WEFOUNDThe Flame Imperishable: Tolkien, St. Thomas, and the Metaphysics of Faerie


“McIntosh’s comprehension of Tolkien’s Legendarium  is masterly; his appropriation of Aquinas is superb; his knowledge of the most important works in recent theology is staggering.”

“In a tour de force for religious and non-religious readers alike, McIntosh illuminates Tolkien’s own metaphysical thought and how it pervades the entire fictive world of his legendarium.”

“Breathtakingly original, this book deserves to be a landmark. With a boldness supported closely by a wealth of reasoned argument, McIntosh highlights the singularity and magnitude of Tolkien’s achievement both as an artist and as a speculative thinker.”

At long last, my book  The Flame Imperishable: Tolkien, St. Thomas, and the Metaphysics of Faërie  is now in print, published by the good folks at Angelico Press. Paperback and hardcover versions are available at Amazon here .

Can’t wait to read this! I wrote a paper on Tolkien’s use of the doctrine of analogy last semester, so I am interested to see what additional light can be shed on the research I did.

Behold! Out of the Imperishable Flame
Eru brought forth the Ainur. And they came!
Of Valar – twelve. Of Maia – many more
Were born. So now the Ainur sing before
Illúvatar, performing each alone
For long ages, till the Ainur were shown
The Great Music. Each Ainur of the mind
Of Eru knew a part, yet each did find
That as they listened to each other, grew
In understanding, and the more they knew,
They more completely fathomed and perceived
The plans of Eru which He had conceived.

At last Illúvatar gave them a theme:
The Ainur sang, and melody did stream
And overflow into the Void and fill
The empty space. Their music did instill
A new creation there. Their harmony
Unfolded the Great Music, which as He
Intended, filled the Void.
But thou, Melkor:
What do you seek, what are you looking for
In lonely explorations through the Void?
For what dark ends are your efforts employed?

For Melkor wished that he might next create
Beings who live, whom he could designate
As slaves unto his will. Forced unity
Would subsume and subdue the melody
Of Eru, so that Melkor might rule all!

“McIntosh’s comprehension of Tolkien’s Legendarium  is masterly; his appropriation of Aquinas is superb; his knowledge of the most important works in recent theology is staggering.”

“In a tour de force for religious and non-religious readers alike, McIntosh illuminates Tolkien’s own metaphysical thought and how it pervades the entire fictive world of his legendarium.”

“Breathtakingly original, this book deserves to be a landmark. With a boldness supported closely by a wealth of reasoned argument, McIntosh highlights the singularity and magnitude of Tolkien’s achievement both as an artist and as a speculative thinker.”

At long last, my book  The Flame Imperishable: Tolkien, St. Thomas, and the Metaphysics of Faërie  is now in print, published by the good folks at Angelico Press. Paperback and hardcover versions are available at Amazon here .

Can’t wait to read this! I wrote a paper on Tolkien’s use of the doctrine of analogy last semester, so I am interested to see what additional light can be shed on the research I did.

“McIntosh’s comprehension of Tolkien’s Legendarium  is masterly; his appropriation of Aquinas is superb; his knowledge of the most important works in recent theology is staggering.”

“In a tour de force for religious and non-religious readers alike, McIntosh illuminates Tolkien’s own metaphysical thought and how it pervades the entire fictive world of his legendarium.”

“Breathtakingly original, this book deserves to be a landmark. With a boldness supported closely by a wealth of reasoned argument, McIntosh highlights the singularity and magnitude of Tolkien’s achievement both as an artist and as a speculative thinker.”


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