WEFOUNDThe Custom-House of Desire: A Half Century of Surrealist Stories


The Custom House , on the north bank of the Thames in the City of London was formerly in use for the collection of customs duties . It was in use for many centuries and rebuilt on a number of occasions.

The site was long known as "Wool Quay", and, from the medieval period, a custom house was necessary there to levy the duty payable on exported wool. Such a building is recorded as early as 1377. The quay and the buildings on it were privately owned. Around 1380, one John Churchman built a custom house there to collect dues for the City of London, and in 1382 the Crown came to an agreement to use its facilities.

Churchman’s custom house remained in use until 1559, the freehold passing through various hands. Its replacement was erected under the direction of William Paulet , Marquess of Winchester, the Lord High Treasurer. A print from 1663 shows it as a three-storey building, with octagonal staircase towers. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.

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I think Hawthorne does this to prove he has gone to great lengths to research for his writing before he put it in context. He hopes to validate and give credibility to the expertise he has in creating a historical novel for we the readers.

The Custom House he spent time in had stacks and stacks of old papers and records. One item he found in particular gave him great motivation for the book:

I think Hawthorne does this to prove he has gone to great lengths to research for his writing before he put it in context. He hopes to validate and give credibility to the expertise he has in creating a historical novel for we the readers.

The Custom House , on the north bank of the Thames in the City of London was formerly in use for the collection of customs duties . It was in use for many centuries and rebuilt on a number of occasions.

The site was long known as "Wool Quay", and, from the medieval period, a custom house was necessary there to levy the duty payable on exported wool. Such a building is recorded as early as 1377. The quay and the buildings on it were privately owned. Around 1380, one John Churchman built a custom house there to collect dues for the City of London, and in 1382 the Crown came to an agreement to use its facilities.

Churchman’s custom house remained in use until 1559, the freehold passing through various hands. Its replacement was erected under the direction of William Paulet , Marquess of Winchester, the Lord High Treasurer. A print from 1663 shows it as a three-storey building, with octagonal staircase towers. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.

The Custom House , on the north bank of the Thames in the City of London was formerly in use for the collection of customs duties . It was in use for many centuries and rebuilt on a number of occasions.

The site was long known as "Wool Quay", and, from the medieval period, a custom house was necessary there to levy the duty payable on exported wool. Such a building is recorded as early as 1377. The quay and the buildings on it were privately owned. Around 1380, one John Churchman built a custom house there to collect dues for the City of London, and in 1382 the Crown came to an agreement to use its facilities.

Churchman’s custom house remained in use until 1559, the freehold passing through various hands. Its replacement was erected under the direction of William Paulet , Marquess of Winchester, the Lord High Treasurer. A print from 1663 shows it as a three-storey building, with octagonal staircase towers. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.

© 2018 Seamless North America, LLC. All Rights Reserved • Terms of Use • Privacy Policy


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