WEFOUNDMar sin companion (Irish Edition)


We find, then, two independent bodies with a very direct interest in getting rid of Collins, viz, the junta within the cabinet and the British secret service.
                                                   – John M Feehan

This blogger is a great fan of TG4’s Irish history documentaries: a type of production in which they are rarely excelled.

At the news of their new documentary on Ernest Blythe, (of the WT Cosgrave government ca 1922) this writer looked forward to TG4’s usual high standard of even-handed, circumspect historical chronicling.

This is another really stupid Cassidy suggestion. He claims that the word nincompoop comes from the Irish naioidhean ar chuma búb, which he says is pronounced neeyan [er] um boob and (again, according to him) means “a baby in the shape of a blubbering boob.”

Let’s examine this claim carefully. Firstly, does the ‘Irish’ phrase sound like nincompoop? Not much. Is there any evidence of anyone ever using this expression before Cassidy? No, of course there isn’t. Is it likely that anyone would use it? Think about it. Insults need to be clever or punchy. They need to be effective as ways of putting someone in their place, which is why you very rarely find people saying things like “He is a man who seems to have the appearance of a dolt.” If you want to insult someone, you simply call them a dolt. Because of this, the chances of Cassidy’s claim being correct are vanishingly slight.

Although we don’t have any solid evidence about the real origin of nincompoop, there is nothing to suggest that it comes from Irish. It is first found in English in the 1670s. Some dictionaries conjecture that it probably comes from the phrase non compos mentis (a legal formula meaning not of sound mind). Others dispute this. But Cassidy’s ridiculous suggestion is just another confirmation that he was far from compos mentis himself.

We find, then, two independent bodies with a very direct interest in getting rid of Collins, viz, the junta within the cabinet and the British secret service.
                                                   – John M Feehan

This blogger is a great fan of TG4’s Irish history documentaries: a type of production in which they are rarely excelled.

At the news of their new documentary on Ernest Blythe, (of the WT Cosgrave government ca 1922) this writer looked forward to TG4’s usual high standard of even-handed, circumspect historical chronicling.

This is another really stupid Cassidy suggestion. He claims that the word nincompoop comes from the Irish naioidhean ar chuma búb, which he says is pronounced neeyan [er] um boob and (again, according to him) means “a baby in the shape of a blubbering boob.”

Let’s examine this claim carefully. Firstly, does the ‘Irish’ phrase sound like nincompoop? Not much. Is there any evidence of anyone ever using this expression before Cassidy? No, of course there isn’t. Is it likely that anyone would use it? Think about it. Insults need to be clever or punchy. They need to be effective as ways of putting someone in their place, which is why you very rarely find people saying things like “He is a man who seems to have the appearance of a dolt.” If you want to insult someone, you simply call them a dolt. Because of this, the chances of Cassidy’s claim being correct are vanishingly slight.

Although we don’t have any solid evidence about the real origin of nincompoop, there is nothing to suggest that it comes from Irish. It is first found in English in the 1670s. Some dictionaries conjecture that it probably comes from the phrase non compos mentis (a legal formula meaning not of sound mind). Others dispute this. But Cassidy’s ridiculous suggestion is just another confirmation that he was far from compos mentis himself.

12.10.2017  · Mar sin companion (Irish Edition) - Kindle edition by Emma Clancy. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features ...

companion - translation to Irish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic audio ... is mór an spórt í mar chomrádaí ... he makes a great companion agus lena chois sin , ...

**Please note that the abc’ s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc ... BIOD SE MAR SIN ... Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No ...

A history of Ireland in our favourite words: 22 – leprechaun. Their place in Irish folklore was solidified by the 1959 Disney film Darby O’Gill and the Little People

An Béal Bocht , the novel that Brian O’Nolan published in 1941 as Myles na gCopaleen, parodied the miserylit of Peig and An t-Oileánach , but “to put on the poor mouth” was an expression before na gCopaleen also parodied the title of An Béal Beo , Tomás Ó Máille’s 1936 collection of Irish words and phrases.

We find, then, two independent bodies with a very direct interest in getting rid of Collins, viz, the junta within the cabinet and the British secret service.
                                                   – John M Feehan

This blogger is a great fan of TG4’s Irish history documentaries: a type of production in which they are rarely excelled.

At the news of their new documentary on Ernest Blythe, (of the WT Cosgrave government ca 1922) this writer looked forward to TG4’s usual high standard of even-handed, circumspect historical chronicling.

This is another really stupid Cassidy suggestion. He claims that the word nincompoop comes from the Irish naioidhean ar chuma búb, which he says is pronounced neeyan [er] um boob and (again, according to him) means “a baby in the shape of a blubbering boob.”

Let’s examine this claim carefully. Firstly, does the ‘Irish’ phrase sound like nincompoop? Not much. Is there any evidence of anyone ever using this expression before Cassidy? No, of course there isn’t. Is it likely that anyone would use it? Think about it. Insults need to be clever or punchy. They need to be effective as ways of putting someone in their place, which is why you very rarely find people saying things like “He is a man who seems to have the appearance of a dolt.” If you want to insult someone, you simply call them a dolt. Because of this, the chances of Cassidy’s claim being correct are vanishingly slight.

Although we don’t have any solid evidence about the real origin of nincompoop, there is nothing to suggest that it comes from Irish. It is first found in English in the 1670s. Some dictionaries conjecture that it probably comes from the phrase non compos mentis (a legal formula meaning not of sound mind). Others dispute this. But Cassidy’s ridiculous suggestion is just another confirmation that he was far from compos mentis himself.

12.10.2017  · Mar sin companion (Irish Edition) - Kindle edition by Emma Clancy. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features ...

companion - translation to Irish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic audio ... is mór an spórt í mar chomrádaí ... he makes a great companion agus lena chois sin , ...

**Please note that the abc’ s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc ... BIOD SE MAR SIN ... Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No ...

A history of Ireland in our favourite words: 22 – leprechaun. Their place in Irish folklore was solidified by the 1959 Disney film Darby O’Gill and the Little People

An Béal Bocht , the novel that Brian O’Nolan published in 1941 as Myles na gCopaleen, parodied the miserylit of Peig and An t-Oileánach , but “to put on the poor mouth” was an expression before na gCopaleen also parodied the title of An Béal Beo , Tomás Ó Máille’s 1936 collection of Irish words and phrases.

A number of historians and biographers have reiterated the erroneous contention that the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 was signed in response to threats of extraordinary military action by the British.

However, this was roundly refuted by Michael Collins himself; who, excepting only Arthur Griffith, certainly carried the lion’s share of work, responsibility, and decision-making in those negotiations.

Others’ writings about Collins often seem to be more readily before the public these days, than the unquestionably more valuable writings of the man himself.

We find, then, two independent bodies with a very direct interest in getting rid of Collins, viz, the junta within the cabinet and the British secret service.
                                                   – John M Feehan

This blogger is a great fan of TG4’s Irish history documentaries: a type of production in which they are rarely excelled.

At the news of their new documentary on Ernest Blythe, (of the WT Cosgrave government ca 1922) this writer looked forward to TG4’s usual high standard of even-handed, circumspect historical chronicling.

This is another really stupid Cassidy suggestion. He claims that the word nincompoop comes from the Irish naioidhean ar chuma búb, which he says is pronounced neeyan [er] um boob and (again, according to him) means “a baby in the shape of a blubbering boob.”

Let’s examine this claim carefully. Firstly, does the ‘Irish’ phrase sound like nincompoop? Not much. Is there any evidence of anyone ever using this expression before Cassidy? No, of course there isn’t. Is it likely that anyone would use it? Think about it. Insults need to be clever or punchy. They need to be effective as ways of putting someone in their place, which is why you very rarely find people saying things like “He is a man who seems to have the appearance of a dolt.” If you want to insult someone, you simply call them a dolt. Because of this, the chances of Cassidy’s claim being correct are vanishingly slight.

Although we don’t have any solid evidence about the real origin of nincompoop, there is nothing to suggest that it comes from Irish. It is first found in English in the 1670s. Some dictionaries conjecture that it probably comes from the phrase non compos mentis (a legal formula meaning not of sound mind). Others dispute this. But Cassidy’s ridiculous suggestion is just another confirmation that he was far from compos mentis himself.

12.10.2017  · Mar sin companion (Irish Edition) - Kindle edition by Emma Clancy. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features ...

companion - translation to Irish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic audio ... is mór an spórt í mar chomrádaí ... he makes a great companion agus lena chois sin , ...

**Please note that the abc’ s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc ... BIOD SE MAR SIN ... Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No ...

We find, then, two independent bodies with a very direct interest in getting rid of Collins, viz, the junta within the cabinet and the British secret service.
                                                   – John M Feehan

This blogger is a great fan of TG4’s Irish history documentaries: a type of production in which they are rarely excelled.

At the news of their new documentary on Ernest Blythe, (of the WT Cosgrave government ca 1922) this writer looked forward to TG4’s usual high standard of even-handed, circumspect historical chronicling.

This is another really stupid Cassidy suggestion. He claims that the word nincompoop comes from the Irish naioidhean ar chuma búb, which he says is pronounced neeyan [er] um boob and (again, according to him) means “a baby in the shape of a blubbering boob.”

Let’s examine this claim carefully. Firstly, does the ‘Irish’ phrase sound like nincompoop? Not much. Is there any evidence of anyone ever using this expression before Cassidy? No, of course there isn’t. Is it likely that anyone would use it? Think about it. Insults need to be clever or punchy. They need to be effective as ways of putting someone in their place, which is why you very rarely find people saying things like “He is a man who seems to have the appearance of a dolt.” If you want to insult someone, you simply call them a dolt. Because of this, the chances of Cassidy’s claim being correct are vanishingly slight.

Although we don’t have any solid evidence about the real origin of nincompoop, there is nothing to suggest that it comes from Irish. It is first found in English in the 1670s. Some dictionaries conjecture that it probably comes from the phrase non compos mentis (a legal formula meaning not of sound mind). Others dispute this. But Cassidy’s ridiculous suggestion is just another confirmation that he was far from compos mentis himself.

12.10.2017  · Mar sin companion (Irish Edition) - Kindle edition by Emma Clancy. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features ...

companion - translation to Irish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic audio ... is mór an spórt í mar chomrádaí ... he makes a great companion agus lena chois sin , ...

**Please note that the abc’ s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc ... BIOD SE MAR SIN ... Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No ...

A history of Ireland in our favourite words: 22 – leprechaun. Their place in Irish folklore was solidified by the 1959 Disney film Darby O’Gill and the Little People

An Béal Bocht , the novel that Brian O’Nolan published in 1941 as Myles na gCopaleen, parodied the miserylit of Peig and An t-Oileánach , but “to put on the poor mouth” was an expression before na gCopaleen also parodied the title of An Béal Beo , Tomás Ó Máille’s 1936 collection of Irish words and phrases.

A number of historians and biographers have reiterated the erroneous contention that the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 was signed in response to threats of extraordinary military action by the British.

However, this was roundly refuted by Michael Collins himself; who, excepting only Arthur Griffith, certainly carried the lion’s share of work, responsibility, and decision-making in those negotiations.

Others’ writings about Collins often seem to be more readily before the public these days, than the unquestionably more valuable writings of the man himself.

If the final few lines of the book are anything to go by, I am glad to have become aware of this book and this man so few have heard about. These people were the true native Irish and had traditions, lives and language etc. that would perhaps seem as foreign to us modern Irish today as French or Japanese.

i’m afraid aonghus i’m only rediscovering an interest in irish now, fifteen years after leaving school …

i took a day-long irish language course here in minnesota a year or so ago. obviously not trying to learn the language in a day, but my hope was to learn enough basics of pronunciation so that when i encountered written gaelic i could at least sort of pronounce it my head as i scrambled for a dictionary.

We find, then, two independent bodies with a very direct interest in getting rid of Collins, viz, the junta within the cabinet and the British secret service.
                                                   – John M Feehan

This blogger is a great fan of TG4’s Irish history documentaries: a type of production in which they are rarely excelled.

At the news of their new documentary on Ernest Blythe, (of the WT Cosgrave government ca 1922) this writer looked forward to TG4’s usual high standard of even-handed, circumspect historical chronicling.


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