WEFOUNDMe Through Poetry: A Collection of Poetry


As when the north winds keenly blow,
And all around fast falls the snow,
...... Read complete »

By the 15th century, the easy-to-write ballad served as a commoners’ alternative to the more formal, courtly sonnet and the more complex rondeau , and ballads were being written in England, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany. French poet Francois Villon’s "Ballad of the Gibbet" shows another direction ballads often took: that of imparting wisdom to readers and listeners. Ballad of the Gibbet
Francois Villon (1431-1489) Brothers and men that shall after us be,

By the time of the Romantic poets, ballad was as familiar to English readers as the novel is to readers today. The Romanticists used that familiarity to their advantage and perfected both the art and storytelling power of the ballad. Out of countless great ballads came the immortal "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) It is an ancient Mariner,

Some Romantic poets experimented with the ballad’s core structure, finding the quatrain too restrictive for their elaborate stories. Byron hit upon the double-quatrain – an eight-line stanza – and wrote a broadside at fellow Romanticists Robert Southey and William Wordsworth that offers insight into the rivalries that existed among the greats of the time: From Don Juan
Southey and Wordsworth
George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824) Bob Southey! You’re a poet–Poet laureate,

For a second you were flying
Like you always wanted to
Now you’ll fly forever
In skies of azure blue
We’ll see your smile in every ray
Of sunshine after rain
And hear the echo of your laughter
Over all the pain
The world’s a little quieter now
The colours have lost their hue
The birds are singing softly
And our hearts are missing you
Each time we see a little cloud
Or a rainbow soaring high
We’ll think of you and gently
Wipe a tear from our eye

A sleep I shall have
A rest I shall have
Yet death will be but a pause
For the peace of my years
In the long green grass
Will be yours and yours and yours.

A limb has fallen from the family tree.
I keep hearing a voice that says, “Grieve not for me”.
Remember the best times, the laughter, the song.
The good life I lived while I was strong.
Continue my heritage, I’m counting on you.
Keep smiling and surely the sun will shine through.
My mind is at ease, my soul is at rest.
Remembering all, how I truly was blessed.
Continue traditions, no matter how small.
Go on with your life, don’t worry about falls
I miss you all dearly, so keep up your chin.
Until the day comes we’re together again.

As when the north winds keenly blow,
And all around fast falls the snow,
...... Read complete »

By the 15th century, the easy-to-write ballad served as a commoners’ alternative to the more formal, courtly sonnet and the more complex rondeau , and ballads were being written in England, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany. French poet Francois Villon’s "Ballad of the Gibbet" shows another direction ballads often took: that of imparting wisdom to readers and listeners. Ballad of the Gibbet
Francois Villon (1431-1489) Brothers and men that shall after us be,

By the time of the Romantic poets, ballad was as familiar to English readers as the novel is to readers today. The Romanticists used that familiarity to their advantage and perfected both the art and storytelling power of the ballad. Out of countless great ballads came the immortal "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) It is an ancient Mariner,

Some Romantic poets experimented with the ballad’s core structure, finding the quatrain too restrictive for their elaborate stories. Byron hit upon the double-quatrain – an eight-line stanza – and wrote a broadside at fellow Romanticists Robert Southey and William Wordsworth that offers insight into the rivalries that existed among the greats of the time: From Don Juan
Southey and Wordsworth
George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824) Bob Southey! You’re a poet–Poet laureate,

As when the north winds keenly blow,
And all around fast falls the snow,
...... Read complete »

As when the north winds keenly blow,
And all around fast falls the snow,
...... Read complete »

By the 15th century, the easy-to-write ballad served as a commoners’ alternative to the more formal, courtly sonnet and the more complex rondeau , and ballads were being written in England, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany. French poet Francois Villon’s "Ballad of the Gibbet" shows another direction ballads often took: that of imparting wisdom to readers and listeners. Ballad of the Gibbet
Francois Villon (1431-1489) Brothers and men that shall after us be,

By the time of the Romantic poets, ballad was as familiar to English readers as the novel is to readers today. The Romanticists used that familiarity to their advantage and perfected both the art and storytelling power of the ballad. Out of countless great ballads came the immortal "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) It is an ancient Mariner,

Some Romantic poets experimented with the ballad’s core structure, finding the quatrain too restrictive for their elaborate stories. Byron hit upon the double-quatrain – an eight-line stanza – and wrote a broadside at fellow Romanticists Robert Southey and William Wordsworth that offers insight into the rivalries that existed among the greats of the time: From Don Juan
Southey and Wordsworth
George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824) Bob Southey! You’re a poet–Poet laureate,

For a second you were flying
Like you always wanted to
Now you’ll fly forever
In skies of azure blue
We’ll see your smile in every ray
Of sunshine after rain
And hear the echo of your laughter
Over all the pain
The world’s a little quieter now
The colours have lost their hue
The birds are singing softly
And our hearts are missing you
Each time we see a little cloud
Or a rainbow soaring high
We’ll think of you and gently
Wipe a tear from our eye

A sleep I shall have
A rest I shall have
Yet death will be but a pause
For the peace of my years
In the long green grass
Will be yours and yours and yours.

A limb has fallen from the family tree.
I keep hearing a voice that says, “Grieve not for me”.
Remember the best times, the laughter, the song.
The good life I lived while I was strong.
Continue my heritage, I’m counting on you.
Keep smiling and surely the sun will shine through.
My mind is at ease, my soul is at rest.
Remembering all, how I truly was blessed.
Continue traditions, no matter how small.
Go on with your life, don’t worry about falls
I miss you all dearly, so keep up your chin.
Until the day comes we’re together again.

In 2001, the grounding of aircraft following the September 11 attacks left a number of performers stranded in cities they had been performing in. [5] After the attacks, a new wave of poetry slam started within New York City with a community focus on poets coming together to speak about the terrorist attacks. [5]

As of 2017 [update] , the National Poetry Slam featured 72 certified teams, culminating in five days of competition. [7]

Poetry Slam Inc. sanctions three major annual poetry competitions (for poets 18+) on a national and international scale: the National Poetry Slam (NPS), the individual World Poetry Slam (iWPS), and the Women of the World Poetry Slam (WoWPS).


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