WEFOUNDUntersuchungen zur Blutgerinnung: Beiträge zur Chemie und Morphologie der Coagulation des Blutes (Classic Reprint) (German Edition)


My chapter presenting an analysis of Guillaume de Machaut’s balade, De petit po  (B18), h as just been published ( partial access via Google Books ).

When I was approached by Michael Tenzer and asked to contribute a chapter to a follow-up volume to his  Analytical Studies in World Music I have to admit to being a little mystified.   Although I was present when Nicholas Cook gave the paper that declared that ‘we are all ethnomusicologists now’, and although I work in the UK where the subdisciplinary divisions between musicology, ethnomusiology, and music theory are rather more fluid at the institutional level, I wasn’t quite prepared for a book with such a title to include a repertoire quite as historically distant as the music as Guillaume de Machaut. Nonetheless, I was happy to oblige.

Unfortunately the publishers, Oxford University Press–an institution that is supposedly a department of my own institution–were categorical in their refusal to allow me to post a copy on my personal website or in my institutional repository ( see here for my early blogpost moaning about this ). I think that’s a huge shame, because the title of the book that it’s in will not make my chapter an obvious find for scholars of Machaut or for students of pre-tonal Western music theory and analysis. Luckily there is partial access to it via Google Books ( click here to link to the chapter on Google Books) .

The Commission launched the sector inquiry into e-commerce on 6 May 2015, as part of the Digital Single Market strategy , on the basis of European Union ("EU") competition rules, pursuant to Article 17 of Regulation 1/2003 . The decision initiating the sector inquiry is available in three languages: en - fr - de .

As part of the sector inquiry, the Commission requested information from a variety of actors in e-commerce markets throughout the EU both in relation to the online sales of consumer goods (such as electronics, clothing, shoes and sports equipment) as well as in relation to the online distribution of digital content. During the inquiry, the Commission has gathered evidence from nearly 1900 companies operating in e-commerce of consumer goods and digital content and has analysed around 8 000 distribution contracts.

In March 2016, the Commission published initial findings on geo-blocking in an issues paper . Geo-blocking refers to business practices, whereby retailers and service providers prevent online shoppers from purchasing consumer goods or accessing digital content services because of the shopper's location or country of residence.

Djet , also known as Wadj , Zet , and Uadji (in Greek possibly the pharaoh known as Uenephes or possibly Atothis ), was the fourth pharaoh of the First Dynasty . Djet's Horus name means "Horus Cobra" [2] or "Serpent of Horus".

Djet's queen was his sister Merneith , who may have ruled as a pharaoh in her own right after his death. There is a possibility that a lady called Ahaneith was also one of his wives. Djet and Merneith's son was Den , and their grandson was Anedjib .

How long Djet ruled is unknown. Only one Sekar festival is attested by ivory labels dating to his reign, whose duration is estimated to be anywhere between six and ten years. According to Wolfgang Helck he reigned 10 years. [3] From a calendar entry, Djer is known to have died on a 7 Peret III while Djet began his reign on 22 Peret IV. The reason for the 45 days of interregnum is unknown.

My chapter presenting an analysis of Guillaume de Machaut’s balade, De petit po  (B18), h as just been published ( partial access via Google Books ).

When I was approached by Michael Tenzer and asked to contribute a chapter to a follow-up volume to his  Analytical Studies in World Music I have to admit to being a little mystified.   Although I was present when Nicholas Cook gave the paper that declared that ‘we are all ethnomusicologists now’, and although I work in the UK where the subdisciplinary divisions between musicology, ethnomusiology, and music theory are rather more fluid at the institutional level, I wasn’t quite prepared for a book with such a title to include a repertoire quite as historically distant as the music as Guillaume de Machaut. Nonetheless, I was happy to oblige.

Unfortunately the publishers, Oxford University Press–an institution that is supposedly a department of my own institution–were categorical in their refusal to allow me to post a copy on my personal website or in my institutional repository ( see here for my early blogpost moaning about this ). I think that’s a huge shame, because the title of the book that it’s in will not make my chapter an obvious find for scholars of Machaut or for students of pre-tonal Western music theory and analysis. Luckily there is partial access to it via Google Books ( click here to link to the chapter on Google Books) .

The Commission launched the sector inquiry into e-commerce on 6 May 2015, as part of the Digital Single Market strategy , on the basis of European Union ("EU") competition rules, pursuant to Article 17 of Regulation 1/2003 . The decision initiating the sector inquiry is available in three languages: en - fr - de .

As part of the sector inquiry, the Commission requested information from a variety of actors in e-commerce markets throughout the EU both in relation to the online sales of consumer goods (such as electronics, clothing, shoes and sports equipment) as well as in relation to the online distribution of digital content. During the inquiry, the Commission has gathered evidence from nearly 1900 companies operating in e-commerce of consumer goods and digital content and has analysed around 8 000 distribution contracts.

In March 2016, the Commission published initial findings on geo-blocking in an issues paper . Geo-blocking refers to business practices, whereby retailers and service providers prevent online shoppers from purchasing consumer goods or accessing digital content services because of the shopper's location or country of residence.

My chapter presenting an analysis of Guillaume de Machaut’s balade, De petit po  (B18), h as just been published ( partial access via Google Books ).

When I was approached by Michael Tenzer and asked to contribute a chapter to a follow-up volume to his  Analytical Studies in World Music I have to admit to being a little mystified.   Although I was present when Nicholas Cook gave the paper that declared that ‘we are all ethnomusicologists now’, and although I work in the UK where the subdisciplinary divisions between musicology, ethnomusiology, and music theory are rather more fluid at the institutional level, I wasn’t quite prepared for a book with such a title to include a repertoire quite as historically distant as the music as Guillaume de Machaut. Nonetheless, I was happy to oblige.

Unfortunately the publishers, Oxford University Press–an institution that is supposedly a department of my own institution–were categorical in their refusal to allow me to post a copy on my personal website or in my institutional repository ( see here for my early blogpost moaning about this ). I think that’s a huge shame, because the title of the book that it’s in will not make my chapter an obvious find for scholars of Machaut or for students of pre-tonal Western music theory and analysis. Luckily there is partial access to it via Google Books ( click here to link to the chapter on Google Books) .


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