WEFOUNDA Sermon, Preached May 15, 1821, at the Interment of Mrs. Elizabeth Lathrop, Relict of the Rev. Joseph Lathrop (Classic Reprint)


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" Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God " is a sermon written by British Colonial Christian theologian Jonathan Edwards , preached to his own congregation in Northampton, Massachusetts to unknown effect, [1] and again on July 8, 1741 in Enfield, Connecticut . [2] Like Edwards' other works, it combines vivid imagery of Hell with observations of the world and citations of the scripture . It is Edwards' most famous written work, is a fitting representation of his preaching style, [3] and is widely studied by Christians and historians, providing a glimpse into the theology of the Great Awakening of c. 1730–1755.

This is a typical sermon of the Great Awakening, emphasizing the belief that Hell is a real place. Edwards hoped that the imagery and language of his sermon would awaken audiences to the horrific reality that he believed awaited them should they continue life without devotion to Christ. [4] The underlying point is that God has given humanity a chance to rectify their sins. Edwards says that it is the will of God that keeps wicked men from the depths of Hell. This act of restraint has given humanity a chance to mend their ways and return to Christ. [5]

One church in Enfield, Connecticut, had been largely unaffected during the Great Awakening of New England. Edwards was invited by the pastor of the church to preach to them. Edwards's aim was to teach his listeners about the horrors of hell, the dangers of sin and the terrors of being lost. Edwards described the shaky position of those who do not follow Christ's urgent call to receive forgiveness.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

" Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God " is a sermon written by British Colonial Christian theologian Jonathan Edwards , preached to his own congregation in Northampton, Massachusetts to unknown effect, [1] and again on July 8, 1741 in Enfield, Connecticut . [2] Like Edwards' other works, it combines vivid imagery of Hell with observations of the world and citations of the scripture . It is Edwards' most famous written work, is a fitting representation of his preaching style, [3] and is widely studied by Christians and historians, providing a glimpse into the theology of the Great Awakening of c. 1730–1755.

This is a typical sermon of the Great Awakening, emphasizing the belief that Hell is a real place. Edwards hoped that the imagery and language of his sermon would awaken audiences to the horrific reality that he believed awaited them should they continue life without devotion to Christ. [4] The underlying point is that God has given humanity a chance to rectify their sins. Edwards says that it is the will of God that keeps wicked men from the depths of Hell. This act of restraint has given humanity a chance to mend their ways and return to Christ. [5]

One church in Enfield, Connecticut, had been largely unaffected during the Great Awakening of New England. Edwards was invited by the pastor of the church to preach to them. Edwards's aim was to teach his listeners about the horrors of hell, the dangers of sin and the terrors of being lost. Edwards described the shaky position of those who do not follow Christ's urgent call to receive forgiveness.

Related Topics: Ecclesiology (The Church) Glenn C. Tompkins Dr. Tompkins went to New York City  in  September 1947 to try to break into show business as a magician.He found work in an office in New York, but while he did some shows, never made it big as a magician. It was while he was living in NY that for the first time in his life, he heard ... More

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

" Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God " is a sermon written by British Colonial Christian theologian Jonathan Edwards , preached to his own congregation in Northampton, Massachusetts to unknown effect, [1] and again on July 8, 1741 in Enfield, Connecticut . [2] Like Edwards' other works, it combines vivid imagery of Hell with observations of the world and citations of the scripture . It is Edwards' most famous written work, is a fitting representation of his preaching style, [3] and is widely studied by Christians and historians, providing a glimpse into the theology of the Great Awakening of c. 1730–1755.

This is a typical sermon of the Great Awakening, emphasizing the belief that Hell is a real place. Edwards hoped that the imagery and language of his sermon would awaken audiences to the horrific reality that he believed awaited them should they continue life without devotion to Christ. [4] The underlying point is that God has given humanity a chance to rectify their sins. Edwards says that it is the will of God that keeps wicked men from the depths of Hell. This act of restraint has given humanity a chance to mend their ways and return to Christ. [5]

One church in Enfield, Connecticut, had been largely unaffected during the Great Awakening of New England. Edwards was invited by the pastor of the church to preach to them. Edwards's aim was to teach his listeners about the horrors of hell, the dangers of sin and the terrors of being lost. Edwards described the shaky position of those who do not follow Christ's urgent call to receive forgiveness.

Related Topics: Ecclesiology (The Church) Glenn C. Tompkins Dr. Tompkins went to New York City  in  September 1947 to try to break into show business as a magician.He found work in an office in New York, but while he did some shows, never made it big as a magician. It was while he was living in NY that for the first time in his life, he heard ... More

Put you hand, Thomas,
on the crawling head of a child
imprisoned in a cot in Romania.
Place your finger, Thomas,
on the list of those
who have disappeared in Chile.
Stroke the cheek, Thomas,
of the little girl
sold into prostitution in Thailand.
Touch, Thomas,
the gaping wounds of my world.
Feel, Thomas,
the primal wound of my people.
Reach out your hands, Thomas,
and place them at the side of the poor.
Grasp my hand, Thomas,
and believe,
when you feel me in the world’s pain
and in the world’s glory.

As you say the Church of England was at it’s finest on Royal Wedding day – the cartwheeling verger might have been thought irreverent by some people but it did show that those of us who attend church don’t sit through the service with long faces but that the services are enjoyable. Incidentally I have read that the organist, the chief organ scholar and the choirmaster at Westminster Cathedral are all members of the Catholic church so it is nice to see that the various Christian denominations are working together.


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