WEFOUNDA Catholic Funeral


A Catholic funeral is carried out in accordance with the prescribed rites of the Catholic Church . Such funerals are referred to in Catholic canon law as "ecclesiastical funerals" and are dealt with in canons 1176–1185 of the Code of Canon Law and canons 874–879 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches . In Catholic funerals, the Church seeks firstly to offer the Mass for the benefit of the soul of the deceased so that the temporal effects of sin in Purgatory may be extinguished, and secondly to provide condolence and comfort for the deceased's family and exhort the latter to pray , along with the Church, for the soul of the departed.

In general, Catholics are to be given a Catholic funeral upon their death. [1] Catechumens are to be considered as Catholics with regard to funeral matters, [2] [3] and the local ordinary may permit unbaptized children whose parents intended to have them baptized to be given a Catholic funeral. [4] [5] The local ordinary may also permit baptized persons who were not Catholic to be given a Catholic funeral, provided their own minister is not available, unless they were clearly opposed to it. [6] [7]

However, Catholic burial rites are to be refused even to baptized Catholics who fall within any of the following classifications, unless they gave some sign of repentance before death:

A Catholic funeral is carried out in accordance with the prescribed rites of the Catholic Church. Such funerals are referred to in Catholic canon law as ...

17.01.2018  · Catholics commonly believe that death is the passing from the physical world to the afterlife, where the deceased’s soul will live in Heaven, Hell, or ...

"At the death of a Christian, whose life of faith was begun in the waters of Baptism and strengthened at the Eucharistic table, the Church intercedes on behalf of the ...

Just what constitutes a Catholic funeral can be a confusing thing, even for many Catholics. Non-Catholics may have only the faintest idea of Catholic funeral rites and what they entail, or what to expect if they attend a Catholic service. The death of a loved one can prompt one or all of several different ways the church celebrates that life, from the vigil to a Mass of intention to the actual Funeral Mass.

The vigil for the deceased is often confused with a wake, but they are not the same thing. A vigil is the first of three official rites of the church and is always performed. It is usually held on the day or evening before the Funeral Mass, in the funeral home, the home of the deceased or in the church. It can be conducted by a priest, deacon or layperson, and will consist of readings from Scripture, song, Psalms and prayers of intercession for the dead. A wake is held by friends or family, and is a time of sharing stories and remembrances of the deceased. Praying the Rosary is often part of a wake or visitation, but is not a part of the vigil.

A non-Catholic may be invited to attend a Mass that is offered in memory of the deceased, for the benefit of the soul of the deceased. This is a normal Mass with no body present, and it may be offered at any time. It is not a public celebration of the life of the deceased, but the repose of the soul is prayed for. Since this Mass is given for a private intention, prayers for a non-Catholic could be offered, but this is in no way a funeral. A Mass offered for the soul of loved one may be conducted more than once, while the funeral Mass occurs as a singular event in the public life of the church.

A Catholic funeral is carried out in accordance with the prescribed rites of the Catholic Church . Such funerals are referred to in Catholic canon law as "ecclesiastical funerals" and are dealt with in canons 1176–1185 of the Code of Canon Law and canons 874–879 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches . In Catholic funerals, the Church seeks firstly to offer the Mass for the benefit of the soul of the deceased so that the temporal effects of sin in Purgatory may be extinguished, and secondly to provide condolence and comfort for the deceased's family and exhort the latter to pray , along with the Church, for the soul of the departed.

In general, Catholics are to be given a Catholic funeral upon their death. [1] Catechumens are to be considered as Catholics with regard to funeral matters, [2] [3] and the local ordinary may permit unbaptized children whose parents intended to have them baptized to be given a Catholic funeral. [4] [5] The local ordinary may also permit baptized persons who were not Catholic to be given a Catholic funeral, provided their own minister is not available, unless they were clearly opposed to it. [6] [7]

However, Catholic burial rites are to be refused even to baptized Catholics who fall within any of the following classifications, unless they gave some sign of repentance before death:

A Catholic funeral is carried out in accordance with the prescribed rites of the Catholic Church. Such funerals are referred to in Catholic canon law as ...

17.01.2018  · Catholics commonly believe that death is the passing from the physical world to the afterlife, where the deceased’s soul will live in Heaven, Hell, or ...

"At the death of a Christian, whose life of faith was begun in the waters of Baptism and strengthened at the Eucharistic table, the Church intercedes on behalf of the ...

A Catholic funeral is carried out in accordance with the prescribed rites of the Catholic Church . Such funerals are referred to in Catholic canon law as "ecclesiastical funerals" and are dealt with in canons 1176–1185 of the Code of Canon Law and canons 874–879 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches . In Catholic funerals, the Church seeks firstly to offer the Mass for the benefit of the soul of the deceased so that the temporal effects of sin in Purgatory may be extinguished, and secondly to provide condolence and comfort for the deceased's family and exhort the latter to pray , along with the Church, for the soul of the departed.

In general, Catholics are to be given a Catholic funeral upon their death. [1] Catechumens are to be considered as Catholics with regard to funeral matters, [2] [3] and the local ordinary may permit unbaptized children whose parents intended to have them baptized to be given a Catholic funeral. [4] [5] The local ordinary may also permit baptized persons who were not Catholic to be given a Catholic funeral, provided their own minister is not available, unless they were clearly opposed to it. [6] [7]

However, Catholic burial rites are to be refused even to baptized Catholics who fall within any of the following classifications, unless they gave some sign of repentance before death:

A Catholic funeral is carried out in accordance with the prescribed rites of the Catholic Church . Such funerals are referred to in Catholic canon law as "ecclesiastical funerals" and are dealt with in canons 1176–1185 of the Code of Canon Law and canons 874–879 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches . In Catholic funerals, the Church seeks firstly to offer the Mass for the benefit of the soul of the deceased so that the temporal effects of sin in Purgatory may be extinguished, and secondly to provide condolence and comfort for the deceased's family and exhort the latter to pray , along with the Church, for the soul of the departed.

In general, Catholics are to be given a Catholic funeral upon their death. [1] Catechumens are to be considered as Catholics with regard to funeral matters, [2] [3] and the local ordinary may permit unbaptized children whose parents intended to have them baptized to be given a Catholic funeral. [4] [5] The local ordinary may also permit baptized persons who were not Catholic to be given a Catholic funeral, provided their own minister is not available, unless they were clearly opposed to it. [6] [7]

However, Catholic burial rites are to be refused even to baptized Catholics who fall within any of the following classifications, unless they gave some sign of repentance before death:

A Catholic funeral is carried out in accordance with the prescribed rites of the Catholic Church. Such funerals are referred to in Catholic canon law as ...

17.01.2018  · Catholics commonly believe that death is the passing from the physical world to the afterlife, where the deceased’s soul will live in Heaven, Hell, or ...

"At the death of a Christian, whose life of faith was begun in the waters of Baptism and strengthened at the Eucharistic table, the Church intercedes on behalf of the ...

Just what constitutes a Catholic funeral can be a confusing thing, even for many Catholics. Non-Catholics may have only the faintest idea of Catholic funeral rites and what they entail, or what to expect if they attend a Catholic service. The death of a loved one can prompt one or all of several different ways the church celebrates that life, from the vigil to a Mass of intention to the actual Funeral Mass.

The vigil for the deceased is often confused with a wake, but they are not the same thing. A vigil is the first of three official rites of the church and is always performed. It is usually held on the day or evening before the Funeral Mass, in the funeral home, the home of the deceased or in the church. It can be conducted by a priest, deacon or layperson, and will consist of readings from Scripture, song, Psalms and prayers of intercession for the dead. A wake is held by friends or family, and is a time of sharing stories and remembrances of the deceased. Praying the Rosary is often part of a wake or visitation, but is not a part of the vigil.

A non-Catholic may be invited to attend a Mass that is offered in memory of the deceased, for the benefit of the soul of the deceased. This is a normal Mass with no body present, and it may be offered at any time. It is not a public celebration of the life of the deceased, but the repose of the soul is prayed for. Since this Mass is given for a private intention, prayers for a non-Catholic could be offered, but this is in no way a funeral. A Mass offered for the soul of loved one may be conducted more than once, while the funeral Mass occurs as a singular event in the public life of the church.

The following are some very broad guidelines for family members of a Catholic person who is dying or who has died. It has been prepared by the Catholic Health Association of BC. This information is intended to assist family members and loved ones who may not be familiar with the requirements for a Catholic funeral and burial in knowing what needs to be done.

“He will wipe away all tears from their eyes; there will be no more death and no more mourning or sadness or pain.” Rev. 21:4

It is important to notify caregivers, hospital staff and pastoral care visitors that the dying/deceased person is Catholic.
Oftentimes, these individuals will know what procedures are to be followed and may be of assistance at this difficult time.


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