WEFOUNDLearning to Rhyme - A Montessori Pre-Language Exercise


Rhymes are a valuable way to introduce the sounds of a language and practise speaking in a fun and motivational way. Read this article to find out more about using rhymes at home with your children.

Simple rhymes are thought to be innate in most cultures. From the time young children begin to talk, many enjoy playing and experimenting with sounds by themselves – a precursor to later enjoyment of rhymes. Most seem to have skills and a built-in drive that enable them to imitate the sounds and pick up the language and special rhythms of rhymes.

Picking up and repeating the particular language of rhymes is another form of play for young children. They learn rhymes unconsciously and effortlessly; it is not the laborious task it can be for some adults.

Learning to identify rhymes is a fundamental phonemic awareness skill for young children.  Not only does your child need to listen carefully to each word but he needs to listen for sounds in specific positions in words. To identify a set of rhyming words, your child will need to listen for sounds in the ending position of each word. 

When a child can identify rhymes, it is evident he is able to isolate sounds in words. This will be important as your child learns to write, as writing involves your child first hearing the word he wants to write, then isolating individual sounds within the word, then applying letter(s) to each sound he hears.

The beginning rhyming worksheets are an excellent way to introduce your child to the concept of rhyming.  With four pictures on the page, your young child can consider a limited number of options while he practices.  Just be sure to to glance quickly at all of the pictures to make sure that you know what to call each one. For example, if the first picture is a bat, you would know to call the kitten a “cat” when labeling the pictures for your child.

Rhymes are a valuable way to introduce the sounds of a language and practise speaking in a fun and motivational way. Read this article to find out more about using rhymes at home with your children.

Simple rhymes are thought to be innate in most cultures. From the time young children begin to talk, many enjoy playing and experimenting with sounds by themselves – a precursor to later enjoyment of rhymes. Most seem to have skills and a built-in drive that enable them to imitate the sounds and pick up the language and special rhythms of rhymes.

Picking up and repeating the particular language of rhymes is another form of play for young children. They learn rhymes unconsciously and effortlessly; it is not the laborious task it can be for some adults.


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