WEFOUNDHans Bellmer: The Doll (Atlas Anti-Classics) (2013-03-31)


A German born artist and photographer, Hans Bellmar is considered as having a surrealist style in photography by historians of the two mentioned fields. Until 1926 that is at the age of 24, Bellmer worked at his personal advertising firm as a draftsman. The artist is known for his project on mutated body forms of dolls and their unusual poses; in order to combat the fascism being imposed on people by the Nazis. Bellmer’s influence was from Oskar Kokoschka’s letters published in print. Kokoschka was an Austrian poet and artist.

Once the war was over, Bellmer lived in Paris forever. He then quit making dolls and turned towards creating erotic etchings, drawings, paintings, pornographic photography and teenage girl prints.

On the other hand, in 2006, the London Whitechapel Gallery removed Hans Bellmar’s twelve photographs from an exhibition from fear of Muslim neighborhoods that they will be offended by the sexually explicit content.

A German born artist and photographer, Hans Bellmar is considered as having a surrealist style in photography by historians of the two mentioned fields. Until 1926 that is at the age of 24, Bellmer worked at his personal advertising firm as a draftsman. The artist is known for his project on mutated body forms of dolls and their unusual poses; in order to combat the fascism being imposed on people by the Nazis. Bellmer’s influence was from Oskar Kokoschka’s letters published in print. Kokoschka was an Austrian poet and artist.

Once the war was over, Bellmer lived in Paris forever. He then quit making dolls and turned towards creating erotic etchings, drawings, paintings, pornographic photography and teenage girl prints.

On the other hand, in 2006, the London Whitechapel Gallery removed Hans Bellmar’s twelve photographs from an exhibition from fear of Muslim neighborhoods that they will be offended by the sexually explicit content.

Hans Bellmer (13 March 1902 – 24 February 1975) was a German artist, best known for the life-sized pubescent female dolls he produced in the mid-1930s. Historians of art and photography also consider him a Surrealist photographer .

Bellmer was born in the city of Kattowitz , then part of the German Empire (now Katowice , Poland ). Up until 1926, he'd been working as a draftsman for his own advertising company. He initiated his doll project to oppose the fascism of the Nazi Party by declaring that he would make no work that would support the new German state. Represented by mutated forms and unconventional poses, his dolls were directed specifically at the cult of the perfect body then prominent in Germany. [1] Bellmer was influenced in his choice of art form by reading the published letters of Oskar Kokoschka ( Der Fetisch , 1925).

He visited Paris in 1935 and made contacts there, such as Paul Éluard , but returned to Berlin because his wife Margarete was dying of tuberculosis . [4]

A German born artist and photographer, Hans Bellmar is considered as having a surrealist style in photography by historians of the two mentioned fields. Until 1926 that is at the age of 24, Bellmer worked at his personal advertising firm as a draftsman. The artist is known for his project on mutated body forms of dolls and their unusual poses; in order to combat the fascism being imposed on people by the Nazis. Bellmer’s influence was from Oskar Kokoschka’s letters published in print. Kokoschka was an Austrian poet and artist.

Once the war was over, Bellmer lived in Paris forever. He then quit making dolls and turned towards creating erotic etchings, drawings, paintings, pornographic photography and teenage girl prints.

On the other hand, in 2006, the London Whitechapel Gallery removed Hans Bellmar’s twelve photographs from an exhibition from fear of Muslim neighborhoods that they will be offended by the sexually explicit content.

Hans Bellmer (13 March 1902 – 24 February 1975) was a German artist, best known for the life-sized pubescent female dolls he produced in the mid-1930s. Historians of art and photography also consider him a Surrealist photographer .

Bellmer was born in the city of Kattowitz , then part of the German Empire (now Katowice , Poland ). Up until 1926, he'd been working as a draftsman for his own advertising company. He initiated his doll project to oppose the fascism of the Nazi Party by declaring that he would make no work that would support the new German state. Represented by mutated forms and unconventional poses, his dolls were directed specifically at the cult of the perfect body then prominent in Germany. [1] Bellmer was influenced in his choice of art form by reading the published letters of Oskar Kokoschka ( Der Fetisch , 1925).

He visited Paris in 1935 and made contacts there, such as Paul Éluard , but returned to Berlin because his wife Margarete was dying of tuberculosis . [4]

Not all art is stunningly beautiful. Some is a direct reaction to things that are happening to, or around the artist. Some of these can sit very uncomfortably with the audience, yet they can still appreciate the message that the artist is trying to give.

In the case of Bellmer’s ‘The Doll’, the initial reaction can be quite uneasy. The image is a hand painted black and white photograph in soft yellow and green hues. It shows a disfigured and over sexualised form hung from a tree. This speaks all kinds of volumes, why is she disfigured? What happened to the form for it to be hung from a tree? It’s certainly not high up in my beautiful art thoughts, yet I really appreciate it, maybe because I know a bit about the artist and the time he was working.

Bellmer, created this photography in 1935, and had creating dolls as a direct opposition to fascism. He had previously been a draftsman for his own advertising company, but refused to produce material for the Nazi party. The dolls were directed specifically at the perfect body and race cult which had been emerging. Heavily influenced by Jacques Offenbach’s opera Tales of Hoffmann, where a man falls in love with an automaton, Bellmer started to create his dolls which would then penetrate several of his photographic subjects. The dolls incorporate the use of ball joints which he took the idea from a pair of 16th century dolls in the Kaiser Friedrich museum.


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