The legendary Victorian vamp has transcended decades and made his way into pop culture media -adored by the masses. Now more than ever, vampire enthusiasts are tuning in and turning pages to popular bloodletting, romanticized-Goth, action-packed vampire novels. I’d be willing to bet that most adults know who Dracula is, and every neck-biting fan knows who Bram Stoker is. That said, did you know he was a Dubliner? True story!

The Bram Stoker Family Home –  15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf Dublin 3 – This was the family home of the Stokers. This is a cool link to it. It actually went up for sale last year. His Dublin City Home –  30 Kildare Street, Dublin

Eventbrite, and certain approved third parties, use functional, analytical and tracking cookies (or similar technologies) to understand your event preferences and provide you with a customised experience. By closing this banner or by continuing to use Eventbrite, you agree. For more information please review our cookie policy .

Join us to view the figure of the vampire through the looking glass of the victorian age with Dr Sam George, convenor of the Open Graves, Open Minds research project (University of Hertfordshire).

Why don’t vampires cast reflections? Who invited vampires into the UK academy? This paper will seek to answer such questions whilst introducing audiences to the Open, Graves, Open Minds project.

Bram Stoker , byname of Abraham Stoker , (born Nov. 8, 1847, Clontarf, County Dublin , Ire.—died April 20, 1912, London , Eng.), Irish writer best known as the author of the Gothic horror tale Dracula .

Two years after Stoker’s death, his widow, Florence Stoker, published as part of a posthumous collection of short stories Dracula’s Guest , which, most contemporary scholars believe, text editors had excised from the original Dracula manuscript. In 2009 Dacre Stoker (great grandnephew of the author) and Ian Holt produced Dracula: The Un-Dead , a sequel that is based on the novelist’s own notes and excisions from the original. The sequel, which shuns the epistolary style of the first Dracula for traditional third-person narrative, is a thriller set in London in 1912, and it features Bram Stoker as a character.

Stoker wrote several other novels—among them The Mystery of the Sea (1902), The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903), and The Lady of the Shroud (1909)—but none of them approached the popularity or, indeed, the quality of Dracula .

Born: November 8, 1847
Clontarf, Ireland
Died: April 20, 1912
London, England
Irish writer

Bram Stoker is best known as the author of Dracula (1897), one of the most famous horror novels of all time.

Abraham Stoker was born in Clontarf, Ireland, on November 8, 1847. He was a sickly child, bedridden for much of his boyhood until about the age of seven. As a youth, Stoker was intrigued by the stories told him by his mother, Charlotte. Especially influential to the mind of young Stoker were the stories she related about the cholera epidemic of 1832 which claimed thousands of lives. These cruel and vivid tales began to shape the young Stoker's imagination.

Many of the events of Bram Stoker's life are still a mystery and are open to speculation. Most biographers have had to rely on public records to determine the interests and life of the author, thus prompting Daniel Farson, Stoker's grandnephew and also one of his biographers, to write: "Stoker has long remained one of the least known authors of one of the best-known books ever written."

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

There I stood, pressed against the glass floor to ceiling window at the top of the Guinness Storehouse. I was totally zoning out, trying to drown the crowd behind me with the “dark stuff” and a remarkable view of Dublin. I peered off into the night sky, blanketed by brown clouds that seemed just low enough to soften the city. My eyes scanned the shadows tracing down streets, around corners and puddles that bounced sparkling reflections of light. I was determined to see something -unusual. Something like a vampire. Something like Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

The legendary Victorian vamp has transcended decades and made his way into pop culture media -adored by the masses. Now more than ever, vampire enthusiasts are tuning in and turning pages to popular bloodletting, romanticized-Goth, action-packed vampire novels. I’d be willing to bet that most adults know who Dracula is, and every neck-biting fan knows who Bram Stoker is. That said, did you know he was a Dubliner? True story!

The Bram Stoker Family Home –  15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf Dublin 3 – This was the family home of the Stokers. This is a cool link to it. It actually went up for sale last year. His Dublin City Home –  30 Kildare Street, Dublin

Eventbrite, and certain approved third parties, use functional, analytical and tracking cookies (or similar technologies) to understand your event preferences and provide you with a customised experience. By closing this banner or by continuing to use Eventbrite, you agree. For more information please review our cookie policy .

Join us to view the figure of the vampire through the looking glass of the victorian age with Dr Sam George, convenor of the Open Graves, Open Minds research project (University of Hertfordshire).

Why don’t vampires cast reflections? Who invited vampires into the UK academy? This paper will seek to answer such questions whilst introducing audiences to the Open, Graves, Open Minds project.

Many of the events of Bram Stoker's life are still a mystery and are open to speculation. Most biographers have had to rely on public records to determine the interests and life of the author, thus prompting Daniel Farson, Stoker's grandnephew and also one of his biographers, to write: "Stoker has long remained one of the least known authors of one of the best-known books ever written."

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

There I stood, pressed against the glass floor to ceiling window at the top of the Guinness Storehouse. I was totally zoning out, trying to drown the crowd behind me with the “dark stuff” and a remarkable view of Dublin. I peered off into the night sky, blanketed by brown clouds that seemed just low enough to soften the city. My eyes scanned the shadows tracing down streets, around corners and puddles that bounced sparkling reflections of light. I was determined to see something -unusual. Something like a vampire. Something like Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

The legendary Victorian vamp has transcended decades and made his way into pop culture media -adored by the masses. Now more than ever, vampire enthusiasts are tuning in and turning pages to popular bloodletting, romanticized-Goth, action-packed vampire novels. I’d be willing to bet that most adults know who Dracula is, and every neck-biting fan knows who Bram Stoker is. That said, did you know he was a Dubliner? True story!

The Bram Stoker Family Home –  15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf Dublin 3 – This was the family home of the Stokers. This is a cool link to it. It actually went up for sale last year. His Dublin City Home –  30 Kildare Street, Dublin

Eventbrite, and certain approved third parties, use functional, analytical and tracking cookies (or similar technologies) to understand your event preferences and provide you with a customised experience. By closing this banner or by continuing to use Eventbrite, you agree. For more information please review our cookie policy .

Join us to view the figure of the vampire through the looking glass of the victorian age with Dr Sam George, convenor of the Open Graves, Open Minds research project (University of Hertfordshire).

Why don’t vampires cast reflections? Who invited vampires into the UK academy? This paper will seek to answer such questions whilst introducing audiences to the Open, Graves, Open Minds project.

Bram Stoker , byname of Abraham Stoker , (born Nov. 8, 1847, Clontarf, County Dublin , Ire.—died April 20, 1912, London , Eng.), Irish writer best known as the author of the Gothic horror tale Dracula .

Two years after Stoker’s death, his widow, Florence Stoker, published as part of a posthumous collection of short stories Dracula’s Guest , which, most contemporary scholars believe, text editors had excised from the original Dracula manuscript. In 2009 Dacre Stoker (great grandnephew of the author) and Ian Holt produced Dracula: The Un-Dead , a sequel that is based on the novelist’s own notes and excisions from the original. The sequel, which shuns the epistolary style of the first Dracula for traditional third-person narrative, is a thriller set in London in 1912, and it features Bram Stoker as a character.

Stoker wrote several other novels—among them The Mystery of the Sea (1902), The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903), and The Lady of the Shroud (1909)—but none of them approached the popularity or, indeed, the quality of Dracula .

Born: November 8, 1847
Clontarf, Ireland
Died: April 20, 1912
London, England
Irish writer

Bram Stoker is best known as the author of Dracula (1897), one of the most famous horror novels of all time.

Abraham Stoker was born in Clontarf, Ireland, on November 8, 1847. He was a sickly child, bedridden for much of his boyhood until about the age of seven. As a youth, Stoker was intrigued by the stories told him by his mother, Charlotte. Especially influential to the mind of young Stoker were the stories she related about the cholera epidemic of 1832 which claimed thousands of lives. These cruel and vivid tales began to shape the young Stoker's imagination.

Some say that Transylvania sits on one of Earth's strongest magnetic fields and its people have extra-sensory perception. Vampires are believed to hang around crossroads on St. George's Day, April 23, and the eve of St. Andrew, November 29. The area is also home to Bram Stoker's Dracula, and it's easy to get caught up in the tale while driving along winding roads through dense, dark, ancient forests and over mountain passes.

Tales of the supernatural had been circulating in Romanian folklore for centuries when Irish writer Bram Stoker picked up the thread and spun it into a golden tale of ghoulishness that has never been out of print since its first publication in 1897. To research his immortal tale, Stoker immersed himself in the history, lore and legends of Transylvania, which he called a "whirlpool for the imagination."

Count Dracula, a fictional character in the Dracula novel, was inspired by one of the best-known figures of Romanian history, Vlad Dracula, nicknamed Vlad Tepes (Vlad the Impaler), who was the ruler of Walachia at various times from 1456-1462. Born in 1431 in Sighisoara, he resided all his adult life in Walachia, except for periods of imprisonment at Pest and Visegrad (in Hungary). For more information about Bram Stocker's Dracula Novel please visit www.literature.org/authors/stoker-bram/dracula/


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