WEFOUNDMother Goose in Prose


Sing a song o' sixpence, a handful of rye, Four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie; When the pie was opened the birds began to sing, Was not that a dainty dish to set before the King?

"If you have never heard the legend of Gilligren and the king's pie, you will scarcely understand the above verse; so I will tell you the whole story…." Thus The Wonderful Wizard of Oz creator, L. Frank Baum, delights readers and listeners of all ages with his imaginative tales of the “real” stories behind the beloved nursery rhymes. Written in 1897, Mother Goose in Prose was the book that launched Baum’s career as a writer.

Sing a song o' sixpence, a handful of rye, Four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie; When the pie was opened the birds began to sing, Was not that a dainty dish to set before the King?

"If you have never heard the legend of Gilligren and the king's pie, you will scarcely understand the above verse; so I will tell you the whole story…." Thus The Wonderful Wizard of Oz creator, L. Frank Baum, delights readers and listeners of all ages with his imaginative tales of the “real” stories behind the beloved nursery rhymes. Written in 1897, Mother Goose in Prose was the book that launched Baum’s career as a writer.

Mother Goose in Prose is a collection of twenty-two children's stories based on Mother Goose nursery rhymes . It was the first children's book written by L. Frank Baum , and the first book illustrated by Maxfield Parrish . It was originally published in 1897 by Way and Williams of Chicago, and re-released by the George M. Hill Company in 1901. [1]

The book opens with an introduction by Baum that traces the history of Mother Goose. It is followed by the original text of a nursery rhyme with a broader story to establish its literary context.

The book's last selection features a girl named Dorothy who can talk to animals — an anticipation of the Oz books . When Baum later included this story in his Juvenile Speaker (1910) and The Snuggle Tales (1916–17), he changed the girl's name to Doris, to avoid confusing her with Dorothy Gale . [2]


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