WEFOUNDWorld War I and the Weimar Artists Dix, Grosz, Beckmann, Schlemmer by Marianne. Eberle 1985-07-01


World Cup winner Lewis Moody produced and presents the film, on a subject he describes as a passion of his, and whose grandfather was one of the fortunate ones to return from war.

The film takes us to cemeteries of northern Europe and tells the stories of ordinary rugby men from up and down England who signed up to serve in the Great War.

Moody interviews his former team-mates Martin Johnson and Neil Back as well former England international Rory Underwood who served with the RAF while flying down the Twickenham wing as an amateur.

World War I and American Art
Through April 9 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 215-972-7600, pafa.org. It travels to the New-York Historical Society, May 26-Sept. 3.

World Cup winner Lewis Moody produced and presents the film, on a subject he describes as a passion of his, and whose grandfather was one of the fortunate ones to return from war.

The film takes us to cemeteries of northern Europe and tells the stories of ordinary rugby men from up and down England who signed up to serve in the Great War.

Moody interviews his former team-mates Martin Johnson and Neil Back as well former England international Rory Underwood who served with the RAF while flying down the Twickenham wing as an amateur.

World War I and American Art
Through April 9 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 215-972-7600, pafa.org. It travels to the New-York Historical Society, May 26-Sept. 3.

We invite you to read "Views From the Embassy: The Role of the U.S. Diplomatic Community in France, 1914" (PDF, 818 KB), which complements U.S. Embassy France’s WWI Centennial page . Readers may view full copies of several documents referenced in “Views From the Embassy” through links on the Embassy’s WWI Interactive Timeline .

April 2017 marked the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I. To commemorate the centennial, the USCIS History Office and Library is highlighting the history of immigration and naturalization during the war. Be sure to check back for updates throughout the centennial.

As the American military mobilized to enter World War I in 1917, its ranks filled with a diverse cross-section of American society, including immigrants from around the world. 

Women have long been involved in the military during times of war, though not always in a capacity that we might recognize as “traditionally” military.  For centuries women have followed armies, many of them soldiers’ wives, providing indispensable services such as cooking, nursing, and laundry—in fact, “armies could not have functioned as well, perhaps could not have functioned at all, without the service of women.”  1

Another significant change to women’s service during the Great War is that American civilian women donned uniforms. The uniforms allowed women to look the part and claim credibility for their services, as well as to be taken seriously by others; many women saw their wartime service as a way to claim full citizenship, and the uniforms symbolized “their credentials as citizens engaged in wartime service.”  2

Other women donned uniforms because of their association with the military—World War I was the first time in American history in which women were officially attached to arms of the American military and government agencies.  Yeomen (F) served with the Navy and the Marine Corps, while the Army Nurse Corps was attached to the Army.  In France, 223 American women popularly known as “Hello Girls” served as long-distance switchboard operators for the U.S. Army Signal Corps.

Historian Hunt Tooley will be teaching World War One: A Revisionist Perspective , a Mises Academy online course, starting October 29.

The changes wrought in America during the First World War were so profound that one scholar has referred to "the Wilsonian Revolution in government." 1 Like other revolutions, it was preceded by an intellectual transformation, as the philosophy of progressivism came to dominate political discourse. 2 Progressive notions — of the obsolescence of laissez-faire and of constitutionally limited government, the urgent need to "organize" society "scientifically," and the superiority of the collective over the individual — were propagated by the most influential sector of the intelligentsia and began to make inroads in the nation's political life.

Woodrow Wilson's readiness to cast off traditional restraints on government power greatly facilitated the "foisting" of such "innovations." The result was a shrinking of American freedoms unrivaled since at least the War Between the States.

World Cup winner Lewis Moody produced and presents the film, on a subject he describes as a passion of his, and whose grandfather was one of the fortunate ones to return from war.

The film takes us to cemeteries of northern Europe and tells the stories of ordinary rugby men from up and down England who signed up to serve in the Great War.

Moody interviews his former team-mates Martin Johnson and Neil Back as well former England international Rory Underwood who served with the RAF while flying down the Twickenham wing as an amateur.

World War I and American Art
Through April 9 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 215-972-7600, pafa.org. It travels to the New-York Historical Society, May 26-Sept. 3.

We invite you to read "Views From the Embassy: The Role of the U.S. Diplomatic Community in France, 1914" (PDF, 818 KB), which complements U.S. Embassy France’s WWI Centennial page . Readers may view full copies of several documents referenced in “Views From the Embassy” through links on the Embassy’s WWI Interactive Timeline .

April 2017 marked the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I. To commemorate the centennial, the USCIS History Office and Library is highlighting the history of immigration and naturalization during the war. Be sure to check back for updates throughout the centennial.

As the American military mobilized to enter World War I in 1917, its ranks filled with a diverse cross-section of American society, including immigrants from around the world. 

Women have long been involved in the military during times of war, though not always in a capacity that we might recognize as “traditionally” military.  For centuries women have followed armies, many of them soldiers’ wives, providing indispensable services such as cooking, nursing, and laundry—in fact, “armies could not have functioned as well, perhaps could not have functioned at all, without the service of women.”  1

Another significant change to women’s service during the Great War is that American civilian women donned uniforms. The uniforms allowed women to look the part and claim credibility for their services, as well as to be taken seriously by others; many women saw their wartime service as a way to claim full citizenship, and the uniforms symbolized “their credentials as citizens engaged in wartime service.”  2

Other women donned uniforms because of their association with the military—World War I was the first time in American history in which women were officially attached to arms of the American military and government agencies.  Yeomen (F) served with the Navy and the Marine Corps, while the Army Nurse Corps was attached to the Army.  In France, 223 American women popularly known as “Hello Girls” served as long-distance switchboard operators for the U.S. Army Signal Corps.

World Cup winner Lewis Moody produced and presents the film, on a subject he describes as a passion of his, and whose grandfather was one of the fortunate ones to return from war.

The film takes us to cemeteries of northern Europe and tells the stories of ordinary rugby men from up and down England who signed up to serve in the Great War.

Moody interviews his former team-mates Martin Johnson and Neil Back as well former England international Rory Underwood who served with the RAF while flying down the Twickenham wing as an amateur.

World War I and American Art
Through April 9 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 215-972-7600, pafa.org. It travels to the New-York Historical Society, May 26-Sept. 3.

We invite you to read "Views From the Embassy: The Role of the U.S. Diplomatic Community in France, 1914" (PDF, 818 KB), which complements U.S. Embassy France’s WWI Centennial page . Readers may view full copies of several documents referenced in “Views From the Embassy” through links on the Embassy’s WWI Interactive Timeline .

World Cup winner Lewis Moody produced and presents the film, on a subject he describes as a passion of his, and whose grandfather was one of the fortunate ones to return from war.

The film takes us to cemeteries of northern Europe and tells the stories of ordinary rugby men from up and down England who signed up to serve in the Great War.

Moody interviews his former team-mates Martin Johnson and Neil Back as well former England international Rory Underwood who served with the RAF while flying down the Twickenham wing as an amateur.

World War I and American Art
Through April 9 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 215-972-7600, pafa.org. It travels to the New-York Historical Society, May 26-Sept. 3.

We invite you to read "Views From the Embassy: The Role of the U.S. Diplomatic Community in France, 1914" (PDF, 818 KB), which complements U.S. Embassy France’s WWI Centennial page . Readers may view full copies of several documents referenced in “Views From the Embassy” through links on the Embassy’s WWI Interactive Timeline .

April 2017 marked the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I. To commemorate the centennial, the USCIS History Office and Library is highlighting the history of immigration and naturalization during the war. Be sure to check back for updates throughout the centennial.

As the American military mobilized to enter World War I in 1917, its ranks filled with a diverse cross-section of American society, including immigrants from around the world. 

World Cup winner Lewis Moody produced and presents the film, on a subject he describes as a passion of his, and whose grandfather was one of the fortunate ones to return from war.

The film takes us to cemeteries of northern Europe and tells the stories of ordinary rugby men from up and down England who signed up to serve in the Great War.

Moody interviews his former team-mates Martin Johnson and Neil Back as well former England international Rory Underwood who served with the RAF while flying down the Twickenham wing as an amateur.


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