WEFOUNDThe Book of Three (Charmed)


Deuteronomy is organized as a series of three discourses by Moses (1:6-4:40, chs. 5-28, chs. 29-30), with a concluding addendum (chs. 31-34), his final "words" given to the Hebrews as they prepare to enter the land of Canaan. These "words" recall the past activities of God in order to build identity for the present community. The people are then called to continued faithfulness in the future based on that communal identity.

This teaching dimension and the resulting theological linking of the community past, present, and future form the literary and theological dynamic of the entire book.

1. The first discourse (1:6-4:40) summarizes the events between the encounter with God at Sinai and the encampment in Moab, followed by an urgent appeal for faithfulness to God.

Fletcher and his friends fight for survival in the ether, where they pursue a mortally dangerous quest to rebuild their world and broker peace.

Even as hatred threatens to turn friend into foe in The Battlemage , Fletcher must lead a small army of soldiers into battle to protect his ancestral homeland, and face his biggest challenge yet: his nemesis, the albino orc, Khan, who seeks to destroy everything Fletcher holds dear.

Arcturus is just an orphaned stable boy when he accidentally summons a demon. As Hominum's first common summoner, he becomes the key to a secret that the powerful nobility would do anything to keep hidden.

Deuteronomy is organized as a series of three discourses by Moses (1:6-4:40, chs. 5-28, chs. 29-30), with a concluding addendum (chs. 31-34), his final "words" given to the Hebrews as they prepare to enter the land of Canaan. These "words" recall the past activities of God in order to build identity for the present community. The people are then called to continued faithfulness in the future based on that communal identity.

This teaching dimension and the resulting theological linking of the community past, present, and future form the literary and theological dynamic of the entire book.

1. The first discourse (1:6-4:40) summarizes the events between the encounter with God at Sinai and the encampment in Moab, followed by an urgent appeal for faithfulness to God.

Deuteronomy is organized as a series of three discourses by Moses (1:6-4:40, chs. 5-28, chs. 29-30), with a concluding addendum (chs. 31-34), his final "words" given to the Hebrews as they prepare to enter the land of Canaan. These "words" recall the past activities of God in order to build identity for the present community. The people are then called to continued faithfulness in the future based on that communal identity.

This teaching dimension and the resulting theological linking of the community past, present, and future form the literary and theological dynamic of the entire book.

1. The first discourse (1:6-4:40) summarizes the events between the encounter with God at Sinai and the encampment in Moab, followed by an urgent appeal for faithfulness to God.

Fletcher and his friends fight for survival in the ether, where they pursue a mortally dangerous quest to rebuild their world and broker peace.

Even as hatred threatens to turn friend into foe in The Battlemage , Fletcher must lead a small army of soldiers into battle to protect his ancestral homeland, and face his biggest challenge yet: his nemesis, the albino orc, Khan, who seeks to destroy everything Fletcher holds dear.

Arcturus is just an orphaned stable boy when he accidentally summons a demon. As Hominum's first common summoner, he becomes the key to a secret that the powerful nobility would do anything to keep hidden.

4  Then the herald loudly proclaimed, “Nations and peoples of every language, this is what you are commanded to do: 5  As soon as you hear the sound of the horn, flute, zither, lyre, harp, pipe and all kinds of music, you must fall down and worship the image of gold that King Nebuchadnezzar has set up. 6  Whoever does not fall down and worship will immediately be thrown into a blazing furnace.”

7  Therefore, as soon as they heard the sound of the horn, flute, zither, lyre, harp and all kinds of music, all the nations and peoples of every language fell down and worshiped the image of gold that King Nebuchadnezzar had set up.

8  At this time some astrologers [ b ] came forward and denounced the Jews. 9  They said to King Nebuchadnezzar, “May the king live forever! 10  Your Majesty has issued a decree that everyone who hears the sound of the horn, flute, zither, lyre, harp, pipe and all kinds of music must fall down and worship the image of gold, 11  and that whoever does not fall down and worship will be thrown into a blazing furnace. 12  But there are some Jews whom you have set over the affairs of the province of Babylon—Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego —who pay no attention to you, Your Majesty. They neither serve your gods nor worship the image of gold you have set up.”


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