WEFOUNDNosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (BFI Modern Classics)


Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht is not a horror film by most people's definition. It moves slowly. The dialogue is even delivered very softly and deliberately with a sense of pain, emptiness, and loss in the voices. In addition, Nosferatu never really has any action, violence, or gore. The film is rarely boring though because there's a certain hypnotic quality to the exceptional artistry it offers. It's a successful horror because of its foreboding atmosphere. The visuals, performances, settings, mood, and score all add up to a splendorous haunting film.

Dracula wants one of two things; give him humanity or give him death. He longs for the things the humans he prays on take for granted, things he cannot have like companionship and love. He'd even like to grow old! His immortality only brings him sadness because he's forever doomed to deprivation. He is an enigmatic character, torn between his lust for humanity and the plight of his existence. This and the overall complexity of his "life" give him a level of intensity that exceeds his bloodsucking peers. In addition, this is the Dracula where you truly feel as sorry, perhaps sorrier, for the vampire than for his victims.

Dracula's visitor is Jonathan Harker (Bruno Ganz). He is incredibly oblivious and naïve. He ignores every sign and warning that he shouldn't make this trip and recruit the count to be his new neighbor. His intentions are good. He wants to use the money he'll make on the sale to provide a better life for his incredibly beautiful wife Lucy Harker (Isabelle Adjani). Of course, Jonathan doesn't realize that his wife could care less about material goods and only wants to be with him, which his long trip will prevent in more ways than one.

Herzog's production of Nosferatu was very well received by critics and enjoyed a comfortable degree of commercial success. [2] The film also marks the second of five collaborations between director Herzog and actor Kinski, [3] immediately followed by 1979's Woyzeck . The film had 1,000,000 admissions in West Germany and grossed ITL 53,870,000 in Italy. [4] The film was also a modest success in Adjani's home country, taking in 933,533 admissions in France. [5]

Lucy's beauty and purity distract Dracula from the call of the rooster, and at the first light of day, he collapses to the floor, dead. Van Helsing arrives to discover Lucy, dead but victorious. He then drives a stake through the heart of the Count to make sure Lucy's sacrifice was not in vain. In a final twist, Jonathan Harker awakens from his sickness, now a vampire, and arranges for Van Helsing's arrest for the murder of Count Dracula. He is last seen traveling away on horseback, garbed in the same fluttering black as Dracula, stating enigmatically that he has much to do.

Herzog considered Murnau's Nosferatu to be the greatest film ever to come out of Germany, [7] and was eager to make his own version of the film, with Klaus Kinski in the leading role. In 1979, by which time the copyright for Dracula had entered the public domain , Herzog proceeded with his updated version of the classic German film, which could now include the original character names.

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht is not a horror film by most people's definition. It moves slowly. The dialogue is even delivered very softly and deliberately with a sense of pain, emptiness, and loss in the voices. In addition, Nosferatu never really has any action, violence, or gore. The film is rarely boring though because there's a certain hypnotic quality to the exceptional artistry it offers. It's a successful horror because of its foreboding atmosphere. The visuals, performances, settings, mood, and score all add up to a splendorous haunting film.

Dracula wants one of two things; give him humanity or give him death. He longs for the things the humans he prays on take for granted, things he cannot have like companionship and love. He'd even like to grow old! His immortality only brings him sadness because he's forever doomed to deprivation. He is an enigmatic character, torn between his lust for humanity and the plight of his existence. This and the overall complexity of his "life" give him a level of intensity that exceeds his bloodsucking peers. In addition, this is the Dracula where you truly feel as sorry, perhaps sorrier, for the vampire than for his victims.

Dracula's visitor is Jonathan Harker (Bruno Ganz). He is incredibly oblivious and naïve. He ignores every sign and warning that he shouldn't make this trip and recruit the count to be his new neighbor. His intentions are good. He wants to use the money he'll make on the sale to provide a better life for his incredibly beautiful wife Lucy Harker (Isabelle Adjani). Of course, Jonathan doesn't realize that his wife could care less about material goods and only wants to be with him, which his long trip will prevent in more ways than one.

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht is not a horror film by most people's definition. It moves slowly. The dialogue is even delivered very softly and deliberately with a sense of pain, emptiness, and loss in the voices. In addition, Nosferatu never really has any action, violence, or gore. The film is rarely boring though because there's a certain hypnotic quality to the exceptional artistry it offers. It's a successful horror because of its foreboding atmosphere. The visuals, performances, settings, mood, and score all add up to a splendorous haunting film.

Dracula wants one of two things; give him humanity or give him death. He longs for the things the humans he prays on take for granted, things he cannot have like companionship and love. He'd even like to grow old! His immortality only brings him sadness because he's forever doomed to deprivation. He is an enigmatic character, torn between his lust for humanity and the plight of his existence. This and the overall complexity of his "life" give him a level of intensity that exceeds his bloodsucking peers. In addition, this is the Dracula where you truly feel as sorry, perhaps sorrier, for the vampire than for his victims.

Dracula's visitor is Jonathan Harker (Bruno Ganz). He is incredibly oblivious and naïve. He ignores every sign and warning that he shouldn't make this trip and recruit the count to be his new neighbor. His intentions are good. He wants to use the money he'll make on the sale to provide a better life for his incredibly beautiful wife Lucy Harker (Isabelle Adjani). Of course, Jonathan doesn't realize that his wife could care less about material goods and only wants to be with him, which his long trip will prevent in more ways than one.

Herzog's production of Nosferatu was very well received by critics and enjoyed a comfortable degree of commercial success. [2] The film also marks the second of five collaborations between director Herzog and actor Kinski, [3] immediately followed by 1979's Woyzeck . The film had 1,000,000 admissions in West Germany and grossed ITL 53,870,000 in Italy. [4] The film was also a modest success in Adjani's home country, taking in 933,533 admissions in France. [5]

Lucy's beauty and purity distract Dracula from the call of the rooster, and at the first light of day, he collapses to the floor, dead. Van Helsing arrives to discover Lucy, dead but victorious. He then drives a stake through the heart of the Count to make sure Lucy's sacrifice was not in vain. In a final twist, Jonathan Harker awakens from his sickness, now a vampire, and arranges for Van Helsing's arrest for the murder of Count Dracula. He is last seen traveling away on horseback, garbed in the same fluttering black as Dracula, stating enigmatically that he has much to do.

Herzog considered Murnau's Nosferatu to be the greatest film ever to come out of Germany, [7] and was eager to make his own version of the film, with Klaus Kinski in the leading role. In 1979, by which time the copyright for Dracula had entered the public domain , Herzog proceeded with his updated version of the classic German film, which could now include the original character names.

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