WEFOUNDThe Remarkable Journey of Prince Jen


One of Hollywood's legendary leading men is the subject of a new book. Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot examines the life and career of the late actor so many women were infatuated with and men wished they could be. Even Cary Grant said he, too wished he "could be Cary Grant" a creation all his own that was a long journey from an impoverished, traumatic childhood in Bristol, England.

The tall, dark and classically handsome actor was the epitome of urbane sophistication. But what Cary Grant brought to the screen that made him Hollywood's favorite movie idol for nearly four decades was more than simple good looks. He could play leading man and comic foil, as he did with actress Katherine Hepburn in such groundbreaking 1930s comedies as "The Philadelphia Story and "Bringing up Baby."

Archie Leach assuaged his grief by hanging around the back-stages of Bristol music halls, and, at the age of fourteen dropped out of school to join an acrobatic troupe. There he learned to do back-flips and to walk on stilts, and he trained in the art of physical comedy. When the troupe was invited to perform in New York, he fell in love with the city and never returned to England. When the young performer first tried his hand at acting on Broadway, he flopped. Audiences didn't seem to care for his deep Bristol accent and working-class ways. What he needed, says Grant biographer Marc Eliot, was a touch of "refinement."

One of Hollywood's legendary leading men is the subject of a new book. Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot examines the life and career of the late actor so many women were infatuated with and men wished they could be. Even Cary Grant said he, too wished he "could be Cary Grant" a creation all his own that was a long journey from an impoverished, traumatic childhood in Bristol, England.

The tall, dark and classically handsome actor was the epitome of urbane sophistication. But what Cary Grant brought to the screen that made him Hollywood's favorite movie idol for nearly four decades was more than simple good looks. He could play leading man and comic foil, as he did with actress Katherine Hepburn in such groundbreaking 1930s comedies as "The Philadelphia Story and "Bringing up Baby."

Archie Leach assuaged his grief by hanging around the back-stages of Bristol music halls, and, at the age of fourteen dropped out of school to join an acrobatic troupe. There he learned to do back-flips and to walk on stilts, and he trained in the art of physical comedy. When the troupe was invited to perform in New York, he fell in love with the city and never returned to England. When the young performer first tried his hand at acting on Broadway, he flopped. Audiences didn't seem to care for his deep Bristol accent and working-class ways. What he needed, says Grant biographer Marc Eliot, was a touch of "refinement."

When love enters Tranby Quirke's life in the form of a beautiful 19-year-old student, Lysette McDonald, she embarks on the most remarkable journey of all.

London: 1909. Thirty-four-year-old spinster and secret suffragette Tranby Quirke spends her days toiling in obscurity as a lecturer to modern women and spends her nights embarking on exotic foreign adventures—but only inside her head. Then love enters Tranby's life in the most unexpected of ways and her real life adventures take her on a journey beyond imagining.

When Miss Lucia Foxe is robbed by a band of shadowy highwaymen, she does not realize this frightening event will change her life forever. Her brave quest to retrieve her stolen locket brings her into close contact with the thieves and their dashing and fearless masked leader, Len Hawkins. But there is more to Len than meets the eye. Beneath the robber's mask lies a woman who, in her heart, is not really so very different from Lucia.

As their unlikely love grows against the backdrop of the poverty and violent protest of Regency England, Lucia learns how much more there is to the world than her upbringing has taught her. Len flirts with death every day, and eventually, an attempt at exacting revenge on her cruel father threatens to snatch her from Lucia's arms.

The late scholar and author Dr. Henry Morris believed the biblical account of Jonah was true, and this book will thrill others who believe it, too. Drawing on a lengthy research career, Morris takes the reader on the same wonderful ride on which Jonah embarked. Sure to be a hit for Bible study groups and individuals who find inspiration from a beloved classic.

One of Hollywood's legendary leading men is the subject of a new book. Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot examines the life and career of the late actor so many women were infatuated with and men wished they could be. Even Cary Grant said he, too wished he "could be Cary Grant" a creation all his own that was a long journey from an impoverished, traumatic childhood in Bristol, England.

The tall, dark and classically handsome actor was the epitome of urbane sophistication. But what Cary Grant brought to the screen that made him Hollywood's favorite movie idol for nearly four decades was more than simple good looks. He could play leading man and comic foil, as he did with actress Katherine Hepburn in such groundbreaking 1930s comedies as "The Philadelphia Story and "Bringing up Baby."

Archie Leach assuaged his grief by hanging around the back-stages of Bristol music halls, and, at the age of fourteen dropped out of school to join an acrobatic troupe. There he learned to do back-flips and to walk on stilts, and he trained in the art of physical comedy. When the troupe was invited to perform in New York, he fell in love with the city and never returned to England. When the young performer first tried his hand at acting on Broadway, he flopped. Audiences didn't seem to care for his deep Bristol accent and working-class ways. What he needed, says Grant biographer Marc Eliot, was a touch of "refinement."

When love enters Tranby Quirke's life in the form of a beautiful 19-year-old student, Lysette McDonald, she embarks on the most remarkable journey of all.

London: 1909. Thirty-four-year-old spinster and secret suffragette Tranby Quirke spends her days toiling in obscurity as a lecturer to modern women and spends her nights embarking on exotic foreign adventures—but only inside her head. Then love enters Tranby's life in the most unexpected of ways and her real life adventures take her on a journey beyond imagining.

When Miss Lucia Foxe is robbed by a band of shadowy highwaymen, she does not realize this frightening event will change her life forever. Her brave quest to retrieve her stolen locket brings her into close contact with the thieves and their dashing and fearless masked leader, Len Hawkins. But there is more to Len than meets the eye. Beneath the robber's mask lies a woman who, in her heart, is not really so very different from Lucia.

As their unlikely love grows against the backdrop of the poverty and violent protest of Regency England, Lucia learns how much more there is to the world than her upbringing has taught her. Len flirts with death every day, and eventually, an attempt at exacting revenge on her cruel father threatens to snatch her from Lucia's arms.


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